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亚博ag确实~信誉靠谱 注册

亚博ag确实~信誉靠谱注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:焦其香 大小:z7uLMP3r87771KB 下载:aJS5Yg0i25317次
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日期:2020-08-10 05:17:37
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Thus did they converse, and presently Mercury came up to them withthe ghosts of the suitors who had been killed by Ulysses. The ghostsof Agamemnon and Achilles were astonished at seeing them, and wentup to them at once. The ghost of Agamemnon recognized Amphimedon sonof Melaneus, who lived in Ithaca and had been his host, so it began totalk to him.
2.  Phemius was still singing, and his hearers sat rapt in silence as hetold the sad tale of the return from Troy, and the ills Minerva hadlaid upon the Achaeans. Penelope, daughter of Icarius, heard hissong from her room upstairs, and came down by the great staircase, notalone, but attended by two of her handmaids. When she reached thesuitors she stood by one of the bearing posts that supported theroof of the cloisters with a staid maiden on either side of her. Sheheld a veil, moreover, before her face, and was weeping bitterly.
3.  "Nestor," said he, "son of Neleus, honour to the Achaean name, youask whence we come, and I will tell you. We come from Ithaca underNeritum, and the matter about which I would speak is of private notpublic import. I seek news of my unhappy father Ulysses, who is saidto have sacked the town of Troy in company with yourself. We know whatfate befell each one of the other heroes who fought at Troy, but asregards Ulysses heaven has hidden from us the knowledge even that heis dead at all, for no one can certify us in what place he perished,nor say whether he fell in battle on the mainland, or was lost atsea amid the waves of Amphitrite. Therefore I am suppliant at yourknees, if haply you may be pleased to tell me of his melancholy end,whether you saw it with your own eyes, or heard it from some othertraveller, for he was a man born to trouble. Do not soften thingsout of any pity for me, but tell me in all plainness exactly whatyou saw. If my brave father Ulysses ever did you loyal service, eitherby word or deed, when you Achaeans were harassed among the Trojans,bear it in mind now as in my favour and tell me truly all."
4.  "And I saw Tityus son of Gaia stretched upon the plain andcovering some nine acres of ground. Two vultures on either side of himwere digging their beaks into his liver, and he kept on trying to beatthem off with his hands, but could not; for he had violated Jove'smistress Leto as she was going through Panopeus on her way to Pytho.
5.  "Eumaeus, I hear footsteps; I suppose one of your men or some one ofyour acquaintance is coming here, for the dogs are fawning urn him andnot barking."
6.  "'Son of Atreus,' he answered, 'why ask me? You had better notknow what I can tell you, for your eyes will surely fill when you haveheard my story. Many of those about whom you ask are dead and gone,but many still remain, and only two of the chief men among theAchaeans perished during their return home. As for what happened onthe field of battle- you were there yourself. A third Achaean leaderis still at sea, alive, but hindered from returning. Ajax was wrecked,for Neptune drove him on to the great rocks of Gyrae; nevertheless, helet him get safe out of the water, and in spite of all Minerva'shatred he would have escaped death, if he had not ruined himself byboasting. He said the gods could not drown him even though they hadtried to do so, and when Neptune heard this large talk, he seizedhis trident in his two brawny hands, and split the rock of Gyrae intwo pieces. The base remained where it was, but the part on which Ajaxwas sitting fell headlong into the sea and carried Ajax with it; so hedrank salt water and was drowned.

计划指导

1.  "Father Jove," answered the stockman, "would indeed that you mightso ordain it. If some god were but to bring Ulysses back, you shouldsee with what might and main I would fight for him."
2.  And Eumaeus answered, "Antinous, your birth is good but your wordsevil. It was no doing of mine that he came here. Who is likely toinvite a stranger from a foreign country, unless it be one of thosewho can do public service as a seer, a healer of hurts, a carpenter,or a bard who can charm us with his Such men are welcome all the worldover, but no one is likely to ask a beggar who will only worry him.You are always harder on Ulysses' servants than any of the othersuitors are, and above all on me, but I do not care so long asTelemachus and Penelope are alive and here."
3.  Then Eurymachus, son of Polybus, answered, "It rests with heavento decide who shall be chief among us, but you shall be master in yourown house and over your own possessions; no one while there is a manin Ithaca shall do you violence nor rob you. And now, my goodfellow, I want to know about this stranger. What country does hecome from? Of what family is he, and where is his estate? Has hebrought you news about the return of your father, or was he onbusiness of his own? He seemed a well-to-do man, but he hurried off sosuddenly that he was gone in a moment before we could get to knowhim."
4.  Then, when they had finished their work and the meal was ready, theyate it, and every man had his full share so that all were satisfied.As soon as they had had enough to eat and drink, they laid down torest and enjoyed the boon of sleep.
5.  The maids looked at one another and laughed, while pretty Melanthobegan to gibe at him contemptuously. She was daughter to Dolius, buthad been brought up by Penelope, who used to give her toys to playwith, and looked after her when she was a child; but in spite of allthis she showed no consideration for the sorrows of her mistress,and used to misconduct herself with Eurymachus, with whom she was inlove.
6.  "Then," said Penelope, "if you are a god or have been sent here bydivine commission, tell me also about that other unhappy one- is hestill alive, or is he already dead and in the house of Hades?"

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1.  "Then send him away," said Mercury, "or Jove will be angry withyou and punish you"'
2.  "Take heart, and do not trouble yourself about that," rejoinedMinerva, "let us rather set about stowing your things at once in thecave, where they will be quite safe. Let us see how we can best manageit all."
3.  Thus spoke Antinous, but Telemachus heeded him not. Meanwhile theheralds were bringing the holy hecatomb through the city, and theAchaeans gathered under the shady grove of Apollo.
4.  Minerva answered, "Do not try to keep me, for I would be on my wayat once. As for any present you may be disposed to make me, keep ittill I come again, and I will take it home with me. You shall giveme a very good one, and I will give you one of no less value inreturn."
5.   "My poor fellow, you shall not stay here grieving and frettingyour life out any longer. I am going to send you away of my own freewill; so go, cut some beams of wood, and make yourself a large raftwith an upper deck that it may carry you safely over the sea. I willput bread, wine, and water on board to save you from starving. Iwill also give you clothes, and will send you a fair wind to takeyou home, if the gods in heaven so will it- for they know more aboutthese things, and can settle them better than I can."
6.  "The cruel wretch vouchsafed me not one word of answer, but with asudden clutch he gripped up two of my men at once and dashed them downupon the ground as though they had been puppies. Their brains wereshed upon the ground, and the earth was wet with their blood. Thenhe tore them limb from limb and supped upon them. He gobbled them uplike a lion in the wilderness, flesh, bones, marrow, and entrails,without leaving anything uneaten. As for us, we wept and lifted up ourhands to heaven on seeing such a horrid sight, for we did not knowwhat else to do; but when the Cyclops had filled his huge paunch,and had washed down his meal of human flesh with a drink of neat milk,he stretched himself full length upon the ground among his sheep,and went to sleep. I was at first inclined to seize my sword, draw it,and drive it into his vitals, but I reflected that if I did weshould all certainly be lost, for we should never be able to shift thestone which the monster had put in front of the door. So we stayedsobbing and sighing where we were till morning came.

应用

1.  "Telemachus, I shall go upstairs and lie down on that sad couch,which I have not ceased to water with my tears, from the day Ulyssesset out for Troy with the sons of Atreus. You failed, however, to makeit clear to me before the suitors came back to the house, whether orno you had been able to hear anything about the return of yourfather."
2.  Thus, then, the ship sped on her way through the watches of thenight from dark till dawn.
3.  "'Mother,' said I, 'I was forced to come here to consult the ghostof the Theban prophet Teiresias. I have never yet been near theAchaean land nor set foot on my native country, and I have had nothingbut one long series of misfortunes from the very first day that Iset out with Agamemnon for Ilius, the land of noble steeds, to fightthe Trojans. But tell me, and tell me true, in what way did you die?Did you have a long illness, or did heaven vouchsafe you a gentle easypassage to eternity? Tell me also about my father, and the son whomI left behind me; is my property still in their hands, or has some oneelse got hold of it, who thinks that I shall not return to claim it?Tell me again what my wife intends doing, and in what mind she is;does she live with my son and guard my estate securely, or has shemade the best match she could and married again?'
4、  To this Penelope said, "My dear sir, of all the guests who everyet came to my house there never was one who spoke in all thingswith such admirable propriety as you do. There happens to be in thehouse a most respectable old woman- the same who received my poor dearhusband in her arms the night he was born, and nursed him ininfancy. She is very feeble now, but she shall wash your feet.""Come here," said she, "Euryclea, and wash your master's age-mate; Isuppose Ulysses' hands and feet are very much the same now as his are,for trouble ages all of us dreadfully fast."
5、  "And I said, 'Circe, no man with any sense of what is right canthink of either eating or drinking in your house until you have sethis friends free and let him see them. If you want me to eat anddrink, you must free my men and bring them to me that I may see themwith my own eyes.'

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  • 巴加德 08-09

      Furthermore she went to the house of Ulysses, and threw thesuitors into a deep slumber. She caused their drink to fuddle them,and made them drop their cups from their hands, so that instead ofsitting over their wine, they went back into the town to sleep, withtheir eyes heavy and full of drowsiness. Then she took the form andvoice of Mentor, and called Telemachus to come outside.

  • 杨啓富 08-09

      "You are asleep, Penelope: the gods who live at ease will not sufferyou to weep and be so sad. Your son has done them no wrong, so he willyet come back to you."

  • 臧铁军 08-09

       To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "If these Achaeans,Madam, would only keep quiet, you would be charmed with the history ofhis adventures. I had him three days and three nights with me in myhut, which was the first place he reached after running away fromhis ship, and he has not yet completed the story of his misfortunes.If he had been the most heaven-taught minstrel in the whole world,on whose lips all hearers hang entranced, I could not have been morecharmed as I sat in my hut and listened to him. He says there is anold friendship between his house and that of Ulysses, and that hecomes from Crete where the descendants of Minos live, after havingbeen driven hither and thither by every kind of misfortune; he alsodeclares that he has heard of Ulysses as being alive and near athand among the Thesprotians, and that he is bringing great wealth homewith him."

  • 杨光明 08-09

      Thus he spoke, and Mercury, guide and guardian, slayer of Argus, didas he was told. Forthwith he bound on his glittering golden sandalswith which he could fly like the wind over land and sea. He took thewand with which he seals men's eyes in sleep or wakes them just ashe pleases, and flew holding it in his hand over Pieria; then heswooped down through the firmament till he reached the level of thesea, whose waves he skimmed like a cormorant that flies fishingevery hole and corner of the ocean, and drenching its thick plumage inthe spray. He flew and flew over many a weary wave, but when at lasthe got to the island which was his journey's end, he left the seaand went on by land till he came to the cave where the nymph Calypsolived.

  • 庄亨浩 08-08

    {  "The stranger," said Telemachus, "shall show me a light; when peopleeat my bread they must earn it, no matter where they come from."

  • 雅各布·格林 08-07

      "With this I left the ship and went up inland. When I got throughthe charmed grove, and was near the great house of the enchantressCirce, I met Mercury with his golden wand, disguised as a young man inthe hey-day of his youth and beauty with the down just coming upon hisface. He came up to me and took my hand within his own, saying, 'Mypoor unhappy man, whither are you going over this mountain top,alone and without knowing the way? Your men are shut up in Circe'spigsties, like so many wild boars in their lairs. You surely do notfancy that you can set them free? I can tell you that you will neverget back and will have to stay there with the rest of them. Butnever mind, I will protect you and get you out of your difficulty.Take this herb, which is one of great virtue, and keep it about youwhen you go to Circe's house, it will be a talisman to you againstevery kind of mischief.}

  • 黄长裕 08-07

      BOOK XXII.

  • 柳建志 08-07

      "I had hardly finished telling everything to the men before wereached the island of the two Sirens, for the wind had been veryfavourable. Then all of a sudden it fell dead calm; there was not abreath of wind nor a ripple upon the water, so the men furled thesails and stowed them; then taking to their oars they whitened thewater with the foam they raised in rowing. Meanwhile I look a largewheel of wax and cut it up small with my sword. Then I kneaded the waxin my strong hands till it became soft, which it soon did betweenthe kneading and the rays of the sun-god son of Hyperion. Then Istopped the ears of all my men, and they bound me hands and feet tothe mast as I stood upright on the crosspiece; but they went on rowingthemselves. When we had got within earshot of the land, and the shipwas going at a good rate, the Sirens saw that we were getting in shoreand began with their singing.

  • 王宏斌 08-06

       "He would not answer, but turned away to Erebus and to the otherghosts; nevertheless, I should have made him talk to me in spite ofhis being so angry, or I should have gone talking to him, only thatthere were still others among the dead whom I desired to see.

  • 王燕君 08-04

    {  And Penelope said, "If the gods are going to vouchsafe you a happiertime in your old age, you may hope then to have some respite frommisfortune."

  • 王世福 08-04

      "Meanwhile Lampetie went straight off to the sun and told him we hadbeen killing his cows, whereon he flew into a great rage, and saidto the immortals, 'Father Jove, and all you other gods who live ineverlasting bliss, I must have vengeance on the crew of Ulysses' ship:they have had the insolence to kill my cows, which were the onething I loved to look upon, whether I was going up heaven or downagain. If they do not square accounts with me about my cows, I will godown to Hades and shine there among the dead.'

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