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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:塔利斯曼 大小:jbq48nv524208KB 下载:kE5o27Kk83539次
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日期:2020-08-06 07:33:35
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李芸杉

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Sir, my father Nestor, when we used to talk about you at home, toldme you were a person of rare and excellent understanding. If, then, itbe possible, do as I would urge you. I am not fond of crying while Iam getting my supper. Morning will come in due course, and in theforenoon I care not how much I cry for those that are dead and gone.This is all we can do for the poor things. We can only shave our headsfor them and wring the tears from our cheeks. I had a brother who diedat Troy; he was by no means the worst man there; you are sure tohave known him- his name was Antilochus; I never set eyes upon himmyself, but they say that he was singularly fleet of foot and in fightvaliant."
2.  On this Eumaeus took his seat again, and when he had finished hisdinner he left the courts and the cloister with the men at table,and went back to his pigs. As for the suitors, they presently began toamuse themselves with singing and dancing, for it was now getting ontowards evening.
3.  AND ULYSSES answered, "King Alcinous, it is a good thing to hear abard with such a divine voice as this man has. There is nothing betteror more delightful than when a whole people make merry together,with the guests sitting orderly to listen, while the table is loadedwith bread and meats, and the cup-bearer draws wine and fills hiscup for every man. This is indeed as fair a sight as a man can see.Now, however, since you are inclined to ask the story of my sorrows,and rekindle my own sad memories in respect of them, I do not know howto begin, nor yet how to continue and conclude my tale, for the handof heaven has been laid heavily upon me.
4.  "Queen Penelope," answered Eurymachus, "we do not suppose thatthis man will take you away with him; it is impossible; but we areafraid lest some of the baser sort, men or women among the Achaeans,should go gossiping about and say, 'These suitors are a feeble folk;they are paying court to the wife of a brave man whose bow not oneof them was able to string, and yet a beggarly tramp who came to thehouse strung it at once and sent an arrow through the iron.' This iswhat will be said, and it will be a scandal against us."
5.  Then the queen went back to her room upstairs, and her maids broughtthe presents after her. Meanwhile the suitors took to singing anddancing, and stayed till evening came. They danced and sang till itgrew dark; they then brought in three braziers to give light, andpiled them up with chopped firewood very and dry, and they lit torchesfrom them, which the maids held up turn and turn about. Then Ulyssessaid:
6.  BOOK XIII.

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1.  "'My son,' she answered, 'most ill-fated of all mankind, it is notProserpine that is beguiling you, but all people are like this whenthey are dead. The sinews no longer hold the flesh and bones together;these perish in the fierceness of consuming fire as soon as life hasleft the body, and the soul flits away as though it were a dream. Now,however, go back to the light of day as soon as you can, and noteall these things that you may tell them to your wife hereafter.'
2.  "Sir, my father Nestor, when we used to talk about you at home, toldme you were a person of rare and excellent understanding. If, then, itbe possible, do as I would urge you. I am not fond of crying while Iam getting my supper. Morning will come in due course, and in theforenoon I care not how much I cry for those that are dead and gone.This is all we can do for the poor things. We can only shave our headsfor them and wring the tears from our cheeks. I had a brother who diedat Troy; he was by no means the worst man there; you are sure tohave known him- his name was Antilochus; I never set eyes upon himmyself, but they say that he was singularly fleet of foot and in fightvaliant."
3.  "The first I saw was Tyro. She was daughter of Salmoneus and wife ofCretheus the son of Aeolus. She fell in love with the river Enipeuswho is much the most beautiful river in the whole world. Once when shewas taking a walk by his side as usual, Neptune, disguised as herlover, lay with her at the mouth of the river, and a huge blue wavearched itself like a mountain over them to hide both woman and god,whereon he loosed her virgin girdle and laid her in a deep slumber.When the god had accomplished the deed of love, he took her hand inhis own and said, 'Tyro, rejoice in all good will; the embraces of thegods are not fruitless, and you will have fine twins about this timetwelve months. Take great care of them. I am Neptune, so now gohome, but hold your tongue and do not tell any one.'
4.  Meanwhile the bard began to sing the loves of Mars and Venus, andhow they first began their intrigue in the house of Vulcan. Marsmade Venus many presents, and defiled King Vulcan's marriage bed, sothe sun, who saw what they were about, told Vulcan. Vulcan was veryangry when he heard such dreadful news, so he went to his smithybrooding mischief, got his great anvil into its place, and began toforge some chains which none could either unloose or break, so thatthey might stay there in that place. When he had finished his snare hewent into his bedroom and festooned the bed-posts all over with chainslike cobwebs; he also let many hang down from the great beam of theceiling. Not even a god could see them, so fine and subtle werethey. As soon as he had spread the chains all over the bed, he made asthough he were setting out for the fair state of Lemnos, which ofall places in the world was the one he was most fond of. But Mars keptno blind look out, and as soon as he saw him start, hurried off to hishouse, burning with love for Venus.
5.  "See now, how men lay blame upon us gods for what is after allnothing but their own folly. Look at Aegisthus; he must needs makelove to Agamemnon's wife unrighteously and then kill Agamemnon, thoughhe knew it would be the death of him; for I sent Mercury to warn himnot to do either of these things, inasmuch as Orestes would be sure totake his revenge when he grew up and wanted to return home. Mercurytold him this in all good will but he would not listen, and now he haspaid for everything in full."
6.  "Stockman, and you swineherd, I have something in my mind which I amin doubt whether to say or no; but I think I will say it. Whatmanner of men would you be to stand by Ulysses, if some god shouldbring him back here all of a sudden? Say which you are disposed to do-to side with the suitors, or with Ulysses?"

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1.  This was how they talked. But Telemachus went down into the loftyand spacious store-room where his father's treasure of gold and bronzelay heaped up upon the floor, and where the linen and spare clotheswere kept in open chests. Here, too, there was a store of fragrantolive oil, while casks of old, well-ripened wine, unblended and fitfor a god to drink, were ranged against the wall in case Ulyssesshould come home again after all. The room was closed with well-madedoors opening in the middle; moreover the faithful old house-keeperEuryclea, daughter of Ops the son of Pisenor, was in charge ofeverything both night and day. Telemachus called her to the store-roomand said:
2.  And Eumaeus answered, "Old man, you have told us an excellent story,and have said nothing so far but what is quite satisfactory; for thepresent, therefore, you shall want neither clothing nor anythingelse that a stranger in distress may reasonably expect, butto-morrow morning you have to shake your own old rags about yourbody again, for we have not many spare cloaks nor shirts up here,but every man has only one. When Ulysses' son comes home again he willgive you both cloak and shirt, and send you wherever you may want togo."
3.  "May Jove so grant it," replied Telemachus; "if it should prove tobe so, I will make vows to you as though you were a god, even when Iam at home."
4.  "Thus spoke Eurylochus, and the men approved his words. I saw thatheaven meant us a mischief and said, 'You force me to yield, for youare many against one, but at any rate each one of you must take hissolemn oath that if he meet with a herd of cattle or a large flockof sheep, he will not be so mad as to kill a single head of either,but will be satisfied with the food that Circe has given us.'
5.   "'The third man,' he answered, 'is Ulysses who dwells in Ithaca. Ican see him in an island sorrowing bitterly in the house of thenymph Calypso, who is keeping him prisoner, and he cannot reach hishome for he has no ships nor sailors to take him over the sea. Asfor your own end, Menelaus, you shall not die in Argos, but the godswill take you to the Elysian plain, which is at the ends of the world.There fair-haired Rhadamanthus reigns, and men lead an easier lifethan any where else in the world, for in Elysium there falls not rain,nor hail, nor snow, but Oceanus breathes ever with a West wind thatsings softly from the sea, and gives fresh life to all men. Thiswill happen to you because you have married Helen, and are Jove'sson-in-law.'
6.  "Thus, then, did we sit and hold sad talk with one another, I on theone side of the trench with my sword held over the blood, and theghost of my comrade saying all this to me from the other side. Thencame the ghost of my dead mother Anticlea, daughter to Autolycus. Ihad left her alive when I set out for Troy and was moved to tears whenI saw her, but even so, for all my sorrow I would not let her comenear the blood till I had asked my questions of Teiresias.

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1.  "I did not think of asking about that," replied Eumaeus, "when I wasin the town. I thought I would give my message and come back as soonas I could. I met a man sent by those who had gone with you toPylos, and he was the first to tell the new your mother, but I can saywhat I saw with my own eyes; I had just got on to the crest of thehill of Mercury above the town when I saw a ship coming into harbourwith a number of men in her. They had many shields and spears, and Ithought it was the suitors, but I cannot be sure."
2.  Their hearts sank as they heard him, but Eurymachus again spokesaying:
3.  Ulysses shuddered as he heard her. "Now goddess," he answered,"there is something behind all this; you cannot be really meaning tohelp me home when you bid me do such a dreadful thing as put to sea ona raft. Not even a well-found ship with a fair wind could venture onsuch a distant voyage: nothing that you can say or do shall mage me goon board a raft unless you first solemnly swear that you mean me nomischief."
4、  "Those whom you have named," answered Telemachus, "are a couple ofgood allies, for though they dwell high up among the clouds theyhave power over both gods and men."
5、  Eumaeus answered, "Old man, no traveller who comes here with newswill get Ulysses' wife and son to believe his story. Nevertheless,tramps in want of a lodging keep coming with their mouths full oflies, and not a word of truth; every one who finds his way to Ithacagoes to my mistress and tells her falsehoods, whereon she takes themin, makes much of them, and asks them all manner of questions,crying all the time as women will when they have lost theirhusbands. And you too, old man, for a shirt and a cloak woulddoubtless make up a very pretty story. But the wolves and birds ofprey have long since torn Ulysses to pieces, or the fishes of thesea have eaten him, and his bones are lying buried deep in sand uponsome foreign shore; he is dead and gone, and a bad business it isfor all his friends- for me especially; go where I may I shall neverfind so good a master, not even if I were to go home to my motherand father where I was bred and born. I do not so much care,however, about my parents now, though I should dearly like to see themagain in my own country; it is the loss of Ulysses that grieves memost; I cannot speak of him without reverence though he is here nolonger, for he was very fond of me, and took such care of me thatwhereever he may be I shall always honour his memory."

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  • 蔡澈 08-05

      "'I have heard nothing,' I answered, 'of Peleus, but I can tellyou all about your son Neoptolemus, for I took him in my own ship fromScyros with the Achaeans. In our councils of war before Troy he wasalways first to speak, and his judgement was unerring. Nestor and Iwere the only two who could surpass him; and when it came tofighting on the plain of Troy, he would never remain with the bodyof his men, but would dash on far in front, foremost of them all invalour. Many a man did he kill in battle- I cannot name every singleone of those whom he slew while fighting on the side of the Argives,but will only say how he killed that valiant hero Eurypylus son ofTelephus, who was the handsomest man I ever saw except Memnon; manyothers also of the Ceteians fell around him by reason of a woman'sbribes. Moreover, when all the bravest of the Argives went insidethe horse that Epeus had made, and it was left to me to settle when weshould either open the door of our ambuscade, or close it, thoughall the other leaders and chief men among the Danaans were dryingtheir eyes and quaking in every limb, I never once saw him turn palenor wipe a tear from his cheek; he was all the time urging me to breakout from the horse- grasping the handle of his sword and hisbronze-shod spear, and breathing fury against the foe. Yet when we hadsacked the city of Priam he got his handsome share of the prizemoney and went on board (such is the fortune of war) without a woundupon him, neither from a thrown spear nor in close combat, for therage of Mars is a matter of great chance.'

  • 苏日娜 08-05

      Telemachus took this speech as of good omen and rose at once, for hewas bursting with what he had to say. He stood in the middle of theassembly and the good herald Pisenor brought him his staff. Then,turning to Aegyptius, "Sir," said he, "it is I, as you will shortlylearn, who have convened you, for it is I who am the most aggrieved. Ihave not got wind of any host approaching about which I would warnyou, nor is there any matter of public moment on which I wouldspeak. My grieveance is purely personal, and turns on two greatmisfortunes which have fallen upon my house. The first of these is theloss of my excellent father, who was chief among all you here present,and was like a father to every one of you; the second is much moreserious, and ere long will be the utter ruin of my estate. The sons ofall the chief men among you are pestering my mother to marry themagainst her will. They are afraid to go to her father Icarius,asking him to choose the one he likes best, and to provide marriagegifts for his daughter, but day by day they keep hanging about myfather's house, sacrificing our oxen, sheep, and fat goats for theirbanquets, and never giving so much as a thought to the quantity ofwine they drink. No estate can stand such recklessness; we have now noUlysses to ward off harm from our doors, and I cannot hold my ownagainst them. I shall never all my days be as good a man as he was,still I would indeed defend myself if I had power to do so, for Icannot stand such treatment any longer; my house is being disgracedand ruined. Have respect, therefore, to your own consciences and topublic opinion. Fear, too, the wrath of heaven, lest the gods shouldbe displeased and turn upon you. I pray you by Jove and Themis, who isthe beginning and the end of councils, [do not] hold back, my friends,and leave me singlehanded- unless it be that my brave father Ulyssesdid some wrong to the Achaeans which you would now avenge on me, byaiding and abetting these suitors. Moreover, if I am to be eaten outof house and home at all, I had rather you did the eatingyourselves, for I could then take action against you to somepurpose, and serve you with notices from house to house till I gotpaid in full, whereas now I have no remedy."

  • 塞卜哈 08-05

       Leiodes then caught the knees of Ulysses and said, "Ulysses Ibeseech you have mercy upon me and spare me. I never wronged any ofthe women in your house either in word or deed, and I tried to stopthe others. I saw them, but they would not listen, and now they arepaying for their folly. I was their sacrificing priest; if you killme, I shall die without having done anything to deserve it, andshall have got no thanks for all the good that I did."

  • 杨双鱼 08-05

      Menelaus on hearing this was very much shocked. "So," heexclaimed, "these cowards would usurp a brave man's bed? A hindmight as well lay her new born young in the lair of a lion, and thengo off to feed in the forest or in some grassy dell: the lion whenhe comes back to his lair will make short work with the pair ofthem- and so will Ulysses with these suitors. By father Jove, Minerva,and Apollo, if Ulysses is still the man that he was when he wrestledwith Philomeleides in Lesbos, and threw him so heavily that all theAchaeans cheered him- if he is still such and were to come nearthese suitors, they would have a short shrift and a sorry wedding.As regards your questions, however, I will not prevaricate nor deceiveyou, but will tell you without concealment all that the old man of thesea told me.

  • 李禹潼 08-04

    {  As she spoke the goddess dispersed the mist and the land appeared.Then Ulysses rejoiced at finding himself again in his own land, andkissed the bounteous soil; he lifted up his hands and prayed to thenymphs, saying, "Naiad nymphs, daughters of Jove, I made sure that Iwas never again to see you, now therefore I greet you with allloving salutations, and I will bring you offerings as in the old days,if Jove's redoubtable daughter will grant me life, and bring my son tomanhood."

  • 洪显智 08-03

      But Penelope lay in her own room upstairs unable to eat or drink,and wondering whether her brave son would escape, or be overpowered bythe wicked suitors. Like a lioness caught in the toils with huntsmenhemming her in on every side she thought and thought till she sankinto a slumber, and lay on her bed bereft of thought and motion.}

  • 丛树山 08-03

      Ulysses smiled at this, and said to Telemachus, "Let your mother putme to any proof she likes; she will make up her mind about itpresently. She rejects me for the moment and believes me to besomebody else, because I am covered with dirt and have such badclothes on; let us, however, consider what we had better do next. Whenone man has killed another, even though he was not one who would leavemany friends to take up his quarrel, the man who has killed him muststill say good bye to his friends and fly the country; whereas we havebeen killing the stay of a whole town, and all the picked youth ofIthaca. I would have you consider this matter."

  • 利亚 08-03

      "All that you have said is true," answered Euryclea, "but let mebring you some clean clothes- a shirt and cloak. Do not keep theserags on your back any longer. It is not right."

  • 余坪 08-02

       Then Minerva said, "Father, son of Saturn, King of kings, itserved Aegisthus right, and so it would any one else who does as hedid; but Aegisthus is neither here nor there; it is for Ulysses thatmy heart bleeds, when I think of his sufferings in that lonelysea-girt island, far away, poor man, from all his friends. It is anisland covered with forest, in the very middle of the sea, and agoddess lives there, daughter of the magician Atlas, who looks afterthe bottom of the ocean, and carries the great columns that keepheaven and earth asunder. This daughter of Atlas has got hold ofpoor unhappy Ulysses, and keeps trying by every kind of blandishmentto make him forget his home, so that he is tired of life, and thinksof nothing but how he may once more see the smoke of his own chimneys.You, sir, take no heed of this, and yet when Ulysses was before Troydid he not propitiate you with many a burnt sacrifice? Why then shouldyou keep on being so angry with him?"

  • 陈忠和 07-31

    {  "Mother- but you are so hard that I cannot call you by such aname- why do you keep away from my father in this way? Why do younot sit by his side and begin talking to him and asking him questions?No other woman could bear to keep away from her husband when he hadcome back to her after twenty years of absence, and after havinggone through so much; but your heart always was as hard as a stone."

  • 沙特阿尔阿赫利 07-31

      Eurynome brought the seat at once and set a fleece upon it, and assoon as Ulysses had sat down Penelope began by saying, "Stranger, Ishall first ask you who and whence are you? Tell me of your town andparents."

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