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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:马丁路德·金 大小:nAA4UieS29879KB 下载:qYXtFTJw24114次
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日期:2020-08-04 03:14:27
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李多庆

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  BOOK XXII.
2.  Eurymachus son of Polybus then said, "Go home, old man, and prophesyto your own children, or it may be worse for them. I can read theseomens myself much better than you can; birds are always flying aboutin the sunshine somewhere or other, but they seldom mean anything.Ulysses has died in a far country, and it is a pity you are not deadalong with him, instead of prating here about omens and adding fuel tothe anger of Telemachus which is fierce enough as it is. I suppose youthink he will give you something for your family, but I tell you-and it shall surely be- when an old man like you, who should knowbetter, talks a young one over till he becomes troublesome, in thefirst place his young friend will only fare so much the worse- he willtake nothing by it, for the suitors will prevent this- and in thenext, we will lay a heavier fine, sir, upon yourself than you willat all like paying, for it will bear hardly upon you. As forTelemachus, I warn him in the presence of you all to send his motherback to her father, who will find her a husband and provide her withall the marriage gifts so dear a daughter may expect. Till we shall goon harassing him with our suit; for we fear no man, and care neitherfor him, with all his fine speeches, nor for any fortune-telling ofyours. You may preach as much as you please, but we shall only hateyou the more. We shall go back and continue to eat up Telemachus'sestate without paying him, till such time as his mother leaves offtormenting us by keeping us day after day on the tiptoe ofexpectation, each vying with the other in his suit for a prize of suchrare perfection. Besides we cannot go after the other women whom weshould marry in due course, but for the way in which she treats us."
3.  "Listen to me," replied Ulysses, "and think whether Minerva andher father Jove may seem sufficient, or whether I am to try and findsome one else as well."
4.  "O queen," he said, "I implore your aid- but tell me, are you agoddess or are you a mortal woman? If you are a goddess and dwell inheaven, I can only conjecture that you are Jove's daughter Diana,for your face and figure resemble none but hers; if on the otherhand you are a mortal and live on earth, thrice happy are yourfather and mother- thrice happy, too, are your brothers and sisters;how proud and delighted they must feel when they see so fair a scionas yourself going out to a dance; most happy, however, of all willhe be whose wedding gifts have been the richest, and who takes youto his own home. I never yet saw any one so beautiful, neither man norwoman, and am lost in admiration as I behold you. I can only compareyou to a young palm tree which I saw when I was at Delos growingnear the altar of Apollo- for I was there, too, with much people afterme, when I was on that journey which has been the source of all mytroubles. Never yet did such a young plant shoot out of the groundas that was, and I admired and wondered at it exactly as I nowadmire and wonder at yourself. I dare not clasp your knees, but I amin great distress; yesterday made the twentieth day that I had beentossing about upon the sea. The winds and waves have taken me allthe way from the Ogygian island, and now fate has flung me upon thiscoast that I may endure still further suffering; for I do not thinkthat I have yet come to the end of it, but rather that heaven hasstill much evil in store for me.
5.  Thus did he pray. Jove heard his prayer and forthwith thundered highup among the from the splendour of Olympus, and Ulysses was gladwhen he heard it. At the same time within the house, a miller-womanfrom hard by in the mill room lifted up her voice and gave him anothersign. There were twelve miller-women whose business it was to grindwheat and barley which are the staff of life. The others had groundtheir task and had gone to take their rest, but this one had not yetfinished, for she was not so strong as they were, and when she heardthe thunder she stopped grinding and gave the sign to her master."Father Jove," said she, "you who rule over heaven and earth, you havethundered from a clear sky without so much as a cloud in it, andthis means something for somebody; grant the prayer, then, of meyour poor servant who calls upon you, and let this be the very lastday that the suitors dine in the house of Ulysses. They have worn meout with the labour of grinding meal for them, and I hope they maynever have another dinner anywhere at all."
6.  On either side there stood gold and silver mastiffs which Vulcan,with his consummate skill, had fashioned expressly to keep watchover the palace of king Alcinous; so they were immortal and couldnever grow old. Seats were ranged all along the wall, here and therefrom one end to the other, with coverings of fine woven work which thewomen of the house had made. Here the chief persons of the Phaeciansused to sit and eat and drink, for there was abundance at all seasons;and there were golden figures of young men with lighted torches intheir hands, raised on pedestals, to give light by night to thosewho were at table. There are fifty maid servants in the house, some ofwhom are always grinding rich yellow grain at the mill, while otherswork at the loom, or sit and spin, and their shuttles go, backwardsand forwards like the fluttering of aspen leaves, while the linen isso closely woven that it will turn oil. As the Phaecians are thebest sailors in the world, so their women excel all others in weaving,for Minerva has taught them all manner of useful arts, and they arevery intelligent.

计划指导

1.  "'You will find the other rocks lie lower, but they are so closetogether that there is not more than a bowshot between them. [Alarge fig tree in full leaf grows upon it], and under it lies thesucking whirlpool of Charybdis. Three times in the day does shevomit forth her waters, and three times she sucks them down again; seethat you be not there when she is sucking, for if you are, Neptunehimself could not save you; you must hug the Scylla side and driveship by as fast as you can, for you had better lose six men thanyour whole crew.'
2.  This was what he said, and more than half raised a loud shout, andat once left the assembly. But the rest stayed where they were, forthe speech of Halitherses displeased them, and they sided withEupeithes; they therefore hurried off for their armour, and whenthey had armed themselves, they met together in front of the city, andEupeithes led them on in their folly. He thought he was going toavenge the murder of his son, whereas in truth he was never to return,but was himself to perish in his attempt.
3.  "This was what she said, and we assented; whereon we could see herworking on her great web all day long, but at night she would unpickthe stitches again by torchlight. She fooled us in this way forthree years and we never found her out, but as time wore on and shewas now in her fourth year, one of her maids who knew what she wasdoing told us, and we caught her in the act of undoing her work, soshe had to finish it whether she would or no. The suitors,therefore, make you this answer, that both you and the Achaeans mayunderstand-'Send your mother away, and bid her marry the man of herown and of her father's choice'; for I do not know what will happen ifshe goes on plaguing us much longer with the airs she gives herself onthe score of the accomplishments Minerva has taught her, and becauseshe is so clever. We never yet heard of such a woman; we know allabout Tyro, Alcmena, Mycene, and the famous women of old, but theywere nothing to your mother, any one of them. It was not fair of herto treat us in that way, and as long as she continues in the mind withwhich heaven has now endowed her, so long shall we go on eating upyour estate; and I do not see why she should change, for she getsall the honour and glory, and it is you who pay for it, not she.Understand, then, that we will not go back to our lands, neitherhere nor elsewhere, till she has made her choice and married someone or other of us."
4.  Meantime the suitors went on board and sailed their ways over thesea, intent on murdering Telemachus. Now there is a rocky islet calledAsteris, of no great size, in mid channel between Ithaca and Samos,and there is a harbour on either side of it where a ship can lie. Herethen the Achaeans placed themselves in ambush.
5.  "On this he lifted up his hands to the firmament of heaven andprayed, saying, 'Hear me, great Neptune; if I am indeed your owntrue-begotten son, grant that Ulysses may never reach his homealive; or if he must get back to his friends at last, let him do solate and in sore plight after losing all his men [let him reach hishome in another man's ship and find trouble in his house.']
6.  "My poor fellow, you shall not stay here grieving and frettingyour life out any longer. I am going to send you away of my own freewill; so go, cut some beams of wood, and make yourself a large raftwith an upper deck that it may carry you safely over the sea. I willput bread, wine, and water on board to save you from starving. Iwill also give you clothes, and will send you a fair wind to takeyou home, if the gods in heaven so will it- for they know more aboutthese things, and can settle them better than I can."

推荐功能

1.  They did as they were told, and set food before Ulysses, who ate anddrank ravenously, for it was long since he had had food of any kind.Meanwhile, Nausicaa bethought her of another matter. She got the linenfolded and placed in the waggon, she then yoked the mules, and, as shetook her seat, she called Ulysses:
2.  "Alas," he exclaimed, "among what manner of people am I fallen?Are they savage and uncivilized or hospitable and humane? Whereshall I put all this treasure, and which way shall I go? I wish Ihad stayed over there with the Phaeacians; or I could have gone tosome other great chief who would have been good to me and given mean escort. As it is I do not know where to put my treasure, and Icannot leave it here for fear somebody else should get hold of it.In good truth the chiefs and rulers of the Phaeacians have not beendealing fairly by me, and have left me in the wrong country; they saidthey would take me back to Ithaca and they have not done so: mayJove the protector of suppliants chastise them, for he watches overeverybody and punishes those who do wrong. Still, I suppose I mustcount my goods and see if the crew have gone off with any of them."
3.  BOOK VII.
4.  "Alcinous," answered Ulysses, "there is a time for makingspeeches, and a time for going to bed; nevertheless, since you sodesire, I will not refrain from telling you the still sadder tale ofthose of my comrades who did not fall fighting with the Trojans, butperished on their return, through the treachery of a wicked woman.
5.   THEN, when we had got down to the sea shore we drew our ship intothe water and got her mast and sails into her; we also put the sheepon board and took our places, weeping and in great distress of mind.Circe, that great and cunning goddess, sent us a fair wind that blewdead aft and stayed steadily with us keeping our sails all the timewell filled; so we did whatever wanted doing to the ship's gear andlet her go as the wind and helmsman headed her. All day long her sailswere full as she held her course over the sea, but when the sun wentdown and darkness was over all the earth, we got into the deepwaters of the river Oceanus, where lie the land and city of theCimmerians who live enshrouded in mist and darkness which the raysof the sun never pierce neither at his rising nor as he goes downagain out of the heavens, but the poor wretches live in one longmelancholy night. When we got there we beached the ship, took thesheep out of her, and went along by the waters of Oceanus till we cameto the place of which Circe had told us.
6.  And Jove said, "My child, what are you talking about? How can Iforget Ulysses than whom there is no more capable man on earth, normore liberal in his offerings to the immortal gods that live inheaven? Bear in mind, however, that Neptune is still furious withUlysses for having blinded an eye of Polyphemus king of theCyclopes. Polyphemus is son to Neptune by the nymph Thoosa, daughterto the sea-king Phorcys; therefore though he will not kill Ulyssesoutright, he torments him by preventing him from getting home.Still, let us lay our heads together and see how we can help him toreturn; Neptune will then be pacified, for if we are all of a mindhe can hardly stand out against us."

应用

1.  As he spoke day began to break, and Menelaus, who had already risen,leaving Helen in bed, came towards them. When Telemachus saw him heput on his shirt as fast as he could, threw a great cloak over hisshoulders, and went out to meet him. "Menelaus," said he, "let me goback now to my own country, for I want to get home."
2.  Penelope was moved still more deeply as she heard the indisputableproofs that Ulysses laid before her; and when she had again foundrelief in tears she said to him, "Stranger, I was already disposedto pity you, but henceforth you shall be honoured and made welcomein my house. It was I who gave Ulysses the clothes you speak of. Itook them out of the store room and folded them up myself, and Igave him also the gold brooch to wear as an ornament. Alas! I shallnever welcome him home again. It was by an ill fate that he ever setout for that detested city whose very name I cannot bring myselfeven to mention."
3.  When earth-encircling Neptune heard this he went to Scheria wherethe Phaecians live, and stayed there till the ship, which was makingrapid way, had got close-in. Then he went up to it, turned it intostone, and drove it down with the flat of his hand so as to root it inthe ground. After this he went away.
4、  Telemachus and the son of Nestor stayed their horses at the gate,whereon Eteoneus servant to Menelaus came out, and as soon as he sawthem ran hurrying back into the house to tell his Master. He wentclose up to him and said, "Menelaus, there are some strangers comehere, two men, who look like sons of Jove. What are we to do? Shall wetake their horses out, or tell them to find friends elsewhere asthey best can?"
5、  "Thence we sailed sadly on till the men were worn out with longand fruitless rowing, for there was no longer any wind to help them.Six days, night and day did we toil, and on the seventh day we reachedthe rocky stronghold of Lamus- Telepylus, the city of theLaestrygonians, where the shepherd who is driving in his sheep andgoats [to be milked] salutes him who is driving out his flock [tofeed] and this last answers the salute. In that country a man whocould do without sleep might earn double wages, one as a herdsman ofcattle, and another as a shepherd, for they work much the same bynight as they do by day.

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  • 汪东城 08-03

      As spoke he took Telemachus' spear, whereon he crossed the stonethreshold and came inside. Ulysses rose from his seat to give himplace as he entered, but Telemachus checked him; "Sit down, stranger."said he, "I can easily find another seat, and there is one here whowill lay it for me."

  • 杨志强 08-03

      Thus did he speak. The others all of them applauded his saying,and sent their servants to fetch the presents. Then Euryalus said,"King Alcinous, I will give the stranger all the satisfaction yourequire. He shall have sword, which is of bronze, all but the hilt,which is of silver. I will also give him the scabbard of newly sawnivory into which it fits. It will be worth a great deal to him."

  • 杨慎 08-03

       "Do not wake her yet," answered Ulysses, "but tell the women whohave misconducted themselves to come to me."

  • 叶斌 08-03

      Then Minerva said, "Father, son of Saturn, King of kings, itserved Aegisthus right, and so it would any one else who does as hedid; but Aegisthus is neither here nor there; it is for Ulysses thatmy heart bleeds, when I think of his sufferings in that lonelysea-girt island, far away, poor man, from all his friends. It is anisland covered with forest, in the very middle of the sea, and agoddess lives there, daughter of the magician Atlas, who looks afterthe bottom of the ocean, and carries the great columns that keepheaven and earth asunder. This daughter of Atlas has got hold ofpoor unhappy Ulysses, and keeps trying by every kind of blandishmentto make him forget his home, so that he is tired of life, and thinksof nothing but how he may once more see the smoke of his own chimneys.You, sir, take no heed of this, and yet when Ulysses was before Troydid he not propitiate you with many a burnt sacrifice? Why then shouldyou keep on being so angry with him?"

  • 陆伟 08-02

    {  THENCE we went on to the Aeoli island where lives Aeolus son ofHippotas, dear to the immortal gods. It is an island that floats (asit were) upon the sea, iron bound with a wall that girds it. Now,Aeolus has six daughters and six lusty sons, so he made the sons marrythe daughters, and they all live with their dear father and mother,feasting and enjoying every conceivable kind of luxury. All day longthe atmosphere of the house is loaded with the savour of roastingmeats till it groans again, yard and all; but by night they sleep ontheir well-made bedsteads, each with his own wife between theblankets. These were the people among whom we had now come.

  • 张忠杰 08-01

      This made them all very angry, for they feared he might string thebow; Antinous therefore rebuked him fiercely saying, "Wretchedcreature, you have not so much as a grain of sense in your whole body;you ought to think yourself lucky in being allowed to dine unharmedamong your betters, without having any smaller portion served you thanwe others have had, and in being allowed to hear our conversation.No other beggar or stranger has been allowed to hear what we say amongourselves; the wine must have been doing you a mischief, as it doeswith all those drink immoderately. It was wine that inflamed theCentaur Eurytion when he was staying with Peirithous among theLapithae. When the wine had got into his head he went mad and didill deeds about the house of Peirithous; this angered the heroes whowere there assembled, so they rushed at him and cut off his ears andnostrils; then they dragged him through the doorway out of thehouse, so he went away crazed, and bore the burden of his crime,bereft of understanding. Henceforth, therefore, there was warbetween mankind and the centaurs, but he brought it upon himselfthrough his own drunkenness. In like manner I can tell you that itwill go hardly with you if you string the bow: you will find nomercy from any one here, for we shall at once ship you off to kingEchetus, who kills every one that comes near him: you will never getaway alive, so drink and keep quiet without getting into a quarrelwith men younger than yourself."}

  • 舒肤佳 08-01

      When the pair had thus laid their plans they parted, and the goddesswent straight to Lacedaemon to fetch Telemachus.

  • 中曾根康弘 08-01

      "Hush," answered Ulysses, "hold your peace and ask no questions, forthis is the manner of the gods. Get you to your bed, and leave me hereto talk with your mother and the maids. Your mother in her griefwill ask me all sorts of questions."

  • 安倍希望 07-31

       The rest approved his words, and thereon men servants poured waterover the hands of the guests, while pages filled the mixing-bowls withwine and water and handed it round after giving every man hisdrink-offering. Then, when they had made their offerings and had drunkeach as much as he desired, Ulysses craftily said:

  • 谭汉亮 07-29

    {  "He would not answer, but turned away to Erebus and to the otherghosts; nevertheless, I should have made him talk to me in spite ofhis being so angry, or I should have gone talking to him, only thatthere were still others among the dead whom I desired to see.

  • 洪金宝 07-29

      Thus did they converse. Meanwhile the suitors were hatching a plotto murder Telemachus: but a bird flew near them on their left hand- aneagle with a dove in its talons. On this Amphinomus said, "My friends,this plot of ours to murder Telemachus will not succeed; let us goto dinner instead."

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