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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:秦祥林 大小:L6NkT8H374542KB 下载:eu1pxfGR30616次
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日期:2020-08-06 01:53:33
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邹国童

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  OF HIMSELFE, AND HIS TRUE HONOUR
2.  Divers times I have had as ill seeming dreames, yea, and much moreto be feared, yet never any thing hurtfull to me, followed thereon;and therefore I have alwayes made the lesse account of them.
3.  Let me then tell ye, that Pope Boniface (with whom the fore-namedMesser Geri Spina was in great regard) having sent divers Gentlemen ofhis Court to Florence as Ambassadors, about very serious and importantbusinesse: they were lodged in the house of Messer Geri Spina, andhe employed (with them) in the saide Popes negotiation. It chanced,that as being the most convenient way for passage, every morningthey walked on foot by the Church of Saint Marie d'Ughi, whereCistio the Baker dwelt, and exercised the trade belonging to him.Now although Fortune had humbled him to so meane a condition, yet sheeadded a blessing of wealth to that contemptible quality, and (assmiling on him continually) no disasters at any time befell him, butstill he flourished in riches, lived like a jolly Citizen, with allthings fitting for honest entertainment about him, and plenty of thebest Wines (both White and Claret) as Florence, or any part thereaboutyeelded.
4.  Being each of them endued with gentle spirits, and having beguntheir studies together: they arose (by degrees) to the glorious heightof Philosophy, to their much admired fame and commendation. In thismanner they lived, to the no meane comfort of Chremes, hardlydistinguishing the one from the other for his Son, and thus theSchollers continued the space of three yeares. At the ending wherof(as it hapneth in al things else) Chremes died, whereat both the youngGentlemen conceived such hearty griefe, as if he had bin theircommon father; nor could the kinred of Chremes discerne, which ofthe two had most need of comfort, the losse touched them so equally.
5.  When Melisso and Giosefo had passed over the Bridge, where theyintended to part each from other; a sudden motion happened into theminde of Melisso, which caused him to demaund of an aged man (who satecraving almes of Passengers at the Bridge foot) how the Bridge wascalled: Sir, answered the old man, this is called, The Goose Bridge.Which words when Giosefo heard, hee called to minde the saying of KingSalomon, and therefore immediately saide to Melisso. Worthy friend,and partner in my travell, I dare now assure sure that the counsellgiven me by King Salomon, may fall out most effectall and true: ForI plainely perceive, that I knew not how to handle my selfe-will'dwife, untill the Muletter did instruct me. So, requesting still toenjoy the others Company, they journeyed on, till at the length theycame to Laiazzo, where Giosefo retained Melisso still with him, forsome repose after so long a journey, and entertained him with veryhonourable respect and courtesie.
6.  THE TENTH DAY, THE NINTH NOVELL

计划指导

1.  Our over-joyed Scholler, applauding his happy Starres, forfurthering him with faire a way to his revenge; immagining that it wasalready halfe executed, made the Image in due forme, and wrote anold Fable, insted of a Charme; both which he sent to the Lady, sosoone as he thought the time to be fitting: and this admonitionwithall, that the Moone being entering into the full, without anylonger delay, she might venter on the businesse the next nightfollowing; and remaine assured to repossesse her friend. Afterward forthe better pleasing of himselfe, he went secretly attended, onely byhis servant, to the house of a trusty frend of his, who dweltsomwhat neere to the Turret, there to expect the issue of thisLady-like enterprize. And Madam Helena accompanied with none butAncilla walked on to her dairy Farme, where the night ensuing,pretending to take her rest sooner then formerly she used to doe,she commanded Ancilla to bed, referring her selfe to her best liking.
2.  No sooner were these Princely assurances received, but a goodly shipwas prepared in the Port of Carthagena, well furnished with allthinges thereto belonging, for the sending his daughter to the King ofGranada, waiting for nothing else but best favouring windes. The youngPrincesse, who understood and saw all this great preparation; secretlysent a servant of hers to Palermo, giving him especiall charge, on herbehalfe, to salute the Prince Gerbino, and to tell him that (withinfew dayes) she must be transported to Granada. And now opportunitygave faire and free meanes, to let the world know, whether he were aman of that magnanimous spirit, or no, as generall opinion hadformerly conceived of him, and whether he affected her so firmely,as by many close messages he had assured her. He who had the charge ofthis embassie, effectually performed it, and then returned backe toThunis.
3.  In the City of Pistoya, there dwelt sometime a beautifullGentlewoman, being a Widdow, whom two of our Florentines (the onenamed Rinuccio Palermini, and the other Alessandro Chiarmontesi,having withdrawne themselves to Pistoya) desperately affected, the oneignorant of the others intention, but each carrying his caseclosely, as hoping to be possessed of her. This Gentlewoman, namedMadame Francesca de Lazzari, being often solicited by theirmessages, and troublesomely pestered with their importunities: at last(lesse advisedly then she intended) shee granted admittance to heareeither of them speake. Which she repenting, and coveting to be ridof them both, a matter not easie to be done: she wittily devised theonely meanes, namely, to move such a motion to them, as neitherwould willingly undertake, yet within the compasse of possibility; butthey failing in the performance, shee might have the more honestoccasion, to bee free from all further mollestation by them, and herpolitike intention was thus projected.
4.  Alessandro hearing his arrivall, and also the removall of the bords,although he was exceedingly affraid; yet he lay quietly stil, andstirred not, and Rinuccio beeing in the grave, tooke Alessandro by thefeete, haling him forth, and (mounting him uppon his backe) went onthus loden, towards the house of Madam Francesca. As he passed alongthe streets, unseene or unmet by any, Alessandro suffered manyshrewd rushings and punches, by turnings at the streets corners, andjolting against bulkes, poasts, and stalles, which Rinuccio couldnot avoyd, in regard the night was so wonderfully darke, as heecould not see which way he went.
5.  Needlesse were any fresh relation to you, what manner of peoplethose three men were, Calandrino, Bruno, and Buffalmaco, becausealready you have had sufficient understanding of them. Andtherefore, as an induction to my discourse, I must tell you, thatCalandrino had a small Country-house, in a Village some-what neereto Florence, which came to him by the marriage of his Wife. Amon otherCattle and Poultry, which he kept there in store, hee had a youngBoare readie fatted for Brawne, whereof yearly he used to kill one forhis owne provision; and alwaies in the month of December, he and hiswife resorted to their village house, to have a Brawne both killed andsalted.
6.  Buffalmaco and Bruno hearing this, made shew of verie muchmervailing thereat, and many times maintained what Calandrino hadsaid; being well neere ready to burst with laughter; considering,how confidently he stood upon it, that he had found the wonderfulstone, and lost it by his wives speaking onely to him. But when theysaw him rise in fury once more, with intent to beat her againe: thenthey stept betweene them; affirming, That the woman had no wayoffended in this case, but rather he himself: who knowing that womencause all things to lose their vertue, had not therefore expreslycommanded her, not to be seene in his presence all that day, untill hehad made full proofe of the stones vertue. And questionles, theconsideration of a matter so availeable and important, was quite takenfrom him, because such an especiall happinesse, should not belong tohim only; but (in part) to his friends, whom he had acquaintedtherewith, drew them to the plaine with him in companie, where theytooke as much paines in serch of the stone, as possibly he did, orcould; and yet (dishonestly) he would deceive them, and beare itaway covetously, for his owne private benefit.

推荐功能

1.  The Monke very readily answered, saying. My good Lord, I have notyet beene so long in the Order of Saint Benedict, as to learne all theparticularities thereto belonging. And beside Sir, you never shewedmee or any of my Brethren, in what manner we young Monkes ought to usewomen, as you have otherwise done for our custome of prayer andfasting. But seeing you have so lately therein instructed mee, andby your owne example how to doe it: I heere solemnely promise you,if you please to pardon me but this one error, I will never failetherein againe, but dayly follow what I have seene you doe.
2.  Madame Helena, to colour this misfortune of her owne: as also thegreat mishap of her woman: forged an artificiall and cunning tale,to give some formall apparance of hir being in the Tower, perswadingthe poore simple Country people, that in a straunge accident ofthunder and lightning, and by the illusions of wicked spirits, allthis adventure hapned to her. Then Physitians were sent for; who,not without much anguish and affliction to the Ladie (by reason of herfleshes flaying off, with the Medicines and Emplaysters applyed to thebody) was glad to suffer whatsoever- they did, beside falling into avery dangerous Feaver; out of which she was not recovered in a longwhile after, but continued in daily dispayre of her life; beside otheraccidents hapning in her time of Physicke, utterly unavoydable in suchextreamities: and hardly had Ancilla her legge cured.
3.  His soule earnestly thirsting, by all possible meanes to helpe anddefend him, and no other course could now be taken for safetie ofhis life, but by accusing himselfe, to excuse and cleare the otherof the crime: hee stept from off the judgement bench, and croudingthrough the throng to the Barre, called out to the Praetor in thismanner. Marcus Varro, recall thy sentence given on the condemned mansent away, because hee is truely guiltlesse and innocent: With onebloudie blow have I offended the Gods, by killing that wretched man,whom the Serjeants found this morning slaine, wherefore Noble Praetor,let no innocent mans bloud be shed for it, but onely mine that haveoffended.
4.  Reynard being thus embraced for Madam Agnesiaes Gossip, and thisproving the onely colourable meanes, for his safer permission ofspeech with her, to let her now understand by word of mouth, what longbefore she collected by his lookes and behaviour: it fell out no waybeneficiall to him, albeit Agnesia seemed not nice or scrupulous inhearing, yet she had a more precious care of her honor. It came topasse, within a while after (whether by seeing his labour vainlyspent, or some other urgent occasion moving him thereto, I know not)Reynard would needs enter into Religion, and whatsoever strictnesse orausteritie hee found to be in that kinde of life, yet he determined topersevere therein, whether it were for his good or ill. And althoughwithin a short space, after he was thus become a Religious Monke,hee seemed to forget the former love which he bare to his gossipAgnesia, and divers other enormous vanities beside: yet let me tellyou, successe of time tutord him in them again(!; and, without anyrespect to his poore ho habite, but rather in contempt thereof (asit were) he tooke an especiall delight, in wearing garments of muchricher esteeme, yet favoured by the same Monasticall profession,appearing (in all respects) like a Court-Minion or Favourite, of asprightly and Poeticall disposition, for composing Verses, Sonnets,and Canzons, singing them to sundry excellent instruments, and yet notgreatly curious of his company, so they were some of the best, andMadame Agnesia one, his former Gossip.
5.   DECEIVING OTHERS, DO WELL DESERVE TO BE DECEIVED THEMSELVES
6.  O Soveraigne Love by thee.

应用

1.  Madam, by such revelations as have beene shewne to me, I know fora certainety, that Theobaldo is not dead, but living, in health, andin good estate; if he had the fruition of your grace and favour.Take heede what you say Sir (quoth the Gentlewoman) for I saw himlye slain before my doore, his bodie having received many wounds,which I folded in mine armes, and washed his face with my brinishteares; whereby (perhaps) the scandall arose, that flew abroad to mydisgrace. Beleeve me Madam, replyed the Pilgrim, say what you will,I dare assure you that Theobaldo is living, and if you dare makepromise, concerning what hath bin formerly requested, and keepe itinviolably, I make no doubt, but you your selfe shall shortly see him.I promise it (quoth she) and binde my selfe thereto by a sacredoath, to keepe it faithfully: for never could any thing happen toyeeld me the like contentment, as to see my Father free from danger,and Theobaldo living.
2.  THE COVERED CRAFT OF CHURCH-MEN MAY BEE JUSTLY REPROVED, AND
3.  Within a short while after her departure, the Gentleman, of whomeshe made this counterfeit complaint, came thither, as was his usuallmanner, and having done his duty to the holy Father, they sate downetogether privately, falling out of one discourse into another. Atthe length, the Friar (in very loving and friendly sort) mildlyreproved him for such amorous glaunces, and other pursuites, which (ashe thought) he dayly used to the Gentlewoman, according to her ownespeeches. The Gentleman mervalled greatly thereat, as one that hadnever seene her, and very sildome passed by the way where sheedwelt, which made him the bolder in his answeres; wherein theConfessour interrupting him, saide. Never make such admiration atthe matter, neyther waste more words in deniall, because they cannotserve thy turne; I tell thee plainely, I heard these words even fromher owne selfe, in a very sorowfull and sad complaint. And though(perhaps) heereafter, thou canst very hardly refraine such follies;yet let me tell thee so much of her (and under the seale of absoluteassurance) that she is the onely woman of the world, who to myjudgement, doth abhorre all such base behaviour. In regard thereforeof thine owne honour, as also not to vex and prejudice so vertuous aGentlewoman, I pray thee refraine such idlenesse henceforward, andsuffer her to live in peace.
4、  These words being heard both by the Bishop and Marshall, they feltthemselves touched to the quicke, the one, as the Factor or Broker,for so dishonest a businesse, to the Brother of the Bishop; and theother, as receiving (in his owne person) the shame belonging to hisBrother. So, not so much as looking each on other, or speaking oneword together all the rest of that day, they rode away with blushingcheekes. Whereby we may collect, that the yong Lady, being soinjuriously provoked, did no more then well became her, to bitetheir basenesse neerely, that so abused her openly.
5、  Besides, I am verily perswaded, that variety of matter uttered sofreely, will be much more delightfull, then restraint to one kindeof purpose onely. Which being thus granted by me, whosoever shalsucceede me in the government, may (as being of more power andpreheminence) restraine all backe againe to the accustomed lawes.And having thus spoken, she dispensed with their any longerattendance, untill it should be Supper time.

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  • 陈某梅 08-05

      In the Spring season, etc.

  • 矫枉 08-05

      An honest man, named Fresco da Celatico, had a good fulsom wenchto his Neece, who for her folly and squemishnes, was generallycalled Cesta, or nice Francesca. And althogh she had staturesufficient, yet none of the handsomest, and a good hard favourdcountenance, nothing nere such Angelical beauties as we have seen; yetshe was endued with such height of minde, and so proud an opinion ofher selfe, that it appeared as a custome bred in hir, or rather a giftbestowed on hir by nature (thogh none of the best) to blame anddespise both men and women, yea whosoever she lookt on; without anyconsideration of her self, she being as unsightly, ill shaped, andugly faced, as a worse was very hardly to be found.

  • 夏训诚 08-05

       There dwelt sometime in Arezzo (which is a faire Village of Tuscany)a rich man, named Tofano, who enjoyed in marriage a young beautifullwoman, called Cheta: of whom (without any occasion given, or reasonknowne to himselfe) he became exceeding- jealous. Which his wifeperceyving, she grew much offended thereat, and tooke it in greatscorne, that she should be servile to so vile and slavish a condition.Oftentimes, she demanded of him, from whence this jealousie in himreceived originall, he having never seene or heard of any; he couldmake her no other answer, but who his owne bad humour suggested, anddrove him every day (almost) to deaths doore, by feare of that whichno way needed. But, whether as a just scourge for this his grossefolly, or a secret decree, ordained to him by Fortune and the Fates, Iam not able to distinguish: It came so to passe, that a youngGallant made meanes to enjoy her favour, and she was so discreetlywise in judging of his worthinesse; that affection passed so farremutually betweene them, as nothing wanted, but effects to answerewords, suited with time and place convenient, for which order wastaken as best they might, yet to stand free from all suspition.

  • 张文山 08-05

      Alas! why live I then?

  • 柏斯 08-04

    {  Magdalena, having acquainted her Husband with her vertuousintention, for preserving her Sisters life, and disappointing the Dukein his wicked desire; was as contrary to her true meaning in thiscase, as Ninetta had formerly beene adverse to Restagnone, onely beingover-ruled likewise by jealousie, and perswaded in his rash opinion,that the Duke had already dishonoured Magdalena, otherwise, he wouldnot have delivered Ninetta out of prison. Mad fury gave further fireto this unmanly perswasion, and nothing will now quench this but thelife of poore Magdalena, suddenly sacrificed in the rescue of herSister, such a divell is anger, when the understandings bright eyeis thereby abused. No credit might bee given to her womanlyprotestations, or any thing seeme to alter his bloody purpose; but,having slaine Magdalena with his Poniard (notwithstanding her tearesand humble entreaties) he ranne in haste to Ninettaes Chamber, she notdreaming on any such desperate accident, and to her he used thesedissembling speeches.

  • 詹佳 08-03

      On the other side, we are to consider also, that hee hath bin sobadde a man, as he will not now make any confession thereof, neitherreceive the blessed Sacrament of the Church, and dying so withoutconfession; there is no Church that will accept his body, but itmust be buried in prophane ground, like to a Dogge. And yet if heewould confesse himselfe, his sinnes are so many and monstrous, asthe like case also may happen, because there is not any Priest orReligious person, that can or will absolve him. And being notabsolved, he must be cast into some ditch or pit, and then thepeople of the Towne, as well in regard of the account we carryheere, (which to them appeareth so little pleasing, as we are dailypursued with their worst words) as also coveting our spoile andoverthrow, upon this accident will cry out and mutiny against us;Behold these Lombard dogs, which are not to be received into theChurch, why should we suffer them to live heere among us? In furiousmadnesse will they come upon us, and our house, where (peradventure)not contended with robbing us of our goods, our lives will remainein their mercy and danger; so that, in what sort soever it happen,this mans dying here, must needs be banefull to us.}

  • 马登峰 08-03

      Madame Usimbalda, Lady Abbesse of a Monastery of Nuns inLombardie, arising hastily in the night time without a Candle, to takeone of her Daughter Nunnes in bed with a yong Gentleman, whereof shewas enviously accused, by certaine of her other Sisters: The Abbesseher selfe (being at the same time in bed with a Priest) imagining tohave put on her head her plaited vayle, put on the Priests breeches.Which when the poore Nunne perceyved; by causing the Abbesse to seeher owne error, she got her selfe to be absolved, and had the freerliberty afterward, to be more familiar with her frend, then formerlyshe had bin.

  • 罗国军 08-03

      THE NINTH DAY, THE FIFT NOVELL

  • 衡宇 08-02

       When Mithridanes had a while pondered on her speeches, hee waxedmuch discontented, as taking the words of the olde woman, to extollthe renowne of Nathan, and darken or ecclipse his glorie, whereupon hesaid to himselfe. Wretched man as I am, when shall I attaine to theheight of liberality, and performe such wonders, as Nathan doth? Inseeking to surmount him, I cannot come neere him in the verymeanest. Undoubtedly, I spend all my endeavour but in vaine, exceptI rid the world of him, which (seeing his age will not make an endof him) I must needs do with my own hands. In which furious and bloodydetermination (without revealing his intent to any one) he mountedon horse-backe, with few attendants in his company, and after threedayes journey, arrived where Nathan dwelt. He gave order to his men,to make no shew of beeing his servants, or any way to acknowledge him:but to provide them selves of convenient lodgings, untill they heardother tydings from him.

  • 林书喜 07-31

    {  True it is, that if it be spoken by way of answer, and theanswerer biteth doggedly, because himselfe was bitten in the samemanner before: he is the lesse to bee blamed, because hee makethpayment but with coine of the same stampe. In which respect, anespeciall care is to bee had, how, when, with whom, and where wejest or gibe, whereof very many proove too unmindfull, as appeared(not long since) by a Prelate of ours, who met with a byting, no lessesharpe and bitter, then had first come from himselfe before, asverie briefely I intend to tell you how.

  • 李秋鹏 07-31

      The Tale reported by Dioneus, at the first hearing of the Ladies,began to rellish of some immodestie, as the bashfull blood mounting upinto their faces, delivered by apparant testimonie. And beholdingone another with scarse-pleasing lookes, during all the time it was indiscoursing, no sooner had he concluded: but with a few milde andgentle speeches, they gave him a modest reprehension, and meaning tolet him know that such tales ought not to be tolde among women.Afterward, the Queene commaunded Madam Fiammetta, (sitting on abanke of flowers before her) to take her turne as next in order; andshe, smiling with such a virgin blush, as very beautifully became her,began in this manner.

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