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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:朱佳 大小:GxFh0whm76390KB 下载:nH7HjldV86245次
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日期:2020-08-07 16:06:10
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Telemachus, you should not remain so far away from home any longer,nor leave your property with such dangerous people in your house; theywill eat up everything you have among them, and you will have beenon a fool's errand. Ask Menelaus to send you home at once if youwish to find your excellent mother still there when you get back.Her father and brothers are already urging her to marry Eurymachus,who has given her more than any of the others, and has been greatlyincreasing his wedding presents. I hope nothing valuable may have beentaken from the house in spite of you, but you know what women are-they always want to do the best they can for the man who marries them,and never give another thought to the children of their first husband,nor to their father either when he is dead and done with. Go home,therefore, and put everything in charge of the most respectablewoman servant that you have, until it shall please heaven to sendyou a wife of your own. Let me tell you also of another matter whichyou had better attend to. The chief men among the suitors are lying inwait for you in the Strait between Ithaca and Samos, and they meanto kill you before you can reach home. I do not much think they willsucceed; it is more likely that some of those who are now eating upyour property will find a grave themselves. Sail night and day, andkeep your ship well away from the islands; the god who watches overyou and protects you will send you a fair wind. As soon as you getto Ithaca send your ship and men on to the town, but yourself gostraight to the swineherd who has charge your pigs; he is welldisposed towards you, stay with him, therefore, for the night, andthen send him to Penelope to tell her that you have got back safe fromPylos."
2.  Ulysses answered, "Madam, I have foresworn rugs and blankets fromthe day that I left the snowy ranges of Crete to go on shipboard. Iwill lie as I have lain on many a sleepless night hitherto. Nightafter night have I passed in any rough sleeping place, and waitedfor morning. Nor, again, do I like having my feet washed; I shallnot let any of the young hussies about your house touch my feet;but, if you have any old and respectable woman who has gone through asmuch trouble as I have, I will allow her to wash them."
3.  Then turning to Ulysses he said, "Stranger, will you work as aservant, if I send you to the wolds and see that you are well paid?Can you build a stone fence, or plant trees? I will have you fed allthe year round, and will find you in shoes and clothing. Will yougo, then? Not you; for you have got into bad ways, and do not wantto work; you had rather fill your belly by going round the countrybegging."
4.  "When they reached Circe's house they found it built of cutstones, on a site that could be seen from far, in the middle of theforest. There were wild mountain wolves and lions prowling all roundit- poor bewitched creatures whom she had tamed by her enchantmentsand drugged into subjection. They did not attack my men, but waggedtheir great tails, fawned upon them, and rubbed their noses lovinglyagainst them. As hounds crowd round their master when they see himcoming from dinner- for they know he will bring them something- evenso did these wolves and lions with their great claws fawn upon my men,but the men were terribly frightened at seeing such strange creatures.Presently they reached the gates of the goddess's house, and as theystood there they could hear Circe within, singing most beautifullyas she worked at her loom, making a web so fine, so soft, and ofsuch dazzling colours as no one but a goddess could weave. On thisPolites, whom I valued and trusted more than any other of my men,said, 'There is some one inside working at a loom and singing mostbeautifully; the whole place resounds with it, let us call her and seewhether she is woman or goddess.'
5.  BOOK III.
6.  With these words he moved the heart of Penelope. Then Theoclymenussaid to her:

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1.  When Menelaus heard this he immediately told his wife and servantsto prepare a sufficient dinner from what there might be in thehouse. At this moment Eteoneus joined him, for he lived close by andhad just got up; so Menelaus told him to light the fire and cooksome meat, which he at once did. Then Menelaus went down into hisfragrant store room, not alone, but Helen went too, withMegapenthes. When he reached the place where the treasures of hishouse were kept, he selected a double cup, and told his sonMegapenthes to bring also a silver mixing-bowl. Meanwhile Helen wentto the chest where she kept the lovely dresses which she had made withher own hands, and took out one that was largest and mostbeautifully enriched with embroidery; it glittered like a star, andlay at the very bottom of the chest. Then they all came back throughthe house again till they got to Telemachus, and Menelaus said,"Telemachus, may Jove, the mighty husband of Juno, bring you safelyhome according to your desire. I will now present you with thefinest and most precious piece of plate in all my house. It is amixing-bowl of pure silver, except the rim, which is inlaid with gold,and it is the work of Vulcan. Phaedimus king of the Sidonians mademe a present of it in the course of a visit that I paid him while Iwas on my return home. I should like to give it to you."
2.  "When I had nearly got back to the ship some god took pity upon mysolitude, and sent a fine antlered stag right into the middle of mypath. He was coming down his pasture in the forest to drink of theriver, for the heat of the sun drove him, and as he passed I struckhim in the middle of the back; the bronze point of the spear wentclean through him, and he lay groaning in the dust until the life wentout of him. Then I set my foot upon him, drew my spear from the wound,and laid it down; I also gathered rough grass and rushes and twistedthem into a fathom or so of good stout rope, with which I bound thefour feet of the noble creature together; having so done I hung himround my neck and walked back to the ship leaning upon my spear, forthe stag was much too big for me to be able to carry him on myshoulder, steadying him with one hand. As I threw him down in front ofthe ship, I called the men and spoke cheeringly man by man to eachof them. 'Look here my friends,' said I, 'we are not going to die somuch before our time after all, and at any rate we will not starveso long as we have got something to eat and drink on board.' On thisthey uncovered their heads upon the sea shore and admired the stag,for he was indeed a splendid fellow. Then, when they had feasted theireyes upon him sufficiently, they washed their hands and began tocook him for dinner.
3.  Then she called her maids and said, "Stay where you are, yougirls. Can you not see a man without running away from him? Do youtake him for a robber or a murderer? Neither he nor any one else cancome here to do us Phaeacians any harm, for we are dear to the gods,and live apart on a land's end that juts into the sounding sea, andhave nothing to do with any other people. This is only some poor manwho has lost his way, and we must be kind to him, for strangers andforeigners in distress are under Jove's protection, and will take whatthey can get and be thankful; so, girls, give the poor fellowsomething to eat and drink, and wash him in the stream at some placethat is sheltered from the wind."
4.  "I understand and heed you," replied Eumaeus; "you need instructme no further, only I am going that way say whether I had not betterlet poor Laertes know that you are returned. He used to superintendthe work on his farm in spite of his bitter sorrow about Ulysses,and he would eat and drink at will along with his servants; but theytell me that from the day on which you set out for Pylos he hasneither eaten nor drunk as he ought to do, nor does he look afterhis farm, but sits weeping and wasting the flesh from off his bones."
5.  Thus did they converse, and meanwhile the ship which had broughtTelemachus and his crew from Pylos had reached the town of Ithaca.When they had come inside the harbour they drew the ship on to theland; their servants came and took their armour from them, and theyleft all the presents at the house of Clytius. Then they sent aservant to tell Penelope that Telemachus had gone into the country,but had sent the ship to the town to prevent her from being alarmedand made unhappy. This servant and Eumaeus happened to meet whenthey were both on the same errand of going to tell Penelope. When theyreached the House, the servant stood up and said to the queen in thepresence of the waiting women, "Your son, Madam, is now returnedfrom Pylos"; but Eumaeus went close up to Penelope, and said privatelythat her son had given bidden him tell her. When he had given hismessage he left the house with its outbuildings and went back to hispigs again.
6.  Then the dear old nurse Euryclea said, "You may kill me, Madam, orlet me live on in your house, whichever you please, but I will tellyou the real truth. I knew all about it, and gave him everything hewanted in the way of bread and wine, but he made me take my solemnoath that I would not tell you anything for some ten or twelve days,unless you asked or happened to hear of his having gone, for he didnot want you to spoil your beauty by crying. And now, Madam, wash yourface, change your dress, and go upstairs with your maids to offerprayers to Minerva, daughter of Aegis-bearing Jove, for she can savehim even though he be in the jaws of death. Do not trouble Laertes: hehas trouble enough already. Besides, I cannot think that the gods hatedie race of the race of the son of Arceisius so much, but there willbe a son left to come up after him, and inherit both the house and thefair fields that lie far all round it."

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1.  Then Minerva said to Jove, "Father, son of Saturn, king of kings,answer me this question- What do you propose to do? Will you setthem fighting still further, or will you make peace between them?"
2.  Thus did he pray, and Minerva heard his prayer, but she would notshow herself to him openly, for she was afraid of her uncle Neptune,who was still furious in his endeavors to prevent Ulysses from gettinghome.
3.  "We lit a fire, offered some of the cheeses in sacrifice, ate othersof them, and then sat waiting till the Cyclops should come in with hissheep. When he came, he brought in with him a huge load of dryfirewood to light the fire for his supper, and this he flung with sucha noise on to the floor of his cave that we hid ourselves for fearat the far end of the cavern. Meanwhile he drove all the ewesinside, as well as the she-goats that he was going to milk, leavingthe males, both rams and he-goats, outside in the yards. Then herolled a huge stone to the mouth of the cave- so huge that two andtwenty strong four-wheeled waggons would not be enough to draw it fromits place against the doorway. When he had so done he sat down andmilked his ewes and goats, all in due course, and then let each ofthem have her own young. He curdled half the milk and set it asidein wicker strainers, but the other half he poured into bowls that hemight drink it for his supper. When he had got through with all hiswork, he lit the fire, and then caught sight of us, whereon he said:
4.  BUT Minerva went to the fair city of Lacedaemon to tell Ulysses' sonthat he was to return at once. She found him and Pisistratussleeping in the forecourt of Menelaus's house; Pisistratus was fastasleep, but Telemachus could get no rest all night for thinking of hisunhappy father, so Minerva went close up to him and said:
5.   Then Euryalus reviled him outright and said, "I gather, then, thatyou are unskilled in any of the many sports that men generally delightin. I suppose you are one of those grasping traders that go about inships as captains or merchants, and who think of nothing but oftheir outward freights and homeward cargoes. There does not seem to bemuch of the athlete about you."
6.  On these words the old woman covered her face with her hands; shebegan to weep and made lamentation saying, "My dear child, I cannotthink whatever I am to do with you. I am certain no one was evermore god-fearing than yourself, and yet Jove hates you. No one inthe whole world ever burned him more thigh bones, nor gave him finerhecatombs when you prayed you might come to a green old age yourselfand see your son grow up to take after you; yet see how he hasprevented you alone from ever getting back to your own home. I have nodoubt the women in some foreign palace which Ulysses has got to aregibing at him as all these sluts here have been gibing you. I do notwonder at your not choosing to let them wash you after the manner inwhich they have insulted you; I will wash your feet myself gladlyenough, as Penelope has said that I am to do so; I will wash them bothfor Penelope's sake and for your own, for you have raised the mostlively feelings of compassion in my mind; and let me say thismoreover, which pray attend to; we have had all kinds of strangersin distress come here before now, but I make bold to say that no oneever yet came who was so like Ulysses in figure, voice, and feet asyou are."

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1.  To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "The stranger is quitereasonable. He is avoiding the suitors, and is only doing what any oneelse would do. He asks you to wait till sundown, and it will be muchbetter, madam, that you should have him all to yourself, when youcan hear him and talk to him as you will."
2.  "I will tell you everything," answered Ulysses, "quite truly. I comefrom Alybas, where I have a fine house. I am son of king Apheidas, whois the son of Polypemon. My own name is Eperitus; heaven drove meoff my course as I was leaving Sicania, and I have been carried hereagainst my will. As for my ship it is lying over yonder, off theopen country outside the town, and this is the fifth year sinceUlysses left my country. Poor fellow, yet the omens were good forhim when he left me. The birds all flew on our right hands, and bothhe and I rejoiced to see them as we parted, for we had every hope thatwe should have another friendly meeting and exchange presents."
3.  "Here I am, my dear sir," said he, "stay your hand therefore, andtell your father, or he will kill me in his rage against the suitorsfor having wasted his substance and been so foolishly disrespectful toyourself."
4、  With these words she came down from her upper room, not alone butattended by two of her maidens, and when she reached the suitors shestood by one of the bearing-posts supporting the roof of the cloister,holding a veil before her face, and with a staid maid servant oneither side of her. As they beheld her the suitors were so overpoweredand became so desperately enamoured of her, that each one prayed hemight win her for his own bed fellow.
5、  This was what they said, but they did not know what it was thathad been happening. The upper servant Eurynome washed and anointedUlysses in his own house and gave him a shirt and cloak, while Minervamade him look taller and stronger than before; she also made thehair grow thick on the top of his head, and flow down in curls likehyacinth blossoms; she glorified him about the head and shoulders justas a skilful workman who has studied art of all kinds under Vulcanor Minerva- and his work is full of beauty- enriches a piece of silverplate by gilding it. He came from the bath looking like one of theimmortals, and sat down opposite his wife on the seat he had left. "Mydear," said he, "heaven has endowed you with a heart more unyieldingthan woman ever yet had. No other woman could bear to keep away fromher husband when he had come back to her after twenty years ofabsence, and after having gone through so much. But come, nurse, get abed ready for me; I will sleep alone, for this woman has a heart ashard as iron."

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  • 江召 08-06

      NOW when the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared,Telemachus rose and dressed himself. He bound his sandals on to hiscomely feet, girded his sword about his shoulder, and left his roomlooking like an immortal god. He at once sent the criers round to callthe people in assembly, so they called them and the people gatheredthereon; then, when they were got together, he went to the place ofassembly spear in hand- not alone, for his two hounds went with him.Minerva endowed him with a presence of such divine comeliness that allmarvelled at him as he went by, and when he took his place' in hisfather's seat even the oldest councillors made way for him.

  • 郑位三 08-06

      Now Venus was just come in from a visit to her father Jove, andwas about sitting down when Mars came inside the house, an said ashe took her hand in his own, "Let us go to the couch of Vulcan: heis not at home, but is gone off to Lemnos among the Sintians, whosespeech is barbarous."

  • 奥斯汀·里弗斯 08-06

       Then Euryalus reviled him outright and said, "I gather, then, thatyou are unskilled in any of the many sports that men generally delightin. I suppose you are one of those grasping traders that go about inships as captains or merchants, and who think of nothing but oftheir outward freights and homeward cargoes. There does not seem to bemuch of the athlete about you."

  • 俞月花 08-06

      The suitors bit their lips, and marvelled at the boldness of hisspeech; then Antinous said, "We do not like such language but wewill put up with it, for Telemachus is threatening us in good earnest.If Jove had let us we should have put a stop to his brave talk erenow."

  • 郝绪光 08-05

    {  THEN Ulysses tore off his rags, and sprang on to the broadpavement with his bow and his quiver full of arrows. He shed thearrows on to the ground at his feet and said, "The mighty contest isat an end. I will now see whether Apollo will vouchsafe it to me tohit another mark which no man has yet hit."

  • 张玉学 08-04

      "'Now there was a watchman whom Aegisthus kept always on thewatch, and to whom he had promised two talents of gold. This man hadbeen looking out for a whole year to make sure that Agamemnon didnot give him the slip and prepare war; when, therefore, this man sawAgamemnon go by, he went and told Aegisthus who at once began to lay aplot for him. He picked twenty of his bravest warriors and placed themin ambuscade on one side the cloister, while on the opposite side heprepared a banquet. Then he sent his chariots and horsemen toAgamemnon, and invited him to the feast, but he meant foul play. Hegot him there, all unsuspicious of the doom that was awaiting him, andkilled him when the banquet was over as though he were butchering anox in the shambles; not one of Agamemnon's followers was left alive,nor yet one of Aegisthus', but they were all killed there in thecloisters.'}

  • 桑珠 08-04

      "When we reached the harbour we found it land-locked under steepcliffs, with a narrow entrance between two headlands. My captains tookall their ships inside, and made them fast close to one another, forthere was never so much as a breath of wind inside, but it wasalways dead calm. I kept my own ship outside, and moored it to arock at the very end of the point; then I climbed a high rock toreconnoitre, but could see no sign neither of man nor cattle, onlysome smoke rising from the ground. So I sent two of my company with anattendant to find out what sort of people the inhabitants were.

  • 石永波 08-04

      "Father Jove," answered the stockman, "would indeed that you mightso ordain it. If some god were but to bring Ulysses back, you shouldsee with what might and main I would fight for him."

  • 谭菊珍 08-03

       "Your guest has not disgraced you, Telemachus. I did not miss what Iaimed at, and I was not long in stringing my bow. I am still strong,and not as the suitors twit me with being. Now, however, it is timefor the Achaeans to prepare supper while there is still daylight,and then otherwise to disport themselves with song and dance which arethe crowning ornaments of a banquet."

  • 李剑锋 08-01

    {  To this Penelope replied, "Eurymachus, heaven robbed me of all mybeauty whether of face or figure when the Argives set sail for Troyand my dear husband with them. If he were to return and look aftermy affairs, I should both be more respected and show a better presenceto the world. As it is, I am oppressed with care, and with theafflictions which heaven has seen fit to heap upon me. My husbandforesaw it all, and when he was leaving home he took my right wrist inhis hand- 'Wife, 'he said, 'we shall not all of us come safe homefrom Troy, for the Trojans fight well both with bow and spear. Theyare excellent also at fighting from chariots, and nothing decidesthe issue of a fight sooner than this. I know not, therefore,whether heaven will send me back to you, or whether I may not fallover there at Troy. In the meantime do you look after things here.Take care of my father and mother as at present, and even more soduring my absence, but when you see our son growing a beard, thenmarry whom you will, and leave this your present home. This is what hesaid and now it is all coming true. A night will come when I shallhave to yield myself to a marriage which I detest, for Jove hastaken from me all hope of happiness. This further grief, moreover,cuts me to the very heart. You suitors are not wooing me after thecustom of my country. When men are courting a woman who they thinkwill be a good wife to them and who is of noble birth, and when theyare each trying to win her for himself, they usually bring oxen andsheep to feast the friends of the lady, and they make hermagnificent presents, instead of eating up other people's propertywithout paying for it."

  • 袁德旺 08-01

      "Eumaeus, I hear footsteps; I suppose one of your men or some one ofyour acquaintance is coming here, for the dogs are fawning urn him andnot barking."

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