0 下载讯腾棋牌-APP安装下载

下载讯腾棋牌 注册最新版下载

下载讯腾棋牌 注册

下载讯腾棋牌注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:赵炜 大小:LC2iMeqI15931KB 下载:YXZQS6Tb48409次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:TcEf3D1Z76201条
日期:2020-08-06 19:10:30
安卓
匡小颖

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Desires obtayned, but not fully satisfied, doe commonly urge morefrequent accesse, then wisedome thinkes expedient, or can continuewithout discovery. Our two joviall Nunnes, not a little proud of theirprivate stolne pleasures, so long resorted to the close Arbour, tillanother Sister, who had often observed their haunt thither, bymeanes of a little hole in her Window; that shee began to suspect themwith Massetto, and imparted the same to two other Sisters, all threeconcluding, to accuse them before the Lady Abbesse. But upon a furtherconference had with the Offenders, they changed opinion, tooke thesame oath as the forewomen had done; and because they would be freefrom any taxation at all: they revealed their adventures to theother three ignorants, and so fell all eight into one formallconfederacie, but by good and warie observation, least the Abbesse herselfe should descry them; finding poore Massetto such plenty ofGarden-worke, as made him verie doubtfull in pleasing them all.
2.  Gisippus having heard and seene the manner of this accident, was nota little joyfull, because he had now found a way to death, withoutlaying any violent hand on himselfe; for life being very loathsometo him, it was his only desire to die. Wherfore, he would not budgefrom the place, but taried there so long, till the Sergeants andOfficers of justice (by information of him that did the deede) camethither well attended, and furiously ledde Gisippus thence to prison.
3.  Gisippus remaining still at Athens, in small regard of eyther theirsor his owne friends: not long after by meanes of sundry troublesomeCitizens; and partialities happening among the common people, wasbanished from Athens, and hee, as also all his familie, condemned toperpetuall exile: during which tempestuous time, Gisippus was becomenot onely wretchedly poore, but wandred abroad as a common begger;in which miserable condition he travelled to Rome, to try if Tituswould take any acknowledgement of him. Understanding that he wasliving, and one most respected among the Romanes, as being a greatCommander and a Senator: he enquired for the place where hee dwelt,and going to be neere about his house, stayed there so long, tillTitus came home, yet not daring to manifest himselfe, or speake a wordto him, in regard of his poore and miserable estate, but strove tohave him see him, to the end, that hee might acknowledge and callhim by his name; notwithstanding, Titus passed by him without eitherspeech, or looking on him: Which when Gisippus perceived, and makingfull account, that (at the least) he would remember him, in regardof former courtesies, done to him: confounded with griefe anddesperate thoughtes, hee departed thence, never meaning to see him anymore.
4.  Neiphila cried out: "Mark this, Philostratus; in trying to teachus you might have had such a lesson as Masetto di Lamporechio had ofthe nuns, and recovered your speech just as your bare bones hadlearned to whistle without a master." Finding himself thus evenlymatched, Philostratus ceased his pleasantries; and beginning toconsider on the charge committed to his care, called the Master of thehoushold, to know in what estate all matters were, because where anydefect appeared, every thing might be the sooner remedied, for thebetter satisfaction of the company, during the time of hisauthority. Then returning backe to the assembly, thus he began. LovelyLadies, I would have you to know, that since the time of ability inme, to distinguish betweene good and evill, I have alwayes benesubject (perhaps by the meanes of some beauty heere among us) to theproud and imperious dominion of love, with expression of all duty,humility, and most intimate desire to please yet all hath prooved tono purpose, but still I have bin rejected for some other, whereby mycondition hath falne from ill to worse, and so still it is likely,even to the houre: of my death. In which respect, it best pleaseth me,that our conferences to morrow, shall extend to no other argument, bitonly such cases as are most conformable to my calamity, namely ofsuch, whose love hath had unhappy ending, because I await no otherissue of mine; nor willingly would I be called by any other name,but only, the miserable and unfortunate Lover.
5.  Calandrino continuing still in his angry humour, wringing his hands,and beating them upon his breast, said: Wretched man that I am, Whatshall I do? How shal I be delivered of this child? Which way can itcome from me into the world? I plainly perceyve, that I am noneother then a dead man, and all through the wickednesse of my Wife:heaven plague her with as many mischiefes, as I am desirous to findeease. Were I now in as good health, as heere-tofore I have beene, Iwould rise out of my bed, and never cease beating her, untill I hadbroken her in a thousand peeces. But if Fortune will be sofavourable to me, as to helpe mee out of this dangerous agony: hangme, if ever she get me under her againe, or make me such an Asse, inhaving the mastery over mee, as diuers times she hath done.
6.  This man, had a very faire and lovely wife, named Monna Tessa, thedaughter of Manuccio della Cuculia, wise and well advised; who knowingthe simplicity of her Husband, and affecting Frederigo di NeriPegolotti, who was a comely yong Gentleman, fresh, and in the floureof his time, even as she was, therefore they agreed the bettertogether. By meanes of her Chambermaid, Frederigo and shee met oftentogether, at a Countrie Farme of John of Lorraynes, which hee hadneere to Florence, and where she used to lodge all the Summer time,called Camerata, whether John resorted somtimes to Supper, and lodgefor a night, returning home againe to his City house the next morning;yet often he would stay there longer with his owne companions.

计划指导

1.  Nor did I make election of Guiscardo by chance, or rashly, as manywomen doe, but by deliberate counsell in my soule, and most matureadvise; I chose him above all other, and having his honestharmelesse conversation, mutually we enjoyed our hearts contentment.Now it appeareth, that I have not offended but by love; in imitationof vulgar opinion, rather then truth: you seeke to reprove mebitterly, alleaging no other maine argument for your anger, butonely my not choosing a Gentleman, or one more worthy. Wherein it ismost evident, that you do not so much checke my fault, as theordination of Fortune, who many times advanceth men of meanestesteeme, and abaseth them of greater merit. But leaving thisdiscourse, let us looke into the originall of things, wherein we arefirst to observe, that from one masse or lumpe of flesh, both we,and all other received our flesh, and one Creator hath created allthings; yea, all creatures, equally in their forces and faculties, andequall likewise in their vertue: which vertue was the first thatmade distinction of birth and equality, in regard, that such as havethe most liberall portion thereof, and performed actions theretoanswerable, were thereby tearmed noble; all the rest remainingunnoble: now although contrary use did afterward hide and concealethis Law, yet was it not therefore banished from Nature or goodmanners. In which respect, whosoever did execute all his actions byvertue, declared himselfe openly to be noble; and he that tearmedhim otherwise, it was an errour in the miscaller, and not in theperson so wrongfully called; as the very same priviledge is yet infull force among us at this day.
2.  When it was almost day, she heard a great noise of people travailingby, whereupon sodainly slie arose, and ranne into a Garden plot, whichwas on the backside of the poore Cottage, espying in one of thecorners a great stacke of Hay, wherein she hid her selfe, to theend, that travelling strangers might not readily finde her there inthe house. Scarsely was she fully hidden, but a great company ofTheeves and Villaines, finding the doore open, rushed into theCottage, where looking round about them for some booty, they saw theDamosels horse stand ready sadled, which made them demand to whom itbelonged. The good old man, not seeing the Maiden present there, butimmagining that she had made some shift for her selfe, answeredthus. Gentlemen, there is no body here but my wife and my selfe: asfor this Horse, which seemeth to be escaped from the Owner; hee camehither yesternight, and we gave him house-roome heere, rather thento be devoured by Wolves abroad. Then said the principall of theTheevish crew: This horse shall be ours, in regard he hath no otherMaster, and let the owner come claime him of us.
3.  Gerbino espying his gracious Mistresse on the Ships decke, and sheappearing to be farre more beautifull then Fame had made relation ofher: being much more enflamed now, then formerly he had bin, replyedthus when they shewed the Glove. We have (quoth he) no Faulcon herenow, to be humbled at the sight of your Glove: and therefore, if youwill not deliver the Lady, prepare your selves for fight, for wemust have her whether you will or no. Hereupon, they began to let flie(on both sides) their Darts and arrowes, with stones sent in violentsort from their slings, thus continuing the fight a long while, tovery great harme on either side. At the length, Gerbino perceiving,that small benefit would redound to him, if he did not undertakesome other kinde of course: he tooke a small Pinnace, whichpurposely he brought with him from Sardignia, and setting it on aflaming fire, conveyed it (by the Gallies help) close to the ship. TheSarazines much amazed thereat, and evidently perceiving, that eitherthey must yeeld or dye; brought their Kings daughter to the prow ofthe ship, most greevously weeping and wringing her hands. Then callingGerbino, to let him behold their resolution, there they slew hirbefore his face, and afterward, throwing her body into the Sea, saide:Take her, there we give her to thee, according to our bounden duty,and as thy perjury hath justly deserved.
4.  Pyrrhus had quickely brought the Axe, and hewing downe the tree,so soone as the Lady saw it fall; turning her selfe to Nicostratus,she said. Now that I have seene mine honour and honesties enemy laidalong; mine anger is past, and Husband, I freely pardon you:intreating you heartily henceforward, not to presume or imagine,that my love eyther is, or can bee altred from you.
5.  And gave command in spight,
6.  This sight was not a little greevous to the Prince Gerbino, whomadded now with this their monstrous cruelty, and not caring whatbecame of his owne life, having lost her for whom he onely desiredto live: not dreading their Darts, Arrowes, slinged stones, or whatviolence els they could use against him; he leapt aboord their ship,in despight of all that durst resist him, behaving himselfe there likea hunger-starved Lyon, when he enters among a heard of beasts, tearingtheir carkasses in pieces both with his teeth and pawes. Such wasthe extreme fury of this poore Prince, not sparing the life of anyone, that durst appeare in his presence; so that what with thebloody slaughter, and violence of the fires encreasing in the Ship;the Mariners got such wealth as possibly they could save, andsuffering the Sea to swallow the rest, Gerbino returned unto hisGallies againe, nothing proud of this so ill-gotten victory.

推荐功能

1.  Melisso marvelling at her froward answere, rebuked her for it invery kind manner: whereupon, Giosefo spake thus to her. I perceivewife, you are the same woman as you were wount to be: but beleeve meon my word, I shal quite alter you from this curst complexion. Soturning to Melisso, thus he proceeded. Noble friend, we shall tryanone, whether the counsell of King Salomon bee effectuall, or no; andI pray you, let it not be offensive to you to see it; but ratherhold all to be done in merriment. And because I would not behindered by you, doe but remember the answere which the Mulettergave us, when we tooke compassion on his Mule. Worthy friend,replyed Melisso, I am in your owne house, where I purpose not toimpeach whatsoever you doe.
2.  THEIR CHASTITIE IN MORE ESTEEME, THEN THE GREATNESSE AND
3.  Then the Children began to cry, saying; that they would tarriestil by the good olde man, because he loved them better then theirMaster did; whereat both the Lady and the Count began to smile. TheCount, a poore Begger, and not as Father to so great a Lady, arose,and did her humble reverence, because she was now a Noble Woman,conceyving wonderfull joy in his soule, to see her so faire and goodlya creature: yet could she take no knowledge of him, Age, want, andmisery had so mightily altered him; his head all white, his beardwithout any comly forme, his Garments so poore, and his face sowrinkled, leane and meager, that he seemed rather some Carter, thena Count. And Gianetta perceiving that when her Children were fetchtaway, they returned againe to the olde man, and would not leave him,she desired their Maister to let them alone.While thus the Children continued making much of the good olde man,Lord Andrew Mandevile, Father to Sir Roger, came into the Hall, asbeing so willed to doe by the Childrens Schoolemaster. He being ahastie-minded man, and one that ever-despised Gianetta before, butmuch more since her marriage to his sonne, angerly said; Let themalone with a mischeefe, and so befall them, their best company oughtto bee with beggers, for so they are bred and borne by the Mothersside: and therefore it is no mervaile, if like will to like, a beggersbrats to keepe company with beggers. The Count hearing thesecontemptible wordes, was not a little greeved thereat; and althoughhis courage was greater then his poore condition would permit him toexpresse; yet, clouding all injuries with noble patience, hangingdowne his head, and shedding many a salt teare, endured this reproach,as hee had done many, both before and after.
4.  Our wonderfull wise Geloso, who (very advisedly) considred that hehad wholly heard his wives secret confession, and dreamed now on noother doubt beside, but (perceiving by her speeches) how hee wasbecome a scorne to al men: without returning other answer, confirmedhis wife to be both wise and honest, and now when he hadde justoccasion to be jealous indeede, hee utterly forsware it, and countedthem all Coxcombes that would be so misguided. Wherefore, she havingthus wisely wonne the way to her owne desires, and he reduced into amore humane temper: I hope there was no more neede, of clambringover houses in the night time like Cats, nor walking in at gutterWindowes; but all abuses were honestly reformed.
5.   During the time of this their clamourous contending, the Judge beingvery willy willing to heare either party: Matteuzzo, upon a signereceived from the other, which was a word in Masoes pleading, laideholde on the broken boord, as also on the Judges low-hanging Breech,plucking at them both so strongly, that they fell downe immediately,the Breeches being onely tyed but with one Poynt before. He hearingthe boards breaking underneath him, and such maine pulling at hisBreeches; strove (as he sate) to make them fast before, but thePoynt being broken, and Maso crying in his eare on the one side, asRibi did the like in the other; hee was at his wits end to defendhimselfe. My Lord (quoth Maso) you may bee ashamed that you doe me notjustice, why will you not heare mee, but wholly lend your eare to mineAdversary? My Lord (said Ribi) never was Libell preferd into thisCourt, of such a paltry trifling matter, and therefore I must, andwill have Justice.
6.  So gently as possible he could, and with the helpe of his man, hetooke her forth of the monument, and layingher softly on his horsebefore him, conveighed her closely to his house in Bologna. SigniorGentile had a worthy Lady to his Mother, a woman of great wisdomeand vertue, who understanding by her Sonne, how matters hadhappened, moved with compassion, and suffering no one in the houseto know what was done, made a good fire, and very excellent Bathe,which recalled back againe wrongwandering life. Then fetching avehement sigh, opening her eyes, and looking very strangly abouther, she said. Alas! where am I now? whereto the good old Ladykindly replyed, saying. Comfort your selfe Madame, for you are in agood place.

应用

1.  THE SONG
2.  It is no little joy to mee, that we understand so well (by thediscourses already past) what power consisteth in the delivery of wiseand readie answeres; And because it is a great part of sence andjudgement in men, to affect women of greater birth and quality thenthemselves, as also an admirable fore-sight in women, to keepe offfrom being surprized in love, by Lords going beyond them in degree:a matter offereth it selfe to my memory, well deserving my speechand your attention, how a Gentlewoman (both in word and deede)should defend her honor in that kind, when importunity laboureth tobetray it.
3.  A Sister of this house once told me, that before her turne came tobe sent to the Soldane, she fell in frailty with a man that was bothlame and blinde, and discovering the same to her Ghostly Father inconfession; he absolved her of that sinne; affirming, that she had nottransgressed with a man, because he wanted his rationall andunderstanding parts. Behold Sister, heere lyes a creature, almostformed in the self-same mold, dumbe and deafe, which are two themost rationall and understanding parts that do belong to any man,and therefore no Man, wanting them. If folly and frailty would becommitted with him (as many times since hee came hither it hath run inmy minde) hee is by Nature, sworne to such secrecie, that he cannot(if he would) be a blabbe thereof. Beside, the Lawes andconstitution of our Religion doth teach us, that a sinne soassuredly concealed, is more then halfe absolved.
4、  But, because I would not speake particularly of all our fraile andhumane affections, I dare assure ye, that there is not any one ofthese desires to be elected among us mortals, with entire forsightor providence, warrantable against their ominous yssue. Wherefore,if we would walke directly, wee should dispose our willes andaffections, to be guided onely by him, who best knoweth what isneedfull for us, and will bestow them at his good pleasure. Nor let melay this blamefull imputation uppon men onely, for offending in manythrough over lavish desires: because you your selves (gracious Ladies)sinne highly in one, as namely, in coveting to be beautifull. Sothat it is not sufficient for you, to enjoy those beauties bestowne onyou by Nature; but you practice to increase them by the rarities ofArt. Wherefore, let it not offend you, that I tell you the hardfortune of a faire Sarazine, to whom it hapned by straunge adventures,that within the compasse of foure yeares, nine severall times to bemarried. and onely for her beauty.
5、  In this determination, wrapping a mantle about her head, and lyingdowne weeping in the boats bottome, she hourely expected her finallexpiration: but it fell out otherwise, and contrary to her desperateintention, because the wind turning to the North, and blowing verygently, without disturbing the Seas a jot, they conducted the smallBoat in such sort, that after the night of her entering into it, andthe morrowes sailing untill the evening, it came within an hundreleagues of Thunis and to a strond neere a Towne called Susa. The youngDamosell knew not whether she were on the sea or land; as one, who notby any accident hapning, lifted up her head to looke about her,neither intended ever to doe. Now it came to passe, that as theboate was driven to the shore, a poore woman stood at the Sea side,washing certaine Fishermens Nets; and seeing the boate comming towardsher under saile, without any person appearing in it, she wondredthereat not a little. It being close at the shore, and she thinkingthe Fishermen to be asleepe therein: stept boldly, and looked into theboate, where she saw not any body, but onely the poore distressedDamosell, whose sorrowes having brought her now into a sound sleepe,the woman gave many cals before she could awake her, which at thelength she did, and looked very strangely about her.

旧版特色

!

网友评论(OGX1pEcO53859))

  • 诺德拉姆 08-05

      When Sicurano heard this horrible lye, immediately shee conceived,that this was the occasion of her husbands hatred to her, and allthe hard haps which she had since suffered: whereupon, shee reputed itfor more then a mortall sinne, if such a villaine should passe withoutdue punishment. Sicurano seemed to like well this report, and grewinto such familiarity with Ambroginolo, that (by her perswasions) whenthe Fayre was ended, she tooke him higher with her into Alexandria,and all his Wares along with him, furnishing him with a fit andconvenient shop, where he made great benefite of his Merchandizes,trusting all his monies in the Captaines custody, because it was thesafest course for him, and so hee continued there with no meanecontentment.

  • 德佩思特 08-05

      And although they might then be knowne to very few, yet theinhabitants of the Country generally, understoode little or nothing atall of them. For there, the pure simplicitie of their ancientpredecessors still continuing; they had not seene any Parrots, or somuch as heard any speech of them. Wherefore the two crafty consorts,not a little joyfull of finding the Feather, tooke it thence withthem, and beecause they would not leave the Cabinet empty, espyingCharcoales lying in a corner of the Chamber, they filled it with them,wrapping it up againe in the Taffata, and in as demure manner asthey found it. So, away came they with the Feather, neither seene orsuspected by any one, intending now to heare what Friar Onyon wouldsay, uppon the losse of his precious Relique, and finding the Coalesthere placed insted thereof.

  • 阿布拉莫维奇 08-05

       Now, whether feeding on salt meates before his coming thither, orcustomary use of drinking, which maketh men unable any long while toabstaine as being never satisfied with excesse; which of these twoextreames they were, I know not: but drinke needs he must. And, havingno other meanes for quenching his thirst, espied the glasse of waterstanding in the Window, and thinking it to be some soveraigne kinde ofwater, reserved by the Doctor for his owne drinking, to make him lustyin his old yeeres, he tooke the glasse; and finding the water pleasingto his pallate, dranke it off every drop; then sitting downe on aCoffer by the beds side, soone after he fell into a sound sleepe,according to the powerfull working of the water.

  • 代罗特 08-05

      When the Feastivall was ended, she dwelling in the house of herFather, it was impossible for her to thinke on any thing else, butonely the love, which she had fixed on a person of such height. Andthat which most tormented her in this case, was the knowledge of herowne condition, being but meane and humble in degree; whereby sheconfessed, that she could not hope for any successefull issue of herproud love. Neverthelesse, she would not refraine from affecting theKing, who taking no note of this kindnesse in her, by anyperceivable meanes; must needs be the more regardles, which procured(by wary observation) her afflictions to be the greater andintollerable.

  • 文奇 08-04

    {  HONOURABLE OCCASION

  • 泰姬 08-03

      After that the Ladies had a while considered, on the communicationbetweene the two Wives of Sienna, and the falshood in friendship oftheir Husbands: the Queene, who was the last to recount her Novell,without offering injurie to Dioneus, began to speake thus.}

  • 孔丘 08-03

      It fortuned; that certaine Husbandmen, which had the charge ofPedroes Farmehouse in the Countrey, and there followed his affaires ofHusbandry, were returned home this instant night, having their Assesladen with such provision, as was to bee used in his City-house.When the Asses were unladen, and set up in a small Stable, withoutwatering; one off them being (belike) more thirsty then the rest,brake loose, and wandering all about smelling to seeke water, happenedinto the entry, where the young man lay hidden under the Hen pen. Now,hee being constrained (like a Carpe) to lye flat on his belly, becausethe Coope was over-weighty for him to carry, and one of his hands moreextended foorth, then was requisite for him in so urgent a shift: itwas his hap (or ill fortune rather) that the Asse set his foote on theyoung mans fingers, treading so hard, and the paine being veryirkesome to him, as hee was enforced to cry out aloude: which Pedrohearing, he wondered thereat not a little.

  • 雷锋哥 08-03

      That any other Love,

  • 罗姝 08-02

       No sooner did Constance behold him, but she was ready to dye withconceite of joy, and being unable to containe her passion: sodainelyshe threw her armes about his necke, and in meere compassion of hermany misfortunes, as also the instant solace of her soule (not beingable to utter one word) the teares trickled abundantly downe hercheekes. Martuccio also seeing his faire friend, was overcome withexceeding admiration, and stood awhile, as not knowing what to say;till venting forth a vehement sighe, thus he spake. My deerest loveConstance! Art thou yet living? It is a tedious long while since Iheard thou wast lost, and never any tydings knowne of thee in thineowne Fathers house. With which words, the teares standing in his eyes,most lovingly he embraced her, Constance recounted to him all herfortunes, and what kindnesse she had receyved from the SarazineLady, since her first houre of comming to her. And after much otherdiscourse passing betweene them, Martuccio departed from her, andreturning to the King his master, tolde him all the history of hisfortunes, and those beside of his Love Constance, being purposelyminded (with his gracious liking) to marry her according to theChristian Law.

  • 张五岳 07-31

    {  Lisana, whose lookes were dyed with a vermillian tincture, or ratherconverted into a pure maiden blush, reputing the Kings desire to beher owne; in a low and humbled voyce, thus answered. My Lord, mostcertaine am I, that if it had beene publikely knowne, how none butyour highnes, might serve for me to fixe my love on, I should havebeen termed the foole of all fooles: they perhaps beleeving, that Iwas forgetfull of my selfe, in being ignorant of mine ownecondition, and much lesse of yours. But the Gods are my witnesses(because they know the secrets of all hearts) that even in the veryinstant, when Loves fire tooke hold on my yeelding affection: I knewyou to be a King, and my selfe the daughter of poore Bernardo theApothecary: likewise, how farre unfitting it was for me, to be soambitious in my loves presuming. But I am sure your Majestie doth know(much better then I am able to expresse) that no one becommethamourous, according to the duty of election, but as the appetiteshapeth his course, against whose lawes my strength made manyresistances, which not prevailing, I presumed to love, did, and so forever shall doe, your Majestie.

  • 雷耶斯 07-31

      For truth lives not in men,

提交评论