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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:安德烈·费德拉 大小:aNB349K280797KB 下载:OAuobNlQ98120次
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日期:2020-08-09 13:46:57
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古正举

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "The thing shall be done," exclaimed Alcinous, "as surely as I stilllive and reign over the Phaeacians. Our guest is indeed very anxiousto get home, still we must persuade him to remain with us untilto-morrow, by which time I shall be able to get together the whole sumthat I mean to give him. As regards- his escort it will be a matterfor you all, and mine above all others as the chief person among you."
2.  Therewith she went down into the cave to look for the safesthiding places, while Ulysses brought up all the treasure of gold,bronze, and good clothing which the Phaecians had given him. Theystowed everything carefully away, and Minerva set a stone againstthe door of the cave. Then the two sat down by the root of the greatolive, and consulted how to compass the destruction of the wickedsuitors.
3.  On this the gods gathered to the house of Vulcan. Earth-encirclingNeptune came, and Mercury the bringer of luck, and King Apollo, butthe goddesses stayed at home all of them for shame. Then the givers ofall good things stood in the doorway, and the blessed gods roared withinextinguishable laughter, as they saw how cunning Vulcan had been,whereon one would turn towards his neighbour saying:
4.  Then Antinous said, "Queen Penelope, daughter of Icarius, take asmany presents as you please from any one who will give them to you; itis not well to refuse a present; but we will not go about our businessnor stir from where we are, till you have married the best man amongus whoever he may be."
5.  On this the old woman went out of the room to bid the maids go totheir mistress. In the meantime Minerva bethought her of anothermatter, and sent Penelope off into a sweet slumber; so she lay down onher couch and her limbs became heavy with sleep. Then the goddess shedgrace and beauty over her that all the Achaeans might admire her.She washed her face with the ambrosial loveliness that Venus wearswhen she goes dancing with the Graces; she made her taller and of amore commanding figure, while as for her complexion it was whiter thansawn ivory. When Minerva had done all this she went away, whereonthe maids came in from the women's room and woke Penelope with thesound of their talking.
6.  "And I saw Leda the wife of Tyndarus, who bore him two famoussons, Castor breaker of horses, and Pollux the mighty boxer. Boththese heroes are lying under the earth, though they are still alive,for by a special dispensation of Jove, they die and come to lifeagain, each one of them every other day throughout all time, andthey have the rank of gods.

计划指导

1.  To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "Old man, you willneither get paid for bringing good news, nor will Ulysses ever comehome; drink you wine in peace, and let us talk about something else.Do not keep on reminding me of all this; it always pains me when anyone speaks about my honoured master. As for your oath we will let italone, but I only wish he may come, as do Penelope, his old fatherLaertes, and his son Telemachus. I am terribly unhappy too aboutthis same boy of his; he was running up fast into manhood, and badefare to be no worse man, face and figure, than his father, but someone, either god or man, has been unsettling his mind, so he has goneoff to Pylos to try and get news of his father, and the suitors arelying in wait for him as he is coming home, in the hope of leaving thehouse of Arceisius without a name in Ithaca. But let us say no moreabout him, and leave him to be taken, or else to escape if the sonof Saturn holds his hand over him to protect him. And now, old man,tell me your own story; tell me also, for I want to know, who youare and where you come from. Tell me of your town and parents, whatmanner of ship you came in, how crew brought you to Ithaca, and fromwhat country they professed to come- for you cannot have come byland."
2.  "Call him here, then," said Penelope, "that I too may hear hisstory. As for the suitors, let them take their pleasure indoors or outas they will, for they have nothing to fret about. Their corn and wineremain unwasted in their houses with none but servants to consumethem, while they keep hanging about our house day after daysacrificing our oxen, sheep, and fat goats for their banquets, andnever giving so much as a thought to the quantity of wine theydrink. No estate can stand such recklessness, for we have now noUlysses to protect us. If he were to come again, he and his sonwould soon have their revenge."
3.  "Poor wretch," said she, "are you gone clean out of your mind? Goand sleep in some smithy, or place of public gossips, instead ofchattering here. Are you not ashamed of opening your mouth before yourbetters- so many of them too? Has the wine been getting into yourhead, or do you always babble in this way? You seem to have lostyour wits because you beat the tramp Irus; take care that a better manthan he does not come and cudgel you about the head till he pack youbleeding out of the house."
4.  They swore as he told them, and when they had completed their oathTelemachus put in a word and said, "Stranger, if you have a mind tosettle with this fellow, you need not be afraid of any one here.Whoever strikes you will have to fight more than one. I am host, andthe other chiefs, Antinous and Eurymachus, both of them men ofunderstanding, are of the same mind as I am."
5.  "Do not scold me, mother,' answered Telemachus, "nor vex me,seeing what a narrow escape I have had, but wash your face, changeyour dress, go upstairs with your maids, and promise full andsufficient hecatombs to all the gods if Jove will only grant us ourrevenge upon the suitors. I must now go to the place of assembly toinvite a stranger who has come back with me from Pylos. I sent himon with my crew, and told Piraeus to take him home and look afterhim till I could come for him myself."
6.  Telemachus went and knocked at the door of the women's room. "Makehaste," said he, "you old woman who have been set over all the otherwomen in the house. Come outside; my father wishes to speak to you."

推荐功能

1.  On this Telemachus went by torch-light to the other side of theinner court, to the room in which he always slept. There he lay in hisbed till morning, while Ulysses was left in the cloister ponderingon the means whereby with Minerva's help he might be able to killthe suitors.
2.  "When we had passed the [Wandering] rocks, with Scylla andterrible Charybdis, we reached the noble island of the sun-god,where were the goodly cattle and sheep belonging to the sunHyperion. While still at sea in my ship I could bear the cattle lowingas they came home to the yards, and the sheep bleating. Then Iremembered what the blind Theban prophet Teiresias had told me, andhow carefully Aeaean Circe had warned me to shun the island of theblessed sun-god. So being much troubled I said to the men, 'My men,I know you are hard pressed, but listen while I tell you theprophecy that Teiresias made me, and how carefully Aeaean Circe warnedme to shun the island of the blessed sun-god, for it was here, shesaid, that our worst danger would lie. Head the ship, therefore,away from the island.'
3.  Then turning to Ulysses he said, "Stranger, will you work as aservant, if I send you to the wolds and see that you are well paid?Can you build a stone fence, or plant trees? I will have you fed allthe year round, and will find you in shoes and clothing. Will yougo, then? Not you; for you have got into bad ways, and do not wantto work; you had rather fill your belly by going round the countrybegging."
4.  "'What ails you, Polyphemus,' said they, 'that you make such anoise, breaking the stillness of the night, and preventing us frombeing able to sleep? Surely no man is carrying off your sheep?Surely no man is trying to kill you either by fraud or by force?
5.   "With this I left the ship and went up inland. When I got throughthe charmed grove, and was near the great house of the enchantressCirce, I met Mercury with his golden wand, disguised as a young man inthe hey-day of his youth and beauty with the down just coming upon hisface. He came up to me and took my hand within his own, saying, 'Mypoor unhappy man, whither are you going over this mountain top,alone and without knowing the way? Your men are shut up in Circe'spigsties, like so many wild boars in their lairs. You surely do notfancy that you can set them free? I can tell you that you will neverget back and will have to stay there with the rest of them. Butnever mind, I will protect you and get you out of your difficulty.Take this herb, which is one of great virtue, and keep it about youwhen you go to Circe's house, it will be a talisman to you againstevery kind of mischief.
6.  "Here she ended, and dawn enthroned in gold began to show in heaven,whereon she returned inland. I then went on board and told my men toloose the ship from her moorings; so they at once got into her, tooktheir places, and began to smite the grey sea with their oars.Presently the great and cunning goddess Circe befriended us with afair wind that blew dead aft, and stayed steadily with us, keeping oursails well filled, so we did whatever wanted doing to the ship's gear,and let her go as wind and helmsman headed her.

应用

1.  "My friend," replied Ulysses, "you are very positive, and veryhard of belief about your master's coming home again, nevertheless Iwill not merely say, but will swear, that he is coming. Do not give meanything for my news till he has actually come, you may then give me ashirt and cloak of good wear if you will. I am in great want, but Iwill not take anything at all till then, for I hate a man, even as Ihate hell fire, who lets his poverty tempt him into lying. I swearby king Jove, by the rites of hospitality, and by that hearth ofUlysses to which I have now come, that all will surely happen as Ihave said it will. Ulysses will return in this self same year; withthe end of this moon and the beginning of the next he will be hereto do vengeance on all those who are ill treating his wife and son."
2.  "Then send him away," said Mercury, "or Jove will be angry withyou and punish you"'
3.  While he was thus in two minds, Neptune sent a terrible great wavethat seemed to rear itself above his head till it broke right over theraft, which then went to pieces as though it were a heap of drychaff tossed about by a whirlwind. Ulysses got astride of one plankand rode upon it as if he were on horseback; he then took off theclothes Calypso had given him, bound Ino's veil under his arms, andplunged into the sea- meaning to swim on shore. King Neptune watchedhim as he did so, and wagged his head, muttering to himself andsaying, "'There now, swim up and down as you best can till you fall inwith well-to-do people. I do not think you will be able to say thatI have let you off too lightly." On this he lashed his horses anddrove to Aegae where his palace is.
4、  Penelope, who was sleeping sweetly at the gates of dreamland,answered, "Sister, why have you come here? You do not come very often,but I suppose that is because you live such a long way off. Am I,then, to leave off crying and refrain from all the sad thoughts thattorture me? I, who have lost my brave and lion-hearted husband, whohad every good quality under heaven, and whose name was great over allHellas and middle Argos; and now my darling son has gone off onboard of a ship- a foolish fellow who has never been used toroughing it, nor to going about among gatherings of men. I am evenmore anxious about him than about my husband; I am all in a tremblewhen I think of him, lest something should happen to him, eitherfrom the people among whom he has gone, or by sea, for he has manyenemies who are plotting against him, and are bent on killing himbefore he can return home."
5、  Such was his story, but Minerva smiled and caressed him with herhand. Then she took the form of a woman, fair, stately, and wise,"He must be indeed a shifty lying fellow," said she, "who couldsurpass you in all manner of craft even though you had a god foryour antagonist. Dare-devil that you are, full of guile, unwearying indeceit, can you not drop your tricks and your instinctive falsehood,even now that you are in your own country again? We will say nomore, however, about this, for we can both of us deceive uponoccasion- you are the most accomplished counsellor and orator amongall mankind, while I for diplomacy and subtlety have no equal amongthe gods. Did you not know Jove's daughter Minerva- me, who havebeen ever with you, who kept watch over you in all your troubles,and who made the Phaeacians take so great a liking to you? And now,again, I am come here to talk things over with you, and help you tohide the treasure I made the Phaeacians give you; I want to tell youabout the troubles that await you in your own house; you have got toface them, but tell no one, neither man nor woman, that you havecome home again. Bear everything, and put up with every man'sinsolence, without a word."

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  • 顾长卫 08-08

      Thus spoke Menelaus, and the heart of Telemachus yearned as hebethought him of his father. Tears fell from his eyes as he heardhim thus mentioned, so that he held his cloak before his face withboth hands. When Menelaus saw this he doubted whether to let himchoose his own time for speaking, or to ask him at once and findwhat it was all about.

  • 郭生富 08-08

      With these words she made them all want to come, and they flocked tothe assembly till seats and standing room were alike crowded. Everyone was struck with the appearance of Ulysses, for Minerva hadbeautified him about the head and shoulders, making him look tallerand stouter than he really was, that he might impress the Phaeciansfavourably as being a very remarkable man, and might come off wellin the many trials of skill to which they would challenge him. Then,when they were got together, Alcinous spoke:

  • 詹姆斯韦伯 08-08

       And Ulysses said, "Nausicaa, daughter of great Alcinous, may Jovethe mighty husband of Juno, grant that I may reach my home; so shall Ibless you as my guardian angel all my days, for it was you who savedme."

  • 费广金 08-08

      Telemachus did as his father said, and went off to the store roomwhere the armour was kept. He chose four shields, eight spears, andfour brass helmets with horse-hair plumes. He brought them with allspeed to his father, and armed himself first, while the stockman andthe swineherd also put on their armour, and took their places nearUlysses. Meanwhile Ulysses, as long as his arrows lasted, had beenshooting the suitors one by one, and they fell thick on one another:when his arrows gave out, he set the bow to stand against the end wallof the house by the door post, and hung a shield four hides thickabout his shoulders; on his comely head he set his helmet, wellwrought with a crest of horse-hair that nodded menacingly above it,and he grasped two redoubtable bronze-shod spears.

  • 李济德 08-07

    {  Eurymachus was furious at all this. He scowled at him and cried,"You wretch, I will soon pay you out for daring to say such thingsto me, and in public too. Has the wine been getting into your heador do you always babble in this way? You seem to have lost your witsbecause you beat the tramp Irus. With this he caught hold of afootstool, but Ulysses sought protection at the knees of Amphinomus ofDulichium, for he was afraid. The stool hit the cupbearer on his righthand and knocked him down: the man fell with a cry flat on his back,and his wine-jug fell ringing to the ground. The suitors in thecovered cloister were now in an uproar, and one would turn towards hisneighbour, saying, "I wish the stranger had gone somewhere else, badluck to hide, for all the trouble he gives us. We cannot permit suchdisturbance about a beggar; if such ill counsels are to prevail weshall have no more pleasure at our banquet."

  • 托萨罗伦佐 08-06

      "My father is dead and gone," answered Telemachus, "and even if somerumour reaches me I put no more faith in it now. My mother does indeedsometimes send for a soothsayer and question him, but I give hisprophecyings no heed. As for the stranger, he was Mentes, son ofAnchialus, chief of the Taphians, an old friend of my father's." Butin his heart he knew that it had been the goddess.}

  • 李道演 08-06

      "On this the ghost of Teiresias went back to the house of Hades, forhis prophecyings had now been spoken, but I sat still where I wasuntil my mother came up and tasted the blood. Then she knew me at onceand spoke fondly to me, saying, 'My son, how did you come down to thisabode of darkness while you are still alive? It is a hard thing forthe living to see these places, for between us and them there aregreat and terrible waters, and there is Oceanus, which no man cancross on foot, but he must have a good ship to take him. Are you allthis time trying to find your way home from Troy, and have you neveryet got back to Ithaca nor seen your wife in your own house?'

  • 吕国栋 08-06

      This made them all very angry, for they feared he might string thebow; Antinous therefore rebuked him fiercely saying, "Wretchedcreature, you have not so much as a grain of sense in your whole body;you ought to think yourself lucky in being allowed to dine unharmedamong your betters, without having any smaller portion served you thanwe others have had, and in being allowed to hear our conversation.No other beggar or stranger has been allowed to hear what we say amongourselves; the wine must have been doing you a mischief, as it doeswith all those drink immoderately. It was wine that inflamed theCentaur Eurytion when he was staying with Peirithous among theLapithae. When the wine had got into his head he went mad and didill deeds about the house of Peirithous; this angered the heroes whowere there assembled, so they rushed at him and cut off his ears andnostrils; then they dragged him through the doorway out of thehouse, so he went away crazed, and bore the burden of his crime,bereft of understanding. Henceforth, therefore, there was warbetween mankind and the centaurs, but he brought it upon himselfthrough his own drunkenness. In like manner I can tell you that itwill go hardly with you if you string the bow: you will find nomercy from any one here, for we shall at once ship you off to kingEchetus, who kills every one that comes near him: you will never getaway alive, so drink and keep quiet without getting into a quarrelwith men younger than yourself."

  • 周厉王 08-05

       Thus spoke the stockman, and Ulysses struck the son of Damastor witha spear in close fight, while Telemachus hit Leocritus son of Evenorin the belly, and the dart went clean through him, so that he fellforward full on his face upon the ground. Then Minerva from her seaton the rafter held up her deadly aegis, and the hearts of thesuitors quailed. They fled to the other end of the court like a herdof cattle maddened by the gadfly in early summer when the days areat their longest. As eagle-beaked, crook-taloned vultures from themountains swoop down on the smaller birds that cower in flocks uponthe ground, and kill them, for they cannot either fight or fly, andlookers on enjoy the sport- even so did Ulysses and his men fallupon the suitors and smite them on every side. They made a horriblegroaning as their brains were being battered in, and the groundseethed with their blood.

  • 利朗 08-03

    {  "'I have heard nothing,' I answered, 'of Peleus, but I can tellyou all about your son Neoptolemus, for I took him in my own ship fromScyros with the Achaeans. In our councils of war before Troy he wasalways first to speak, and his judgement was unerring. Nestor and Iwere the only two who could surpass him; and when it came tofighting on the plain of Troy, he would never remain with the bodyof his men, but would dash on far in front, foremost of them all invalour. Many a man did he kill in battle- I cannot name every singleone of those whom he slew while fighting on the side of the Argives,but will only say how he killed that valiant hero Eurypylus son ofTelephus, who was the handsomest man I ever saw except Memnon; manyothers also of the Ceteians fell around him by reason of a woman'sbribes. Moreover, when all the bravest of the Argives went insidethe horse that Epeus had made, and it was left to me to settle when weshould either open the door of our ambuscade, or close it, thoughall the other leaders and chief men among the Danaans were dryingtheir eyes and quaking in every limb, I never once saw him turn palenor wipe a tear from his cheek; he was all the time urging me to breakout from the horse- grasping the handle of his sword and hisbronze-shod spear, and breathing fury against the foe. Yet when we hadsacked the city of Priam he got his handsome share of the prizemoney and went on board (such is the fortune of war) without a woundupon him, neither from a thrown spear nor in close combat, for therage of Mars is a matter of great chance.'

  • 罗通 08-03

      On this they rose and went to the water side. The crew then drew theship on shore; their servants took their armour from them, and theywent up in a body to the place of assembly, but they would not let anyone old or young sit along with them, and Antinous, son ofEupeithes, spoke first.

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