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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:列克 大小:47Y0HDcu86556KB 下载:yKrRyJJ390571次
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日期:2020-08-05 07:03:02
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  This made Antinous very angry, and he scowled at him saying, "Youshall pay for this before you get clear of the court." With thesewords he threw a footstool at him, and hit him on the rightshoulder-blade near the top of his back. Ulysses stood firm as arock and the blow did not even stagger him, but he shook his head insilence as he brooded on his revenge. Then he went back to thethreshold and sat down there, laying his well-filled wallet at hisfeet.
2.  But she would not give him full victory as yet, for she wished stillfurther to prove his own prowess and that of his brave son, so sheflew up to one of the rafters in the roof of the cloister and sat uponit in the form of a swallow.
3.  With these words he girded the sword about his shoulders and towardssundown the presents began to make their appearance, as the servantsof the donors kept bringing them to the house of King Alcinous; herehis sons received them, and placed them under their mother's charge.Then Alcinous led the way to the house and bade his guests taketheir seats.
4.  "Thus did they speak, but I answered sorrowfully, 'My men haveundone me; they, and cruel sleep, have ruined me. My friends, mendme this mischief, for you can if you will.'
5.  The old woman swore most solemnly that she would not, and when shehad completed her oath, she began drawing off the wine into jars,and getting the barley meal into the bags, while Telemachus wentback to the suitors.
6.  "She came to me one day when I was by myself, as I often was, forthe men used to go with their barbed hooks, all over the island in thehope of catching a fish or two to save them from the pangs ofhunger. 'Stranger,' said she, 'it seems to me that you like starvingin this way- at any rate it does not greatly trouble you, for youstick here day after day, without even trying to get away thoughyour men are dying by inches.'

计划指导

1.  With these words he girded the sword about his shoulders and towardssundown the presents began to make their appearance, as the servantsof the donors kept bringing them to the house of King Alcinous; herehis sons received them, and placed them under their mother's charge.Then Alcinous led the way to the house and bade his guests taketheir seats.
2.  To this Eurymachus son of Polybus answered, "Take heart, QueenPenelope daughter of Icarius, and do not trouble yourself aboutthese matters. The man is not yet born, nor never will be, who shalllay hands upon your son Telemachus, while I yet live to look uponthe face of the earth. I say- and it shall surely be- that my spearshall be reddened with his blood; for many a time has Ulysses taken meon his knees, held wine up to my lips to drink, and put pieces of meatinto my hands. Therefore Telemachus is much the dearest friend I have,and has nothing to fear from the hands of us suitors. Of course, ifdeath comes to him from the gods, he cannot escape it." He said thisto quiet her, but in reality he was plotting against Telemachus.
3.  BOOK XXII.
4.  Eurymachus was furious at all this. He scowled at him and cried,"You wretch, I will soon pay you out for daring to say such thingsto me, and in public too. Has the wine been getting into your heador do you always babble in this way? You seem to have lost your witsbecause you beat the tramp Irus. With this he caught hold of afootstool, but Ulysses sought protection at the knees of Amphinomus ofDulichium, for he was afraid. The stool hit the cupbearer on his righthand and knocked him down: the man fell with a cry flat on his back,and his wine-jug fell ringing to the ground. The suitors in thecovered cloister were now in an uproar, and one would turn towards hisneighbour, saying, "I wish the stranger had gone somewhere else, badluck to hide, for all the trouble he gives us. We cannot permit suchdisturbance about a beggar; if such ill counsels are to prevail weshall have no more pleasure at our banquet."
5.  Thus did he speak. His hearers all of them approved his saying andagreed that he should have his escort inasmuch as he had spokenreasonably. Alcinous therefore said to his servant, "Pontonous, mixsome wine and hand it round to everybody, that we may offer a prayerto father Jove, and speed our guest upon his way."
6.  "And I said, 'Agamemnon, why do you ask me? I do not know whetheryour son is alive or dead, and it is not right to talk when one doesnot know.'

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1.  And Jove said, "My child, what are you talking about? How can Iforget Ulysses than whom there is no more capable man on earth, normore liberal in his offerings to the immortal gods that live inheaven? Bear in mind, however, that Neptune is still furious withUlysses for having blinded an eye of Polyphemus king of theCyclopes. Polyphemus is son to Neptune by the nymph Thoosa, daughterto the sea-king Phorcys; therefore though he will not kill Ulyssesoutright, he torments him by preventing him from getting home.Still, let us lay our heads together and see how we can help him toreturn; Neptune will then be pacified, for if we are all of a mindhe can hardly stand out against us."
2.  This was his story, but Ulysses went on eating and drinkingravenously without a word, brooding his revenge. When he had eatenenough and was satisfied, the swineherd took the bowl from which heusually drank, filled it with wine, and gave it to Ulysses, who waspleased, and said as he took it in his hands, "My friend, who was thismaster of yours that bought you and paid for you, so rich and sopowerful as you tell me? You say he perished in the cause of KingAgamemnon; tell me who he was, in case I may have met with such aperson. Jove and the other gods know, but I may be able to give younews of him, for I have travelled much."
3.  The others applauded what Antinous had said, and each one sent hisservant to bring his present. Antinous's man returned with a large andlovely dress most exquisitely embroidered. It had twelve beautifullymade brooch pins of pure gold with which to fasten it. Eurymachusimmediately brought her a magnificent chain of gold and amber beadsthat gleamed like sunlight. Eurydamas's two men returned with someearrings fashioned into three brilliant pendants which glistenedmost beautifully; while king Pisander son of Polyctor gave her anecklace of the rarest workmanship, and every one else brought her abeautiful present of some kind.
4.  "'Strangers, who are you? Where do sail from? Are you traders, or doyou sail the as rovers, with your hands against every man, and everyman's hand against you?'
5.   As he spoke he bound his girdle round him and went to the stieswhere the young sucking pigs were penned. He picked out two which hebrought back with him and sacrificed. He singed them, cut them up, andspitted on them; when the meat was cooked he brought it all in and setit before Ulysses, hot and still on the spit, whereon Ulyssessprinkled it over with white barley meal. The swineherd then mixedwine in a bowl of ivy-wood, and taking a seat opposite Ulysses toldhim to begin.
6.  Now when the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared,Nestor left his couch and took his seat on the benches of white andpolished marble that stood in front of his house. Here aforetime satNeleus, peer of gods in counsel, but he was now dead, and had goneto the house of Hades; so Nestor sat in his seat, sceptre in hand,as guardian of the public weal. His sons as they left their roomsgathered round him, Echephron, Stratius, Perseus, Aretus, andThrasymedes; the sixth son was Pisistratus, and when Telemachus joinedthem they made him sit with them. Nestor then addressed them.

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1.  "It was day-break by the time she had done speaking, so shedressed me in my shirt and cloak. As for herself she threw a beautifullight gossamer fabric over her shoulders, fastening it with a goldengirdle round her waist, and she covered her head with a mantle. Then Iwent about among the men everywhere all over the house, and spokekindly to each of them man by man: 'You must not lie sleeping here anylonger,' said I to them, 'we must be going, for Circe has told meall about it.' And this they did as I bade them.
2.  Then Ulysses said, "Sir, it is right that I should say somethingmyself. I am much shocked about what you have said about theinsolent way in which the suitors are behaving in despite of such aman as you are. Tell me, do you submit to such treatment tamely, orhas some god set your people against you? May you not complain of yourbrothers- for it is to these that a man may look for support,however great his quarrel may be? I wish I were as young as you areand in my present mind; if I were son to Ulysses, or, indeed,Ulysses himself, I would rather some one came and cut my head off, butI would go to the house and be the bane of every one of these men.If they were too many for me- I being single-handed- I would ratherdie fighting in my own house than see such disgraceful sights dayafter day, strangers grossly maltreated, and men dragging the womenservants about the house in an unseemly way, wine drawn recklessly,and bread wasted all to no purpose for an end that shall never beaccomplished."
3.  Thus spoke Minerva, and Ulysses obeyed her gladly. Then Minervaassumed the form and voice of Mentor, and presently made a covenant ofpeace between the two contending parties.
4、  "Take my advice then, and do not go travelling about for long so farfrom home, nor leave your property with such dangerous people inyour house; they will eat up everything you have among them, and youwill have been on a fool's errand. Still, I should advise you by allmeans to go and visit Menelaus, who has lately come off a voyage amongsuch distant peoples as no man could ever hope to get back from,when the winds had once carried him so far out of his reckoning;even birds cannot fly the distance in a twelvemonth, so vast andterrible are the seas that they must cross. Go to him, therefore, bysea, and take your own men with you; or if you would rather travelby land you can have a chariot, you can have horses, and here are mysons who can escort you to Lacedaemon where Menelaus lives. Beg of himto speak the truth, and he will tell you no lies, for he is anexcellent person."
5、  While Ulysses was thus yielding himself to a very deep slumberthat eased the burden of his sorrows, his admirable wife awoke, andsitting up in her bed began to cry. When she had relieved herself byweeping she prayed to Diana saying, "Great Goddess Diana, daughterof Jove, drive an arrow into my heart and slay me; or let somewhirlwind snatch me up and bear me through paths of darkness till itdrop me into the mouths of overflowing Oceanus, as it did thedaughters of Pandareus. The daughters of Pandareus lost their fatherand mother, for the gods killed them, so they were left orphans. ButVenus took care of them, and fed them on cheese, honey, and sweetwine. Juno taught them to excel all women in beauty of form andunderstanding; Diana gave them an imposing presence, and Minervaendowed them with every kind of accomplishment; but one day when Venushad gone up to Olympus to see Jove about getting them married (forwell does he know both what shall happen and what not happen toevery one) the storm winds came and spirited them away to becomehandmaids to the dread Erinyes. Even so I wish that the gods wholive in heaven would hide me from mortal sight, or that fair Dianamight strike me, for I would fain go even beneath the sad earth if Imight do so still looking towards Ulysses only, and without havingto yield myself to a worse man than he was. Besides, no matter howmuch people may grieve by day, they can put up with it so long as theycan sleep at night, for when the eyes are closed in slumber peopleforget good and ill alike; whereas my misery haunts me even in mydreams. This very night methought there was one lying by my side whowas like Ulysses as he was when he went away with his host, and Irejoiced, for I believed that it was no dream, but the very truthitself."

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  • 李春梅 08-04

      "We were frightened out of our senses by his loud voice andmonstrous form, but I managed to say, 'We are Achaeans on our way homefrom Troy, but by the will of Jove, and stress of weather, we havebeen driven far out of our course. We are the people of Agamemnon, sonof Atreus, who has won infinite renown throughout the whole world,by sacking so great a city and killing so many people. We thereforehumbly pray you to show us some hospitality, and otherwise make ussuch presents as visitors may reasonably expect. May your excellencyfear the wrath of heaven, for we are your suppliants, and Jove takesall respectable travellers under his protection, for he is the avengerof all suppliants and foreigners in distress.'

  • 熊建中 08-04

      "Queen Arete," he exclaimed, "daughter of great Rhexenor, in mydistress I humbly pray you, as also your husband and these your guests(whom may heaven prosper with long life and happiness, and may theyleave their possessions to their children, and all the honoursconferred upon them by the state) to help me home to my own country assoon as possible; for I have been long in trouble and away from myfriends."

  • 赵志光 08-04

       Then it vanished through the thong-hole of the door and wasdissipated into thin air; but Penelope rose from her sleep refreshedand comforted, so vivid had been her dream.

  • 朱鸿 08-04

      Thus spoke Menelaus, and the heart of Telemachus yearned as hebethought him of his father. Tears fell from his eyes as he heardhim thus mentioned, so that he held his cloak before his face withboth hands. When Menelaus saw this he doubted whether to let himchoose his own time for speaking, or to ask him at once and findwhat it was all about.

  • 何明华 08-03

    {  Now when Laertes and the others had done dinner, Ulysses began bysaying, "Some of you go out and see if they are not getting close upto us." So one of Dolius's sons went as he was bid. Standing on thethreshold he could see them all quite near, and said to Ulysses, "Herethey are, let us put on our armour at once."

  • 苏蔡 08-02

      "On this he groaned, and cried out, 'Alas, alas, then the oldprophecy about me is coming true. There was a prophet here, at onetime, a man both brave and of great stature, Telemus son of Eurymus,who was an excellent seer, and did all the prophesying for theCyclopes till he grew old; he told me that all this would happen to mesome day, and said I should lose my sight by the hand of Ulysses. Ihave been all along expecting some one of imposing presence andsuperhuman strength, whereas he turns out to be a little insignificantweakling, who has managed to blind my eye by taking advantage of me inmy drink; come here, then, Ulysses, that I may make you presents toshow my hospitality, and urge Neptune to help you forward on yourjourney- for Neptune and I are father and son. He, if he so will,shall heal me, which no one else neither god nor man can do.'}

  • 李娥姿 08-02

      "What an exquisitely delicious sleep I have been having," saidshe, as she passed her hands over her face, "in spite of all mymisery. I wish Diana would let me die so sweetly now at this verymoment, that I might no longer waste in despair for the loss of mydear husband, who possessed every kind of good quality and was themost distinguished man among the Achaeans."

  • 洪肯 08-02

      THUS did he speak, and they all held their peace throughout thecovered cloister, enthralled by the charm of his story, till presentlyAlcinous began to speak.

  • 郭安 08-01

       And Penelope answered, "Stranger, dreams are very curious andunaccountable things, and they do not by any means invariably cometrue. There are two gates through which these unsubstantial fanciesproceed; the one is of horn, and the other ivory. Those that comethrough the gate of ivory are fatuous, but those from the gate of hornmean something to those that see them. I do not think, however, thatmy own dream came through the gate of horn, though I and my son shouldbe most thankful if it proves to have done so. Furthermore I say-and lay my saying to your heart- the coming dawn will usher in theill-omened day that is to sever me from the house of Ulysses, for I amabout to hold a tournament of axes. My husband used to set up twelveaxes in the court, one in front of the other, like the stays uponwhich a ship is built; he would then go back from them and shoot anarrow through the whole twelve. I shall make the suitors try to do thesame thing, and whichever of them can string the bow most easily,and send his arrow through all the twelve axes, him will I follow, andquit this house of my lawful husband, so goodly and so abounding inwealth. But even so, I doubt not that I shall remember it in mydreams."

  • 葛千松 07-30

    {  "Then I said, 'I wish I could be as sure of killing you outright andsending you down to the house of Hades, as I am that it will take morethan Neptune to cure that eye of yours.'

  • 赵佩娟 07-30

      "I will tell you the truth, my son," replied Ulysses. "It was thePhaeacians who brought me here. They are great sailors, and are in thehabit of giving escorts to any one who reaches their coasts. They tookme over the sea while I was fast asleep, and landed me in Ithaca,after giving me many presents in bronze, gold, and raiment. Thesethings by heaven's mercy are lying concealed in a cave, and I am nowcome here on the suggestion of Minerva that we may consult aboutkilling our enemies. First, therefore, give me a list of thesuitors, with their number, that I may learn who, and how many, theyare. I can then turn the matter over in my mind, and see whether wetwo can fight the whole body of them ourselves, or whether we mustfind others to help us."

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