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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:岛田正雄 大小:Pk5gRmKK92494KB 下载:hTlAVR0g98855次
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日期:2020-08-13 17:51:12
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薇薇恩·韦斯特伍德

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Then Penelope sprang up from her couch, threw her arms roundEuryclea, and wept for joy. "But my dear nurse," said she, "explainthis to me; if he has really come home as you say, how did he manageto overcome the wicked suitors single handed, seeing what a numberof them there always were?"
2.  Then Ulysses answered, "madam, wife of Ulysses, since you persist inasking me about my family, I will answer, no matter what it costsme: people must expect to be pained when they have been exiles as longas I have, and suffered as much among as many peoples. Nevertheless,as regards your question I will tell you all you ask. There is afair and fruitful island in mid-ocean called Crete; it is thicklypeopled and there are nine cities in it: the people speak manydifferent languages which overlap one another, for there are Achaeans,brave Eteocretans, Dorians of three-fold race, and noble Pelasgi.There is a great town there, Cnossus, where Minos reigned who everynine years had a conference with Jove himself. Minos was father toDeucalion, whose son I am, for Deucalion had two sons Idomeneus andmyself. Idomeneus sailed for Troy, and I, who am the younger, amcalled Aethon; my brother, however, was at once the older and the morevaliant of the two; hence it was in Crete that I saw Ulysses andshowed him hospitality, for the winds took him there as he was onhis way to Troy, carrying him out of his course from cape Malea andleaving him in Amnisus off the cave of Ilithuia, where the harboursare difficult to enter and he could hardly find shelter from the windsthat were then xaging. As soon as he got there he went into the townand asked for Idomeneus, claiming to be his old and valued friend, butIdomeneus had already set sail for Troy some ten or twelve daysearlier, so I took him to my own house and showed him every kind ofhospitality, for I had abundance of everything. Moreover, I fed themen who were with him with barley meal from the public store, andgot subscriptions of wine and oxen for them to sacrifice to theirheart's content. They stayed with me twelve days, for there was a galeblowing from the North so strong that one could hardly keep one's feeton land. I suppose some unfriendly god had raised it for them, buton the thirteenth day the wind dropped, and they got away."
3.  The foot races came first. The course was set out for them fromthe starting post, and they raised a dust upon the plain as they allflew forward at the same moment. Clytoneus came in first by a longway; he left every one else behind him by the length of the furrowthat a couple of mules can plough in a fallow field. They thenturned to the painful art of wrestling, and here Euryalus proved to bethe best man. Amphialus excelled all the others in jumping, while atthrowing the disc there was no one who could approach Elatreus.Alcinous's son Laodamas was the best boxer, and he it was whopresently said, when they had all been diverted with the games, "Letus ask the stranger whether he excels in any of these sports; he seemsvery powerfully built; his thighs, claves, hands, and neck are ofprodigious strength, nor is he at all old, but he has suffered muchlately, and there is nothing like the sea for making havoc with a man,no matter how strong he is."
4.  Pontonous mixed the wine and handed it to every one in turn; theothers each from his own seat made a drink-offering to the blessedgods that live in heaven, but Ulysses rose and placed the double cupin the hands of queen Arete.
5.  "Bless my heart," replied Menelaus, "then I am receiving a visitfrom the son of a very dear friend, who suffered much hardship formy sake. I had always hoped to entertain him with most markeddistinction when heaven had granted us a safe return from beyond theseas. I should have founded a city for him in Argos, and built him ahouse. I should have made him leave Ithaca with his goods, his son,and all his people, and should have sacked for them some one of theneighbouring cities that are subject to me. We should thus have seenone another continually, and nothing but death could haveinterrupted so close and happy an intercourse. I suppose, however,that heaven grudged us such great good fortune, for it has preventedthe poor fellow from ever getting home at all."
6.  "By this time my deep sleep had left me, and I turned back to theship and to the sea shore. As I drew near I began to smell hot roastmeat, so I groaned out a prayer to the immortal gods. 'Father Jove,' Iexclaimed, 'and all you other gods who live in everlasting bliss,you have done me a cruel mischief by the sleep into which you havesent me; see what fine work these men of mine have been making in myabsence.'

计划指导

1.  Irus began to be very uneasy as he heard them, but the servantsgirded him by force, and brought him [into the open part of the court]in such a fright that his limbs were all of a tremble. Antinousscolded him and said, "You swaggering bully, you ought never to havebeen born at all if you are afraid of such an old broken-down creatureas this tramp is. I say, therefore- and it shall surely be- if hebeats you and proves himself the better man, I shall pack you off onboard ship to the mainland and send you to king Echetus, who killsevery one that comes near him. He will cut off your nose and ears, anddraw out your entrails for the dogs to eat."
2.  "'Do not,' they exclaimed, 'be mad enough to provoke this savagecreature further; he has thrown one rock at us already which droveus back again to the mainland, and we made sure it had been thedeath of us; if he had then heard any further sound of voices he wouldhave pounded our heads and our ship's timbers into a jelly with therugged rocks he would have heaved at us, for he can throw them along way.'
3.  THEN Mercury of Cyllene summoned the ghosts of the suitors, and inhis hand he held the fair golden wand with which he seals men's eyesin sleep or wakes them just as he pleases; with this he roused theghosts and led them, while they followed whining and gibberingbehind him. As bats fly squealing in the hollow of some great cave,when one of them has fallen out of the cluster in which they hang,even so did the ghosts whine and squeal as Mercury the healer ofsorrow led them down into the dark abode of death. When they hadpassed the waters of Oceanus and the rock Leucas, they came to thegates of the sun and the land of dreams, whereon they reached themeadow of asphodel where dwell the souls and shadows of them thatcan labour no more.
4.  "Meanwhile Eurylochus had been giving evil counsel to the men,'Listen to me,' said he, 'my poor comrades. All deaths are badenough but there is none so bad as famine. Why should not we drivein the best of these cows and offer them in sacrifice to theimmortal Rods? If we ever get back to Ithaca, we can build a finetemple to the sun-god and enrich it with every kind of ornament; if,however, he is determined to sink our ship out of revenge for thesehomed cattle, and the other gods are of the same mind, I for one wouldrather drink salt water once for all and have done with it, than bestarved to death by inches in such a desert island as this is.'
5.  This was what they said, but they did not know what it was thathad been happening. The upper servant Eurynome washed and anointedUlysses in his own house and gave him a shirt and cloak, while Minervamade him look taller and stronger than before; she also made thehair grow thick on the top of his head, and flow down in curls likehyacinth blossoms; she glorified him about the head and shoulders justas a skilful workman who has studied art of all kinds under Vulcanor Minerva- and his work is full of beauty- enriches a piece of silverplate by gilding it. He came from the bath looking like one of theimmortals, and sat down opposite his wife on the seat he had left. "Mydear," said he, "heaven has endowed you with a heart more unyieldingthan woman ever yet had. No other woman could bear to keep away fromher husband when he had come back to her after twenty years ofabsence, and after having gone through so much. But come, nurse, get abed ready for me; I will sleep alone, for this woman has a heart ashard as iron."
6.  "'The third man,' he answered, 'is Ulysses who dwells in Ithaca. Ican see him in an island sorrowing bitterly in the house of thenymph Calypso, who is keeping him prisoner, and he cannot reach hishome for he has no ships nor sailors to take him over the sea. Asfor your own end, Menelaus, you shall not die in Argos, but the godswill take you to the Elysian plain, which is at the ends of the world.There fair-haired Rhadamanthus reigns, and men lead an easier lifethan any where else in the world, for in Elysium there falls not rain,nor hail, nor snow, but Oceanus breathes ever with a West wind thatsings softly from the sea, and gives fresh life to all men. Thiswill happen to you because you have married Helen, and are Jove'sson-in-law.'

推荐功能

1.  "And I said, 'Achilles, son of Peleus, foremost champion of theAchaeans, I came to consult Teiresias, and see if he could advise meabout my return home to Ithaca, for I have never yet been able toget near the Achaean land, nor to set foot in my own country, but havebeen in trouble all the time. As for you, Achilles, no one was everyet so fortunate as you have been, nor ever will be, for you wereadored by all us Argives as long as you were alive, and now that youare here you are a great prince among the dead. Do not, therefore,take it so much to heart even if you are dead.'
2.  "'You will want no guide,' she answered; 'raise you mast, set yourwhite sails, sit quite still, and the North Wind will blow you thereof itself. When your ship has traversed the waters of Oceanus, youwill reach the fertile shore of Proserpine's country with its grovesof tall poplars and willows that shed their fruit untimely; here beachyour ship upon the shore of Oceanus, and go straight on to the darkabode of Hades. You will find it near the place where the riversPyriphlegethon and Cocytus (which is a branch of the river Styx)flow into Acheron, and you will see a rock near it, just where the tworoaring rivers run into one another.
3.  BOOK X.
4.  Then Antinous said, "What god can have sent such a pestilence toplague us during our dinner? Get out, into the open part of the court,or I will give you Egypt and Cyprus over again for your insolenceand importunity; you have begged of all the others, and they havegiven you lavishly, for they have abundance round them, and it is easyto be free with other people's property when there is plenty of it."
5.   As she spoke Telemachus sneezed so loudly that the whole houseresounded with it. Penelope laughed when she heard this, and said toEumaeus, "Go and call the stranger; did you not hear how my sonsneezed just as I was speaking? This can only mean that all thesuitors are going to be killed, and that not one of them shall escape.Furthermore I say, and lay my saying to your heart: if I amsatisfied that the stranger is speaking the truth I shall give him ashirt and cloak of good wear."
6.  While Ulysses was thus yielding himself to a very deep slumberthat eased the burden of his sorrows, his admirable wife awoke, andsitting up in her bed began to cry. When she had relieved herself byweeping she prayed to Diana saying, "Great Goddess Diana, daughterof Jove, drive an arrow into my heart and slay me; or let somewhirlwind snatch me up and bear me through paths of darkness till itdrop me into the mouths of overflowing Oceanus, as it did thedaughters of Pandareus. The daughters of Pandareus lost their fatherand mother, for the gods killed them, so they were left orphans. ButVenus took care of them, and fed them on cheese, honey, and sweetwine. Juno taught them to excel all women in beauty of form andunderstanding; Diana gave them an imposing presence, and Minervaendowed them with every kind of accomplishment; but one day when Venushad gone up to Olympus to see Jove about getting them married (forwell does he know both what shall happen and what not happen toevery one) the storm winds came and spirited them away to becomehandmaids to the dread Erinyes. Even so I wish that the gods wholive in heaven would hide me from mortal sight, or that fair Dianamight strike me, for I would fain go even beneath the sad earth if Imight do so still looking towards Ulysses only, and without havingto yield myself to a worse man than he was. Besides, no matter howmuch people may grieve by day, they can put up with it so long as theycan sleep at night, for when the eyes are closed in slumber peopleforget good and ill alike; whereas my misery haunts me even in mydreams. This very night methought there was one lying by my side whowas like Ulysses as he was when he went away with his host, and Irejoiced, for I believed that it was no dream, but the very truthitself."

应用

1.  The suitors bit their lips as they heard him, and marvelled at theboldness of his speech. Then, Antinous, son of Eupeithes, said, "Thegods seem to have given you lessons in bluster and tall talking; mayJove never grant you to be chief in Ithaca as your father was beforeyou."
2.  Furthermore she went to the house of Ulysses, and threw thesuitors into a deep slumber. She caused their drink to fuddle them,and made them drop their cups from their hands, so that instead ofsitting over their wine, they went back into the town to sleep, withtheir eyes heavy and full of drowsiness. Then she took the form andvoice of Mentor, and called Telemachus to come outside.
3.  "We do not know, Piraeus," answered Telemachus, "what may happen. Ifthe suitors kill me in my own house and divide my property among them,I would rather you had the presents than that any of those peopleshould get hold of them. If on the other hand I manage to kill them, Ishall be much obliged if you will kindly bring me my presents."
4、  Ulysses went back to his own place, and Eumaeus strewed some greenbrushwood on the floor and threw a sheepskin on top of it forTelemachus to sit upon. Then the swineherd brought them platters ofcold meat, the remains from what they had eaten the day before, and hefilled the bread baskets with bread as fast as he could. He mixed winealso in bowls of ivy-wood, and took his seat facing Ulysses. Then theylaid their hands on the good things that were before them, and as soonas they had had enough to eat and drink Telemachus said to Eumaeus,"Old friend, where does this stranger come from? How did his crewbring him to Ithaca, and who were they?-for assuredly he did notcome here by land"'
5、  "And now, tell me and tell me true. Where have you been wandering,and in what countries have you travelled? Tell us of the peoplesthemselves, and of their cities- who were hostile, savage anduncivilized, and who, on the other hand, hospitable and humane. Tellus also why you are made unhappy on hearing about the return of theArgive Danaans from Troy. The gods arranged all this, and sent themtheir misfortunes in order that future generations might havesomething to sing about. Did you lose some brave kinsman of yourwife's when you were before Troy? a son-in-law or father-in-law- whichare the nearest relations a man has outside his own flesh and blood?or was it some brave and kindly-natured comrade- for a good friendis as dear to a man as his own brother?"

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  • 王仁华 08-12

      "We do not know, Piraeus," answered Telemachus, "what may happen. Ifthe suitors kill me in my own house and divide my property among them,I would rather you had the presents than that any of those peopleshould get hold of them. If on the other hand I manage to kill them, Ishall be much obliged if you will kindly bring me my presents."

  • 李升平 08-12

      Telemachus saw her long before any one else did. He was sittingmoodily among the suitors thinking about his brave father, and howhe would send them flying out of the house, if he were to come tohis own again and be honoured as in days gone by. Thus brooding ashe sat among them, he caught sight of Minerva and went straight to thegate, for he was vexed that a stranger should be kept waiting foradmittance. He took her right hand in his own, and bade her give himher spear. "Welcome," said he, "to our house, and when you havepartaken of food you shall tell us what you have come for."

  • 张朝华 08-12

       "As spoke he drove the ram outside, but when we were a little wayout from the cave and yards, I first got from under the ram's belly,and then freed my comrades; as for the sheep, which were very fat,by constantly heading them in the right direction we managed todrive them down to the ship. The crew rejoiced greatly at seeing thoseof us who had escaped death, but wept for the others whom theCyclops had killed. However, I made signs to them by nodding andfrowning that they were to hush their crying, and told them to get allthe sheep on board at once and put out to sea; so they went aboard,took their places, and smote the grey sea with their oars. Then,when I had got as far out as my voice would reach, I began to jeerat the Cyclops.

  • 徐沛亮 08-12

      "Thus did they speak and I assented. Thereon through the livelongday to the going down of the sun we feasted our fill on meat and wine,but when the sun went down and it came on dark the men laid themselvesdown to sleep in the covered cloisters. I, however, after I had gotinto bed with Circe, besought her by her knees, and the goddesslistened to what I had got to say. 'Circe,' said I, 'please to keepthe promise you made me about furthering me on my homeward voyage. Iwant to get back and so do my men, they are always pestering me withtheir complaints as soon as ever your back is turned.'

  • 李育 08-11

    {  THEN Mercury of Cyllene summoned the ghosts of the suitors, and inhis hand he held the fair golden wand with which he seals men's eyesin sleep or wakes them just as he pleases; with this he roused theghosts and led them, while they followed whining and gibberingbehind him. As bats fly squealing in the hollow of some great cave,when one of them has fallen out of the cluster in which they hang,even so did the ghosts whine and squeal as Mercury the healer ofsorrow led them down into the dark abode of death. When they hadpassed the waters of Oceanus and the rock Leucas, they came to thegates of the sun and the land of dreams, whereon they reached themeadow of asphodel where dwell the souls and shadows of them thatcan labour no more.

  • 梁爽 08-10

      Thus spoke the stockman, and Ulysses struck the son of Damastor witha spear in close fight, while Telemachus hit Leocritus son of Evenorin the belly, and the dart went clean through him, so that he fellforward full on his face upon the ground. Then Minerva from her seaton the rafter held up her deadly aegis, and the hearts of thesuitors quailed. They fled to the other end of the court like a herdof cattle maddened by the gadfly in early summer when the days areat their longest. As eagle-beaked, crook-taloned vultures from themountains swoop down on the smaller birds that cower in flocks uponthe ground, and kill them, for they cannot either fight or fly, andlookers on enjoy the sport- even so did Ulysses and his men fallupon the suitors and smite them on every side. They made a horriblegroaning as their brains were being battered in, and the groundseethed with their blood.}

  • 王明竹 08-10

      "Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, so you would start home to yourown land at once? Good luck go with you, but if you could only knowhow much suffering is in store for you before you get back to your owncountry, you would stay where you are, keep house along with me, andlet me make you immortal, no matter how anxious you may be to see thiswife of yours, of whom you are thinking all the time day after day;yet I flatter myself that at am no whit less tall or well-looking thanshe is, for it is not to be expected that a mortal woman shouldcompare in beauty with an immortal."

  • 周先强 08-10

      ULYSSES was left in the cloister, pondering on the means wherebywith Minerva's help he might be able to kill the suitors. Presently hesaid to Telemachus, "Telemachus, we must get the armour together andtake it down inside. Make some excuse when the suitors ask you why youhave removed it. Say that you have taken it to be out of the way ofthe smoke, inasmuch as it is no longer what it was when Ulysses wentaway, but has become soiled and begrimed with soot. Add to this moreparticularly that you are afraid Jove may set them on to quarrelover their wine, and that they may do each other some harm which maydisgrace both banquet and wooing, for the sight of arms sometimestempts people to use them."

  • 葛根 08-09

       "So she swore at once as I had told her, and when she hadcompleted her oath then I went to bed with her.

  • 倪霞 08-07

    {  "Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, so you would start home to yourown land at once? Good luck go with you, but if you could only knowhow much suffering is in store for you before you get back to your owncountry, you would stay where you are, keep house along with me, andlet me make you immortal, no matter how anxious you may be to see thiswife of yours, of whom you are thinking all the time day after day;yet I flatter myself that at am no whit less tall or well-looking thanshe is, for it is not to be expected that a mortal woman shouldcompare in beauty with an immortal."

  • 熊诗婕 08-07

      "Listen to me," he cried, "you suitors of Queen Penelope, that I mayspeak even as I am minded. A man knows neither ache nor pain if hegets hit while fighting for his money, or for his sheep or his cattle;and even so Antinous has hit me while in the service of my miserablebelly, which is always getting people into trouble. Still, if the poorhave gods and avenging deities at all, I pray them that Antinous maycome to a bad end before his marriage."

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