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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:宋大勇 大小:NSpcJkzp59269KB 下载:D1uhNmZa56774次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:PN5HwXRJ41233条
日期:2020-08-11 10:18:30
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莉雅——

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  THE THIRD DAY, THE FIRST NOVELL
2.  After some other questions, how this intention of theirs might beesafely brought to full effect: the sprightly Nun that had wit at will,thus answered. You see Sister (quoth she) it is now the houre ofmidday, when all the rest of our sisterhood are quiet in theirChambers, because we are then allowed to sleep, for our earlier risingto morning Mattins. Here are none in the Garden now but our selves,and while I awake him, bee you the watch, and afterward follow meein my fortune, for I will valiantly leade you the way. Massettoimmitating a Dogges sleepe, heard all this conspiracie intendedagainst him, and longed as earnestly till shee came to awake him.Which being done, he seeming very simple and sottish, and she chearinghim with flattering behaviour: into the close Arbour they went,which the Sunnes bright eye could not pierce into, and there I leaveit to the Nunnes owne approbation, whether Massetto was a manrationall, or no. Ill deeds require longer time to contrive, then act;and both the Nuns having bene with Massetto at this new forme ofconfession, were enjoyned (by him) such an easie and silent penance,as brought them the oftner to shrift, and made him to proove a veryperfect Confessour.
3.  The Lady hearing these words (not without much paine and difficulty)restrayned her teares, quite contrary to the naturall inclination ofwomen, and thus answered. Great Marquesse, I never was so empty ofdiscretion, but did alwayes acknowledge, that my base and humblecondition, could not in any manner sute with your high blood andNobility, and my being with you, I ever acknowledged, to proceedfrom heaven and you, not any merit of mine, but onely as a favour lentme, which you being now pleased to recall backe againe, I ought tobe pleased (and so am) that it bee restored. Here is the Ring,wherewith you Espoused me; here (in all humility) I deliver it to you.You command me, to carry home the marriage Dowry which I broughtwith me: there is no need of a Treasurer to repay it me, neither anynew purse to carry it in, much lesse any Sumpter to be laden withit. For (Noble Lord) it was never out of my memory, that you tookeme starke naked, and if it shall seeme sightly to you, that thisbody which hath borne two children, and begotten by you, must againebe seene naked; willingly must I depart hence naked. But I humblybeg of your Excellency, in recompence of my Virginity, which I broughtyou blamelesse, so much as in thought: that I may have but one of mywedding Smocks, onely to conceale the shame of nakednesse, and thenI depart rich enough.
4.  IN JUST SCORNE OF SUCH UNSIGHTLY AND ILL-PLEASING SURLY SLUTS, WHO
5.  Signior Andrea, you are the most welcome friend to me in theworld; sealing this salutation with infinite sweet kisses andembraces: whereat (in wonderfull amazement) he being strangelytransported, replied; Madame, you honour me beyond all compasse ofmerit. Then, taking him by the hand, shee guided him thorough a goodlyHall, into her owne Chamber, which was delicately embalmed with Roses,Orenge flowers, and all other pleasing smelles, and a costly bed inthe middest, curtained round about, verie artificiall Picturesbeautifying the walles, with many other embellishments, such asthose Countries are liberally stored withall. He being meerely anovice in these kinds of wanton carriages of the World, and freefrom any base or degenerate conceite; firmely perswaded himselfe, that(questionlesse) she was a Lady of no meane esteeme, and he more thenhappy, to be thus respected and honored by her. They both being seatedon a curious Chest at the beds feete, teares cunningly trickling downeher Cheekes, and sighes intermedled with inward sobbings, breathedfoorth in sad, but verie seemely manner, thus shee beganne.
6.  Now, it is not to be denyed, that whosoever hath need of helpe,and is to bee governed: meerely reason commandeth, that they shouldbee subject and obedient to their governour. Who then should we havefor our helps and governours, if not men? Wherfore, we should beintirely subject to them, in giving them due honour and reverence, andsuch a one as shall depart from this rule: she (in mine opinion) isnot onely worthy of grievous reprehension, but also severechastisement beside. And to this exact consideration (over and abovedivers other important reasons) I am the rather induced, by theNovel which Madame Pampinea so lately reported, concerning the frowardand wilfull wife of Talano, who had a heavier punishment inflictedon her, then her Husband could devise to doe. And therefore it is myperemptory sentence, that all such women as will not be gracious,benigne and pleasing: doe justly deserve (as I have already said)rude, rough and harsh handling, as both nature, custome and lawes havecommanded.

计划指导

1.  Octavius Caesar, to whom tydings was brought of this rareaccident, commanding them al three to be brought before him; wouldneeds understand the whole History, in every particular as all hadhappened, which was substantially related to him. Whereupon,Octavius pleased them all three: the two noble friendes, becausethey were innocent, and the third, for openly revealing the verytruth.
2.  WHEREBY WEE MAY LEARNE, THAT SUCH THINGS AS SOMETIME SEEME
3.  Gisippus remaining still at Athens, in small regard of eyther theirsor his owne friends: not long after by meanes of sundry troublesomeCitizens; and partialities happening among the common people, wasbanished from Athens, and hee, as also all his familie, condemned toperpetuall exile: during which tempestuous time, Gisippus was becomenot onely wretchedly poore, but wandred abroad as a common begger;in which miserable condition he travelled to Rome, to try if Tituswould take any acknowledgement of him. Understanding that he wasliving, and one most respected among the Romanes, as being a greatCommander and a Senator: he enquired for the place where hee dwelt,and going to be neere about his house, stayed there so long, tillTitus came home, yet not daring to manifest himselfe, or speake a wordto him, in regard of his poore and miserable estate, but strove tohave him see him, to the end, that hee might acknowledge and callhim by his name; notwithstanding, Titus passed by him without eitherspeech, or looking on him: Which when Gisippus perceived, and makingfull account, that (at the least) he would remember him, in regardof former courtesies, done to him: confounded with griefe anddesperate thoughtes, hee departed thence, never meaning to see him anymore.
4.  FALL, THROUGH A COVETOUS DESIRE TO ENRICH HIMSELFE
5.  The Physicion being gone, and they repairing to their sicke Sonne,the Mother began with him in this manner. Sonne, I was alwayesperswaded, that thou wouldest not conceale any secret from me, orthe least part of thy desires; especially, when without enjoying them,thou must remaine in the danger of death. Full well art thouassured, or in reason oughtest to be, that there is not any thingfor thy contentment, be it of what quality soever, but it shouldhave beene provided for thee, and in as ample manner as for mineowne selfe. But though thou hast wandred so farre from duty, andhazarded both thy life and ours, it commeth so to passe, that Heavenhath beene more mercifull to thee, then thou wouldest be to thy selfe,or us. And to prevent thy dying of this disease, a dreame this nighthath acquainted me with the principall occasion of thy sickenesse,to wit extraordinary affection to a young Maiden, in some such placeas thou hast seene her. I tell thee Sonne, it is a matter of nodisgrace to love, and why shouldst thou shame to manifest as much,it being so apt and convenient for thy youth? For if I were perswaded,that thou couldst not love, I should make the lesse esteeme of thee.Therefore deare Sonne, be not dismayed, but freely discover thineaffections. Expell those disastrous drouping thoughts, that haveindangered thy life by this long lingering sicknesse. And let thysoule be faithfully assured, that thou canst not require any thingto be done, remaining within the compasse of my power, but I willperforme it; for I love thee as dearely as mine owne life. Settherefore aside this nice conceit of shame and feare, revealing thetruth boldly to me, if I may stead thee in thy love; resolving thyselfe unfaignedly, that if my care stretch not to compasse thycontent, account me for the most cruell Mother living, and utterlyunworthy of such a Sonne.
6.  Moreover, although thou condemnest my beauty greatly, esteeming itas a trifle, momentary, and of slender continuance; yet, such as it is(being comparable with any other womans whatsoever) I am not soignorant, that were there no other reason to induce liking thereof:yet men in the vigour of their youth (as I am sure you think yourselfe not aged) do hold it for an especiall delight, ordained bynature for them to admire and honour. And notwithstanding all thycruelty extended to mee, yet I cannot be perswaded, that thou art soflinty or Ironhearted, as to desire my miserable death, by castingmy selfe headlong downe (like a desperate madde woman) before thyface, so to destroy that beuty, which (if thy Letters lyed not) wasonce so highly pleasing in thine eyes. Take pitty then on mee forcharities sake, because the Sunne beginneth to heate extreamely: andas over-much colde (that unhappy night) was mine offence, so let notover-violent warmth be now my utter ruine and death.

推荐功能

1.  Amongst these Merchants thus communing together, there was a youngproper man, named Ambroginolo of Placentia, who began to laugh atthe last prayses which Bernardo had used of his Wife, and seeming tomake a mockerie thereof, demaunded, if the Emperour had given him thispriviledge, above all other married men? Bernardo being somewhatoffended, answered: No Emperour hath done it, but the especiallblessing of heaven, exceeding all the Emperours on the earth in grace,and thereby have received this favour; whereto Ambroginolo presentlythus replyed. Bernardo, without all question to the contrary, Ibeleeve that what thou hast said, is true; but (for ought I canperceive) thou hast slender judgement in the Nature of things:because, if thou diddst observe them well, thou couldst not be of sogrosse understanding. For, by comprehending matters in their truekinde and nature, thou wouldst speake of them more correctly then thoudoest. And to the end, thou mayest not imagine, that we who havespoken of our Wives, doe thinke any otherwise of them, then as welland honestly as thou canst of thine, nor that any thing else didurge these speeches of them, or falling into this kinde ofdiscourse, but onely by a naturall instinct and admonition, I wilproceede familiarly, a little further with thee, uppon the matteralreadie propounded. I have evermore understoode, that man was themost noble creature, formed by God to live in this World, and woman inthe next degree to him: but man, as generally is beleeved, and as isdiscerned by apparant effects is the most perfect of both. Having thenthe most perfection in him, without all doubt, he must be so muchthe more firme and constant. So in like manner, it hath beene, andis universally graunted, that Woman is more various and mutable, maybe approved by and the reason thereof may be approved by many naturallcircumstances, which were needlesse now to make any mention of. If aman then be possessed of the greater stability, and yet cannotcontaine himselfe from condiscending, I say not to one thatentreates him, but to desire any other that please him; and beside, tocovet the enjoying of his owne pleasing contentment (a thing notchancing to him once in a moneth, but infinite times in a dayesspace). What can you then conceive of a fraile Woman, subject (bynature) to entreaties, flatteries, giftes, perswasions, and a thousandother inticing meanes, which a man (that is affected to her) canuse? Doest thou thinke then that she hath any power to containe?Assuredly, though thou shouldest rest so resolved, yet cannot I beof the same opinion. For I am sure thou beleevest, and must needesconfesse it, that thy wife is a Woman, made of flesh and blood, asother women are: if it be so, she cannot bee without the same desires,and the weaknesse or strength as other women have, to resistnaturall appetites as her owne are. In regard whereof, it is meerelyimpossible (although she be most honest) but she must needs doe thatwhich other Women doe: for there is nothing else possible, either tobe denied or affirmed to the contrary, as thou most unadvisedly hastdone.
2.  Ricciardo (replied Messer Lizio) the love I beare thee, and thehonest confidence I do repose in thee, step up (in some measure) toplead thine excuse, especially in the regard of my Daughter, whom Iblame thee not for loving, but for this unlawfull way of presumingto her. Neverthelesse, perceiving how the case now standeth, andconsidering withall, that youth and affection were the ground of thineoffence: to free thee from death, and my selfe from dishonour,before thou departest hence, thou shalt espouse my Daughter Catharina,to make her thy lawfull wife in marriage, and wipe off all scandall tomy House and me. All this while was poore Catharina on her kneeslikewise to her Mother, who (notwithstanding this her boldadventure) made earnest suite to her Husband to remit all, becauseRicciardo right gladly condiscended, as it being the maine issue ofhis hope and desire; to accept his Catharina in marriage, wheretoshe was as willing as he. Messer Lizio presently called for theConfessour of his House, and borrowing one of his Wives Rings,before they went out of the Gallery; Ricciardo and Catharina wereespoused together, to their no little joy and contentment.
3.  The Abbot (cloathed as he was) laide him in a hollow vault under aTombe, such as there are used instead of Graves; his Wife returninghome againe to her House, with a young Sonne which shee had by herHusband, protesting to keepe still within her House, and never more tobe seene in any company, but onely to attend her young Sonne, and bevery carefull of such wealth as her Husband had left unto her.From the City of Bologna, that very instant day, a well staide andgoverned Monke there arrived, who was a neere kinsman to the Abbot,and one whom he might securely trust. In the dead time of the night,the Abbot and this Monke arose, and taking Ferando out of the vault,carried him into a darke dungeon or prison, which he termed by thename of Purgatory, and where hee used to discipline his Monkes, whenthey had committed any notorious offence, deserving to be punishedin Purgatory. There they tooke off all his usuall wearing garments,and cloathed him in the habite of a Monke, even as if he had beene oneof the house; and laying him m a bundle of straw, so left him untillhis senses should be restored againe. On the day following, late inthe evening, the Abbot, accompanied with his trusty Monke, (by wayof visitation) went to see and comfort the supposed widow, finding herattired in blacke, very sad and pensive, which by his wontedperswasions, indifferently he appeased; challenging the benefit ofpromise. Shee being thus alone, not hindered by her Husbandsjealousie, and espying another goodly gold Ring on his finger, howfrailety and folly over-ruled her, I know not, shee was a weake woman,he a divelish deluding man; and the strongest holdes by over longbattery and besieging, must needs yeeld at the last, as I feare sheedid: for very often afterward, the Abbot used in this manner tovisit her, and the simple ignorant Country people, carrying no suchill opinion of the holy Abbot, and having- seene Ferando lying fordead in the vault, and also in the habite of a Monke; were verilyperswaded, that when they saw the Abbot passe by to and fro, butmost commonly in the night season, it was the ghost of Ferando, whowalked in this manner after his death, as a just pennance for hisjealousie.
4.  Ferando breathing foorth a vehement sigh, desired to know what hewas, being thus appointed to punish him in Purgatory? I am (quoththe Monke) a dead man, as thou art, borne in Sardignia, where I serveda very jealous Master; and because: I soothed him in his jealousie,I had this pennance imposed on me, to serve thee here in Purgatorywith meate and drinke, and (twice every day) to discipline thy body,untill the Fates have otherwise determined both for thee and me.Why? saide Ferando, are any other persons here, beside you and I? Manythousands, replyed the Monke, whom thou canst neither heare nor see,no more then they are able to doe the like by us. But how farre, saideFerando, is Purgatory distant from our native Countries? About somefifty thousand leagues, answered the Monke; but yet passable in amoment, whensoever the offended Fates are pleased: and many Masses aredally saide for thy soule, at the earnest entreaty of thy Wife, inhope of thy conversion; and becomming a new man, hating to bejealous any more hereafter.
5.   KEPT IN ALL PLACES
6.  Must still conceale,

应用

1.  Having thus discoursed with himselfe, he would needs understand ofwhence, and what he was, and finding him to be Primasso, come onely tosee the magnificence which he had reported of him, knowing also (bythe generall fame noysed every where of him) that he was reputed to bea learned, honest, and ingenious man: he grew greatly ashamed of hisowne folly, and being desirous to make him an amends, strove manywaies how to do him honor. When dinner was ended, the Abbot bestowedhonorable garments on him, such as beseemed his degree and merit,and putting good store of money in his purse, as also giving him agood horse to ride on, left it at his owne free election, whether hewould stay there still with him, or depart at his pleasure.Wherewith Primasso being highly contented, yeelding him theheartiest thankes he could devise to do, returned to Paris onhorse-backe, albeit he came poorely thether on foot.
2.  And death (as yet) being deafe to all his earnest imprecations,delayed him on in lingering afflictions: and continuing still insuch an extreame condition, he was advised by some of his bestfriends, utterly to abstaine from this fond pursuit, because his hopeswere meerely in vaine, and Madam Catulla prized nothing moreprecious to her in the World, then unstayned loyaltie to herHusband: and yet shee lived in such extreame jealousie of him, asfearing least some bird flying in the ayre should snatch him from her.
3.  For tell I may not, what I feele, and why.
4、  When Ferandoes senses were recovered againe, and he found himselfeto be in such a darkesome place; not knowing where he was, hebeganne to crie and make a noyse. When presently the Monke ofBologna (according as the Abbot had tutored him) stept into thedungeon, carrying a little waxe candle in the one hand, and a smartingwhip in the other, going to Ferando, he stript off his cloathes, andbegan to lash him very soundly. Ferando roaring and crying, couldsay nothing else, but where am I? The Monke (with a dreadfull voyce)replyed: Thou art in Purgatory. How? saide Ferando; what? Am I dead?Thou art dead (quoth the Monke) and began to lash him lustilyagaine. Poore Ferando, crying out for his Wife and little Sonne,demanded a number of idle questions, whereto the Monke still fittedhim with as fantasticke answers. Within a while after, he set bothfoode and wine before him, which when Ferando saw, he saide; How isthis? Doe dead men eate and drinke? Yes, replyed the Monke, and thisfoode which here thou seest, thy Wife brought hither to the Churchthis morning, to have Masses devoutly sung for thy soule, and as toother, so must it be set before thee, for such is the command of thePatrone of this place.
5、  She was a Lady of extraordinary beauty, tall stature, verysumptuously attired, and having two sweet Sonnes (resembling Angels)she came with them waiting before her, and graciously saluted herguests.

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网友评论(98SQvFjO24510))

  • 金宝 08-10

      Having in this manner renewed his wonted amity with her, and withwords farre enough off from all further meaning: Salabetto beganagaine to frequent her company, she expressing all former familiarity,shewing her selfe as lavishly bountifull to him, in all respects asbefore she had done, nay, many times in more magnificent manner.

  • 徐东 08-10

      When the Marquesse perceyved, that Grizelda beleeved verily, thisyong daughter of hers should be his wife, and answered him in sohonest and modest manner: he commanded her to sit downe by him, andsaide. Grizelda, it is now more then fitte time, that thou shouldsttaste the fruite of thy long admired patience, and that they whohave thought me cruell, harsh and uncivill natured, should at lengthobserve, that I have done nothing basely, or unadvisedly. For this wasa worke premeditated before, for enstructing thee, what it is to bea married wife, and to let them know (whosoever they be) how to takeand keepe a wife. Which hath begotten (to me) perpetuall joy andhappinesse, so long as I have a day to live with thee: a matterwhereof I stoode before greatly in feare, and which (in marriage Ithought) would never happen to me.

  • 李晓霞 08-10

       Then I am she can vaunt (if I were wise)

  • 苏喜乐 08-10

      To dance and sing;

  • 周洪波 08-09

    {  According as his intention aymed, so he longed to put it inexecution, and having imparted his mind to an honest loyall friend,named Adriano, who was acquainted with the course of his love:hyring two horses, and having Portmantues behind them, filled withmatters of no moment, they departed from Florence, as if they had somegreat journey to ride. Having spent the day time where themselves bestpleased, darke night being entred, they arrived on the plaine ofMugnone, where, as if they were come from the parts of Romanio, theyrode directly to this poore Inne, and knocking at the doore, thehonest Hoste (being familiar and friendly to all commers) opened thedoore, when Panuccio spake in this manner to him. Good man, we mustrequest one nights lodging with you, for we thought to have reached sofarre as Florence, but dark night preventing us, you see at what alate houre wee are come hither. Signior Panuccio, answered thehoste, it is not unknowne to you, how unfiting my poore house is,for entertaining such guests as you are: Neverthelesse, seeing you areovertaken by so unseasonable an houre, and no other place is neere foryour receite; I will gladly lodge you so well as I can.

  • 小林说出了 08-08

      THE THIRD DAY, THE FIRST NOVELL}

  • 韩梅梅 08-08

      WHEREIN IS DESCRIBED THE FRAILETY OF SOME WOMEN, AND FOLLY OF

  • 徐芳 08-08

      WHEREIN IS SIGNIFIED, THE PROVIDENCE OF A WISE MAN, WHEN

  • 郭传 08-07

       REPREHENDING THE LEWD LIVES OF DISSEMBLING HYPOCRITES; AND

  • 付志方 08-05

    {  Say shee the word, in full felicity

  • 傅涛 08-05

      THE INDUCTION TO THE EIGHT DAY

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