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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:斯科特-布鲁克斯 大小:qS7YFwrh25020KB 下载:CQn3Pc8350262次
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日期:2020-08-13 17:17:53
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "'Son of Atreus,' he answered, 'why ask me? You had better notknow what I can tell you, for your eyes will surely fill when you haveheard my story. Many of those about whom you ask are dead and gone,but many still remain, and only two of the chief men among theAchaeans perished during their return home. As for what happened onthe field of battle- you were there yourself. A third Achaean leaderis still at sea, alive, but hindered from returning. Ajax was wrecked,for Neptune drove him on to the great rocks of Gyrae; nevertheless, helet him get safe out of the water, and in spite of all Minerva'shatred he would have escaped death, if he had not ruined himself byboasting. He said the gods could not drown him even though they hadtried to do so, and when Neptune heard this large talk, he seizedhis trident in his two brawny hands, and split the rock of Gyrae intwo pieces. The base remained where it was, but the part on which Ajaxwas sitting fell headlong into the sea and carried Ajax with it; so hedrank salt water and was drowned.
2.  When she had done speaking Eumaeus went back to the suitors, forhe had explained everything. Then he went up to Telemachus and said inhis ear so that none could overhear him, "My dear sir, I will now goback to the pigs, to see after your property and my own business.You will look to what is going on here, but above all be careful tokeep out of danger, for there are many who bear you ill will. May Jovebring them to a bad end before they do us a mischief."
3.  As he spoke a sea broke over him with such terrific fury that theraft reeled again, and he was carried overboard a long way off. He letgo the helm, and the force of the hurricane was so great that it brokethe mast half way up, and both sail and yard went over into the sea.For a long time Ulysses was under water, and it was all he could do torise to the surface again, for the clothes Calypso had given himweighed him down; but at last he got his head above water and spat outthe bitter brine that was running down his face in streams. In spiteof all this, however, he did not lose sight of his raft, but swam asfast as he could towards it, got hold of it, and climbed on boardagain so as to escape drowning. The sea took the raft and tossed itabout as Autumn winds whirl thistledown round and round upon a road.It was as though the South, North, East, and West winds were allplaying battledore and shuttlecock with it at once.
4.  When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, Menelausrose and dressed himself. He bound his sandals on to his comelyfeet, girded his sword about his shoulders, and left his roomlooking like an immortal god. Then, taking a seat near Telemachus hesaid:
5.  Meanwhile Philoetius slipped quietly out and made fast the gatesof the outer court. There was a ship's cable of byblus fibre lyingin the gatehouse, so he made the gates fast with it and then came inagain, resuming the seat that he had left, and keeping an eye onUlysses, who had now got the bow in his hands, and was turning itevery way about, and proving it all over to see whether the wormshad been eating into its two horns during his absence. Then wouldone turn towards his neighbour saying, "This is some tricky oldbow-fancier; either he has got one like it at home, or he wants tomake one, in such workmanlike style does the old vagabond handle it."
6.  And Ulysses answered, "It would be a long story Madam, were I torelate in full the tale of my misfortunes, for the hand of heavenhas been laid heavy upon me; but as regards your question, there is anisland far away in the sea which is called 'the Ogygian.' Heredwells the cunning and powerful goddess Calypso, daughter of Atlas.She lives by herself far from all neighbours human or divine. Fortune,however, me to her hearth all desolate and alone, for Jove struck myship with his thunderbolts, and broke it up in mid-ocean. My bravecomrades were drowned every man of them, but I stuck to the keel andwas carried hither and thither for the space of nine days, till atlast during the darkness of the tenth night the gods brought me to theOgygian island where the great goddess Calypso lives. She took me inand treated me with the utmost kindness; indeed she wanted to makeme immortal that I might never grow old, but she could not persuade meto let her do so.

计划指导

1.  When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, the sons ofAutolycus went out with their hounds hunting, and Ulysses went too.They climbed the wooded slopes of Parnassus and soon reached itsbreezy upland valleys; but as the sun was beginning to beat upon thefields, fresh-risen from the slow still currents of Oceanus, they cameto a mountain dell. The dogs were in front searching for the tracks ofthe beast they were chasing, and after them came the sons ofAutolycus, among whom was Ulysses, close behind the dogs, and he had along spear in his hand. Here was the lair of a huge boar among somethick brushwood, so dense that the wind and rain could not get throughit, nor could the sun's rays pierce it, and the ground underneathlay thick with fallen leaves. The boar heard the noise of the men'sfeet, and the hounds baying on every side as the huntsmen came up tohim, so rushed from his lair, raised the bristles on his neck, andstood at bay with fire flashing from his eyes. Ulysses was the firstto raise his spear and try to drive it into the brute, but the boarwas too quick for him, and charged him sideways, ripping him above theknee with a gash that tore deep though it did not reach the bone. Asfor the boar, Ulysses hit him on the right shoulder, and the pointof the spear went right through him, so that he fell groaning in thedust until the life went out of him. The sons of Autolycus busiedthemselves with the carcass of the boar, and bound Ulysses' wound;then, after saying a spell to stop the bleeding, they went home asfast as they could. But when Autolycus and his sons had thoroughlyhealed Ulysses, they made him some splendid presents, and sent himback to Ithaca with much mutual good will. When he got back, hisfather and mother were rejoiced to see him, and asked him all aboutit, and how he had hurt himself to get the scar; so he told them howthe boar had ripped him when he was out hunting with Autolycus and hissons on Mount Parnassus.
2.  "Father Jove," answered the stockman, "would indeed that you mightso ordain it. If some god were but to bring Ulysses back, you shouldsee with what might and main I would fight for him."
3.  "Father, let me bring you a shield, two spears, and a brass helmetfor your temples. I will arm myself as well, and will bring otherarmour for the swineherd and the stockman, for we had better bearmed."
4.  "Sir, and all of you, farewell. Make your drink-offerings and sendme on my way rejoicing, for you have fulfilled my heart's desire bygiving me an escort, and making me presents, which heaven grant that Imay turn to good account; may I find my admirable wife living in peaceamong friends, and may you whom I leave behind me give satisfaction toyour wives and children; may heaven vouchsafe you every good grace,and may no evil thing come among your people."
5.  BOOK II.
6.  Telemachus saw Eumaeus long before any one else did, and beckonedhim to come and sit beside him; so he looked about and saw a seatlying near where the carver sat serving out their portions to thesuitors; he picked it up, brought it to Telemachus's table, and satdown opposite him. Then the servant brought him his portion, andgave him bread from the bread-basket.

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1.  "You are not my father, but some god is flattering me with vainhopes that I may grieve the more hereafter; no mortal man could ofhimself contrive to do as you have been doing, and make yourself oldand young at a moment's notice, unless a god were with him. A secondago you were old and all in rags, and now you are like some god comedown from heaven."
2.  To this Penelope replied, "Eurymachus, heaven robbed me of all mybeauty whether of face or figure when the Argives set sail for Troyand my dear husband with them. If he were to return and look aftermy affairs, I should both be more respected and show a better presenceto the world. As it is, I am oppressed with care, and with theafflictions which heaven has seen fit to heap upon me. My husbandforesaw it all, and when he was leaving home he took my right wrist inhis hand- 'Wife, 'he said, 'we shall not all of us come safe homefrom Troy, for the Trojans fight well both with bow and spear. Theyare excellent also at fighting from chariots, and nothing decidesthe issue of a fight sooner than this. I know not, therefore,whether heaven will send me back to you, or whether I may not fallover there at Troy. In the meantime do you look after things here.Take care of my father and mother as at present, and even more soduring my absence, but when you see our son growing a beard, thenmarry whom you will, and leave this your present home. This is what hesaid and now it is all coming true. A night will come when I shallhave to yield myself to a marriage which I detest, for Jove hastaken from me all hope of happiness. This further grief, moreover,cuts me to the very heart. You suitors are not wooing me after thecustom of my country. When men are courting a woman who they thinkwill be a good wife to them and who is of noble birth, and when theyare each trying to win her for himself, they usually bring oxen andsheep to feast the friends of the lady, and they make hermagnificent presents, instead of eating up other people's propertywithout paying for it."
3.  "'My friends,' said he, 'I have had a dream from heaven in my sleep.We are a long way from the ships; I wish some one would go down andtell Agamemnon to send us up more men at once.'
4.  "Thus, then, did we wait in great fear of mind till morning came,but when the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, themale sheep hurried out to feed, while the ewes remained bleating aboutthe pens waiting to be milked, for their udders were full to bursting;but their master in spite of all his pain felt the backs of all thesheep as they stood upright, without being sharp enough to find outthat the men were underneath their bellies. As the ram was goingout, last of all, heavy with its fleece and with the weight of mycrafty self; Polyphemus laid hold of it and said:
5.   "I understand and heed you," replied Eumaeus; "you need instructme no further, only I am going that way say whether I had not betterlet poor Laertes know that you are returned. He used to superintendthe work on his farm in spite of his bitter sorrow about Ulysses,and he would eat and drink at will along with his servants; but theytell me that from the day on which you set out for Pylos he hasneither eaten nor drunk as he ought to do, nor does he look afterhis farm, but sits weeping and wasting the flesh from off his bones."
6.  Meanwhile the daughter of Icarius, wise Penelope, had had had a richseat placed for her facing the court and cloisters, so that shecould hear what every one was saying. The dinner indeed had beenprepared amid merriment; it had been both good and abundant, forthey had sacrificed many victims; but the supper was yet to come,and nothing can be conceived more gruesome than the meal which agoddess and a brave man were soon to lay before them- for they hadbrought their doom upon themselves.

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1.  But Ulysses, when he had taken it up and examined it all over,strung it as easily as a skilled bard strings a new peg of his lyreand makes the twisted gut fast at both ends. Then he took it in hisright hand to prove the string, and it sang sweetly under his touchlike the twittering of a swallow. The suitors were dismayed, andturned colour as they heard it; at that moment, moreover, Jovethundered loudly as a sign, and the heart of Ulysses rejoiced as heheard the omen that the son of scheming Saturn had sent him.
2.  Then spoke the aged hero Echeneus who was one of the oldest menamong them, "My friends," said he, "what our august queen has justsaid to us is both reasonable and to the purpose, therefore bepersuaded by it; but the decision whether in word or deed restsultimately with King Alcinous."
3.  Then they stood on one side and went to tell the girl, while Ulysseswashed himself in the stream and scrubbed the brine from his backand from his broad shoulders. When he had thoroughly washed himself,and had got the brine out of his hair, he anointed himself with oil,and put on the clothes which the girl had given him; Minerva then madehim look taller and stronger than before, she also made the hairgrow thick on the top of his head, and flow down in curls likehyacinth blossoms; she glorified him about the head and shoulders as askilful workman who has studied art of all kinds under Vulcan andMinerva enriches a piece of silver plate by gilding it- and his workis full of beauty. Then he went and sat down a little way off upon thebeach, looking quite young and handsome, and the girl gazed on himwith admiration; then she said to her maids:
4、  "This dream, Madam," replied Ulysses, "can admit but of oneinterpretation, for had not Ulysses himself told you how it shall befulfilled? The death of the suitors is portended, and not one singleone of them will escape."
5、  "That night we rested and nursed our anger, for Jove was hatchingmischief against us. But in the morning some of us drew our ships intothe water and put our goods with our women on board, while the rest,about half in number, stayed behind with Agamemnon. We- the otherhalf- embarked and sailed; and the ships went well, for heaven hadsmoothed the sea. When we reached Tenedos we offered sacrifices to thegods, for we were longing to get home; cruel Jove, however, did notyet mean that we should do so, and raised a second quarrel in thecourse of which some among us turned their ships back again, andsailed away under Ulysses to make their peace with Agamemnon; but I,and all the ships that were with me pressed forward, for I saw thatmischief was brewing. The son of Tydeus went on also with me, andhis crews with him. Later on Menelaus joined us at Lesbos, and foundus making up our minds about our course- for we did not know whetherto go outside Chios by the island of Psyra, keeping this to ourleft, or inside Chios, over against the stormy headland of Mimas. Sowe asked heaven for a sign, and were shown one to the effect that weshould be soonest out of danger if we headed our ships across the opensea to Euboea. This we therefore did, and a fair wind sprang upwhich gave us a quick passage during the night to Geraestus, wherewe offered many sacrifices to Neptune for having helped us so far onour way. Four days later Diomed and his men stationed their ships inArgos, but I held on for Pylos, and the wind never fell light from theday when heaven first made it fair for me.

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  • 塔朱拉 08-12

      "Having so said she dived under the waves, whereon I turned backto the place where my ships were ranged upon the shore; and my heartwas clouded with care as I went along. When I reached my ship we gotsupper ready, for night was falling, and camped down upon the beach.

  • 葛花 08-12

      "Eumaeus, this house of Ulysses is a very fine place. No matterhow far you go you will find few like it. One building keeps followingon after another. The outer court has a wall with battlements allround it; the doors are double folding, and of good workmanship; itwould be a hard matter to take it by force of arms. I perceive, too,that there are many people banqueting within it, for there is asmell of roast meat, and I hear a sound of music, which the godshave made to go along with feasting."

  • 姚可成 08-12

       "And I said, 'Circe, no man with any sense of what is right canthink of either eating or drinking in your house until you have sethis friends free and let him see them. If you want me to eat anddrink, you must free my men and bring them to me that I may see themwith my own eyes.'

  • 吕斐宜 08-12

      "My friend," replied Ulysses, "you are very positive, and veryhard of belief about your master's coming home again, nevertheless Iwill not merely say, but will swear, that he is coming. Do not give meanything for my news till he has actually come, you may then give me ashirt and cloak of good wear if you will. I am in great want, but Iwill not take anything at all till then, for I hate a man, even as Ihate hell fire, who lets his poverty tempt him into lying. I swearby king Jove, by the rites of hospitality, and by that hearth ofUlysses to which I have now come, that all will surely happen as Ihave said it will. Ulysses will return in this self same year; withthe end of this moon and the beginning of the next he will be hereto do vengeance on all those who are ill treating his wife and son."

  • 娄音妮 08-11

    {  "It was day-break by the time she had done speaking, so shedressed me in my shirt and cloak. As for herself she threw a beautifullight gossamer fabric over her shoulders, fastening it with a goldengirdle round her waist, and she covered her head with a mantle. Then Iwent about among the men everywhere all over the house, and spokekindly to each of them man by man: 'You must not lie sleeping here anylonger,' said I to them, 'we must be going, for Circe has told meall about it.' And this they did as I bade them.

  • 杨正林 08-10

      As he spoke he went inside the buildings to the cloister where thesuitors were, but Argos died as soon as he had recognized his master.}

  • 王保安 08-10

      Leiodes then caught the knees of Ulysses and said, "Ulysses Ibeseech you have mercy upon me and spare me. I never wronged any ofthe women in your house either in word or deed, and I tried to stopthe others. I saw them, but they would not listen, and now they arepaying for their folly. I was their sacrificing priest; if you killme, I shall die without having done anything to deserve it, andshall have got no thanks for all the good that I did."

  • 王新祥 08-10

      But Minerva resolved to help Ulysses, so she bound the ways of allthe winds except one, and made them lie quite still; but she rouseda good stiff breeze from the North that should lay the waters tillUlysses reached the land of the Phaeacians where he would be safe.

  • 侯伍杰 08-09

       Thus did he speak, and they did even as he had said; they went tothe store room, which they entered before Melanthius saw them, forhe was busy searching for arms in the innermost part of the room, sothe two took their stand on either side of the door and waited. By andby Melanthius came out with a helmet in one hand, and an olddry-rotted shield in the other, which had been borne by Laertes whenhe was young, but which had been long since thrown aside, and thestraps had become unsewn; on this the two seized him, dragged him backby the hair, and threw him struggling to the ground. They bent hishands and feet well behind his back, and bound them tight with apainful bond as Ulysses had told them; then they fastened a nooseabout his body and strung him up from a high pillar till he wasclose up to the rafters, and over him did you then vaunt, Oswineherd Eumaeus, saying, "Melanthius, you will pass the night on asoft bed as you deserve. You will know very well when morning comesfrom the streams of Oceanus, and it is time for you to be driving inyour goats for the suitors to feast on."

  • 李京蔚 08-07

    {  Then Alcinous told Laodamas and Halius to dance alone, for there wasno one to compete with them. So they took a red ball which Polybus hadmade for them, and one of them bent himself backwards and threw itup towards the clouds, while the other jumped from off the groundand caught it with ease before it came down again. When they haddone throwing the ball straight up into the air they began to dance,and at the same time kept on throwing it backwards and forwards to oneanother, while all the young men in the ring applauded and made agreat stamping with their feet. Then Ulysses said:

  • 博尔济吉特·海兰珠 08-07

      Now there was a trap door on the wall, while at one end of thepavement there was an exit leading to a narrow passage, and thisexit was closed by a well-made door. Ulysses told Philoetius tostand by this door and guard it, for only one person could attack itat a time. But Agelaus shouted out, "Cannot some one go up to the trapdoor and tell the people what is going on? Help would come at once,and we should soon make an end of this man and his shooting."

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