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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:郭国军 大小:ryVdGEPg64088KB 下载:i8YWrCsp81063次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:bKzuCL3C45670条
日期:2020-08-09 17:05:02
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黄崇胜

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Then Telemachus said, "Eurymachus, and you other suitors, I shallsay no more, and entreat you no further, for the gods and the peopleof Ithaca now know my story. Give me, then, a ship and a crew oftwenty men to take me hither and thither, and I will go to Spartaand to Pylos in quest of my father who has so long been missing.Some one may tell me something, or (and people often hear things inthis way) some heaven-sent message may direct me. If I can hear of himas alive and on his way home I will put up with the waste yousuitors will make for yet another twelve months. If on the otherhand I hear of his death, I will return at once, celebrate his funeralrites with all due pomp, build a barrow to his memory, and make mymother marry again."
2.  "Goddess," answered Ulysses, "all that you have said is true, butI am in some doubt as to how I shall be able to kill these wickedsuitors single handed, seeing what a number of them there alwaysare. And there is this further difficulty, which is still moreconsiderable. Supposing that with Jove's and your assistance I succeedin killing them, I must ask you to consider where I am to escape tofrom their avengers when it is all over."
3.  As she spoke she shed sleep over his eyes, and then went back toOlympus.
4.  As she spoke she looked towards Penelope, as though wanting totell her that her dear husband was in the house, but Penelope wasunable to look in that direction and observe what was going on, forMinerva had diverted her attention; so Ulysses caught Euryclea bythe throat with his right hand and with his left drew her close tohim, and said, "Nurse, do you wish to be the ruin of me, you whonursed me at your own breast, now that after twenty years of wanderingI am at last come to my own home again? Since it has been borne inupon you by heaven to recognize me, hold your tongue, and do not say aword about it any one else in the house, for if you do I tell you- andit shall surely be- that if heaven grants me to take the lives ofthese suitors, I will not spare you, though you are my own nurse, whenI am killing the other women."
5.  The suitors bit their lips, and marvelled at the boldness of hisspeech; then Antinous said, "We do not like such language but wewill put up with it, for Telemachus is threatening us in good earnest.If Jove had let us we should have put a stop to his brave talk erenow."
6.  Then Ulysses said, "Sir, I do not want to stay here; a beggar canalways do better in town than country, for any one who likes cangive him something. I am too old to care about remaining here at thebeck and call of a master. Therefore let this man do as you havejust told him, and take me to the town as soon as I have had a warm bythe fire, and the day has got a little heat in it. My clothes arewretchedly thin, and this frosty morning I shall be perished withcold, for you say the city is some way off."

计划指导

1.  "Vixen," replied Ulysses, scowling at her, "I will go and tellTelemachus what you have been saying, and he will have you torn limbfrom limb."
2.  Then Ulysses answered, "Madam wife of Ulysses, you need not deferyour tournament, for Ulysses will return ere ever they can stringthe bow, handle it how they will, and send their arrows through theiron."
3.  As he said this Euryclea left the cloister to fetch some more water,for the first had been all spilt; and when she had washed him andanointed him with oil, Ulysses drew his seat nearer to the fire towarm himself, and hid the scar under his rags. Then Penelope begantalking to him and said:
4.  "I understand and heed you," replied Eumaeus; "you need instructme no further, only I am going that way say whether I had not betterlet poor Laertes know that you are returned. He used to superintendthe work on his farm in spite of his bitter sorrow about Ulysses,and he would eat and drink at will along with his servants; but theytell me that from the day on which you set out for Pylos he hasneither eaten nor drunk as he ought to do, nor does he look afterhis farm, but sits weeping and wasting the flesh from off his bones."
5.  Presently the sun set and it became dark, whereon the pair retiredinto the inner part of the cave and went to bed.
6.  "I also saw fair Epicaste mother of king OEdipodes whose awful lotit was to marry her own son without suspecting it. He married herafter having killed his father, but the gods proclaimed the wholestory to the world; whereon he remained king of Thebes, in great grieffor the spite the gods had borne him; but Epicaste went to the houseof the mighty jailor Hades, having hanged herself for grief, and theavenging spirits haunted him as for an outraged mother- to his ruingbitterly thereafter.

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1.  "In the end I deemed it would be the best plan to do as follows. TheCyclops had a great club which was lying near one of the sheep pens;it was of green olive wood, and he had cut it intending to use itfor a staff as soon as it should be dry. It was so huge that wecould only compare it to the mast of a twenty-oared merchant vessel oflarge burden, and able to venture out into open sea. I went up to thisclub and cut off about six feet of it; I then gave this piece to themen and told them to fine it evenly off at one end, which theyproceeded to do, and lastly I brought it to a point myself, charringthe end in the fire to make it harder. When I had done this I hid itunder dung, which was lying about all over the cave, and told themen to cast lots which of them should venture along with myself tolift it and bore it into the monster's eye while he was asleep. Thelot fell upon the very four whom I should have chosen, and I myselfmade five. In the evening the wretch came back from shepherding, anddrove his flocks into the cave- this time driving them all inside, andnot leaving any in the yards; I suppose some fancy must have takenhim, or a god must have prompted him to do so. As soon as he had putthe stone back to its place against the door, he sat down, milkedhis ewes and his goats all quite rightly, and then let each have herown young one; when he had got through with all this work, hegripped up two more of my men, and made his supper off them. So I wentup to him with an ivy-wood bowl of black wine in my hands:
2.  "When Proserpine had dismissed the female ghosts in alldirections, the ghost of Agamemnon son of Atreus came sadly up tome,surrounded by those who had perished with him in the house ofAegisthus. As soon as he had tasted the blood he knew me, andweeping bitterly stretched out his arms towards me to embrace me;but he had no strength nor substance any more, and I too wept andpitied him as I beheld him. 'How did you come by your death,' saidI, 'King Agamemnon? Did Neptune raise his winds and waves againstyou when you were at sea, or did your enemies make an end of you onthe mainland when you were cattle-lifting or sheep-stealing, orwhile they were fighting in defence of their wives and city?'
3.  Telemachus and the son of Nestor stayed their horses at the gate,whereon Eteoneus servant to Menelaus came out, and as soon as he sawthem ran hurrying back into the house to tell his Master. He wentclose up to him and said, "Menelaus, there are some strangers comehere, two men, who look like sons of Jove. What are we to do? Shall wetake their horses out, or tell them to find friends elsewhere asthey best can?"
4.  Thus did he pray, and Minerva heard his prayer, but she would notshow herself to him openly, for she was afraid of her uncle Neptune,who was still furious in his endeavors to prevent Ulysses from gettinghome.
5.   "On this the men would have come with me at once, but Eurylochustried to hold them back and said, 'Alas, poor wretches that we are,what will become of us? Rush not on your ruin by going to the house ofCirce, who will turn us all into pigs or wolves or lions, and we shallhave to keep guard over her house. Remember how the Cyclops treated uswhen our comrades went inside his cave, and Ulysses with them. Itwas all through his sheer folly that those men lost their lives.'
6.  "After him I saw huge Orion in a meadow full of asphodel driving theghosts of the wild beasts that he had killed upon the mountains, andhe had a great bronze club in his hand, unbreakable for ever and ever.

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1.  Then the god stayed his stream and stilled the waves, making allcalm before him, and bringing him safely into the mouth of theriver. Here at last Ulysses' knees and strong hands failed him, forthe sea had completely broken him. His body was all swollen, and hismouth and nostrils ran down like a river with sea-water, so that hecould neither breathe nor speak, and lay swooning from sheerexhaustion; presently, when he had got his breath and came tohimself again, he took off the scarf that Ino had given him andthrew it back into the salt stream of the river, whereon Inoreceived it into her hands from the wave that bore it towards her.Then he left the river, laid himself down among the rushes, and kissedthe bounteous earth.
2.  "Take my advice then, and do not go travelling about for long so farfrom home, nor leave your property with such dangerous people inyour house; they will eat up everything you have among them, and youwill have been on a fool's errand. Still, I should advise you by allmeans to go and visit Menelaus, who has lately come off a voyage amongsuch distant peoples as no man could ever hope to get back from,when the winds had once carried him so far out of his reckoning;even birds cannot fly the distance in a twelvemonth, so vast andterrible are the seas that they must cross. Go to him, therefore, bysea, and take your own men with you; or if you would rather travelby land you can have a chariot, you can have horses, and here are mysons who can escort you to Lacedaemon where Menelaus lives. Beg of himto speak the truth, and he will tell you no lies, for he is anexcellent person."
3.  ULYSSES now left the haven, and took the rough track up throughthe wooded country and over the crest of the mountain till hereached the place where Minerva had said that he would find theswineherd, who was the most thrifty servant he had. He found himsitting in front of his hut, which was by the yards that he hadbuilt on a site which could be seen from far. He had made themspacious and fair to see, with a free ran for the pigs all round them;he had built them during his master's absence, of stones which hehad gathered out of the ground, without saying anything to Penelope orLaertes, and he had fenced them on top with thorn bushes. Outsidethe yard he had run a strong fence of oaken posts, split, and setpretty close together, while inside lie had built twelve sties nearone another for the sows to lie in. There were fifty pigs wallowing ineach sty, all of them breeding sows; but the boars slept outside andwere much fewer in number, for the suitors kept on eating them, anddie swineherd had to send them the best he had continually. There werethree hundred and sixty boar pigs, and the herdsman's four hounds,which were as fierce as wolves, slept always with them. Theswineherd was at that moment cutting out a pair of sandals from a goodstout ox hide. Three of his men were out herding the pigs in one placeor another, and he had sent the fourth to town with a boar that he hadbeen forced to send the suitors that they might sacrifice it andhave their fill of meat.
4、  "I was told all this by Calypso, who said she had heard it fromthe mouth of Mercury.
5、  As he spoke Jove sent two eagles from the top of the mountain, andthey flew on and on with the wind, sailing side by side in their ownlordly flight. When they were right over the middle of the assemblythey wheeled and circled about, beating the air with their wings andglaring death into the eyes of them that were below; then, fightingfiercely and tearing at one another, they flew off towards the rightover the town. The people wondered as they saw them, and asked eachother what an this might be; whereon Halitherses, who was the bestprophet and reader of omens among them, spoke to them plainly and inall honesty, saying:

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  • 桑塔纳 08-08

      Ulysses was glad when he heard the omens conveyed to him by thewoman's speech, and by the thunder, for he knew they meant that heshould avenge himself on the suitors.

  • 周杰伦 08-08

      Telemachus saw her long before any one else did. He was sittingmoodily among the suitors thinking about his brave father, and howhe would send them flying out of the house, if he were to come tohis own again and be honoured as in days gone by. Thus brooding ashe sat among them, he caught sight of Minerva and went straight to thegate, for he was vexed that a stranger should be kept waiting foradmittance. He took her right hand in his own, and bade her give himher spear. "Welcome," said he, "to our house, and when you havepartaken of food you shall tell us what you have come for."

  • 林奋强 08-08

       "You want to know,' said he, 'about your return home, but heavenwill make this hard for you. I do not think that you will escape theeye of Neptune, who still nurses his bitter grudge against you forhaving blinded his son. Still, after much suffering you may get homeif you can restrain yourself and your companions when your shipreaches the Thrinacian island, where you will find the sheep andcattle belonging to the sun, who sees and gives ear to everything.If you leave these flocks unharmed and think of nothing but of gettinghome, you may yet after much hardship reach Ithaca; but if you harmthem, then I forewarn you of the destruction both of your ship andof your men. Even though you may yourself escape, you will return inbad plight after losing all your men, [in another man's ship, andyou will find trouble in your house, which will be overrun byhigh-handed people, who are devouring your substance under the pretextof paying court and making presents to your wife.

  • 王彬 08-08

      "Call him here, then," said Penelope, "that I too may hear hisstory. As for the suitors, let them take their pleasure indoors or outas they will, for they have nothing to fret about. Their corn and wineremain unwasted in their houses with none but servants to consumethem, while they keep hanging about our house day after daysacrificing our oxen, sheep, and fat goats for their banquets, andnever giving so much as a thought to the quantity of wine theydrink. No estate can stand such recklessness, for we have now noUlysses to protect us. If he were to come again, he and his sonwould soon have their revenge."

  • 姚慕双 08-07

    {  "Hear me, O King, whoever you may be, and save me from the angerof the sea-god Neptune, for I approach you prayerfully. Any one whohas lost his way has at all times a claim even upon the gods,wherefore in my distress I draw near to your stream, and cling tothe knees of your riverhood. Have mercy upon me, O king, for I declaremyself your suppliant."

  • 石泉山 08-06

      "For shame," replied Minerva, "why, any one else would trust a worseally than myself, even though that ally were only a mortal and lesswise than I am. Am I not a goddess, and have I not protected youthroughout in all your troubles? I tell you plainly that even thoughthere were fifty bands of men surrounding us and eager to kill us, youshould take all their sheep and cattle, and drive them away withyou. But go to sleep; it is a very bad thing to lie awake all night,and you shall be out of your troubles before long."}

  • 萨宾·凯姆 08-06

      "And I saw Tityus son of Gaia stretched upon the plain andcovering some nine acres of ground. Two vultures on either side of himwere digging their beaks into his liver, and he kept on trying to beatthem off with his hands, but could not; for he had violated Jove'smistress Leto as she was going through Panopeus on her way to Pytho.

  • 金丽来 08-06

      "Good heavens, this voyage of Telemachus is a very serious matter;we had made sure that it would come to nothing, but the young fellowhas got away in spite of us, and with a picked crew too. He will begiving us trouble presently; may Jove take him before he is fullgrown. Find me a ship, therefore, with a crew of twenty men, and Iwill lie in wait for him in the straits between Ithaca and Samos; hewill then rue the day that he set out to try and get news of hisfather."

  • 莫雷签 08-05

       "Come on each of you in his turn, going towards the right from theplace at which the. cupbearer begins when he is handing round thewine."

  • 卫立球 08-03

    {  "'You dare-devil,' replied the goddess, you are always wanting tofight somebody or something; you will not let yourself be beateneven by the immortals. For Scylla is not mortal; moreover she issavage, extreme, rude, cruel and invincible. There is no help forit; your best chance will be to get by her as fast as ever you can,for if you dawdle about her rock while you are putting on your armour,she may catch you with a second cast of her six heads, and snap upanother half dozen of your men; so drive your ship past her at fullspeed, and roar out lustily to Crataiis who is Scylla's dam, badluck to her; she will then stop her from making a second raid uponyou.

  • 徐自成 08-03

      He counted his goodly coppers and cauldrons, his gold and all hisclothes, but there was nothing missing; still he kept grieving aboutnot being in his own country, and wandered up and down by the shore ofthe sounding sea bewailing his hard fate. Then Minerva came up tohim disguised as a young shepherd of delicate and princely mien,with a good cloak folded double about her shoulders; she had sandalson her comely feet and held a javelin in her hand. Ulysses was gladwhen he saw her, and went straight up to her.

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