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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:丁志军 大小:59pVkyc136719KB 下载:5DgvIoHO15575次
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日期:2020-08-10 08:36:05
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黄妍婷

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Which killes me quite,
2.  Now, in regard that among all other naturall things, no one is lessesubject to take counsell, or can be wrought to contrariety, then Love,whose nature is such, as rather to run upon his owne rash consumption,then to be ruled by admonitions of the very wisest: my memory hathinspired it selfe, with matter incident to this purpose, effectuallyto approve, what I have already said. For I am now to speake of awoman who would appeare to have more wit, then either she hadindeed, or appertained to her by any title. The matter also, whereinshe would needs shew her studious judgement and capacity, was ofmuch more consequence then she could deserve to meddle withall. Yetsuch was the issue of her fond presuming; that (in one instant) sheexpelled both love, and the soule of her owne sonne out of his body,where (doubtlesse) it was planted by divine favour and appointment.
3.  When they were dismounted from their horses, and entred into thesimple Inne: having taken order for feeding their horses, theyaccepted such provision, as the place and time afforded, requestingthe Hoste to suppe with them. Now I am to tell you, that there was butone small Chamsber in the house, wherin stood three beds, as bestthe Hoste had devised to place them, two of them standing by thewalles side, and the third fronting them both, but with such close andnarrow passage, as very hardly could one step betweene them. Thebest of these three beds was appointed for the Gentlemen, andtherein they layd them down to rest, but sleepe they could not, albeitthey dissembled it very formally. In the second Bed was Nicholetta thedaughter, lodged by her selfe, and the father and mother in the third,and because she was to give the child sucke in the night time, theradle (wherein it lay) stood close by their beds side, because thechildes crying or any other occasion concerning it, should notdisquiet the Gentlemen.
4.  "But let us come now to our second reason, wherein, with farregreater instance I will shew you, that he hath (in this occasion)shewen himselfe to be much more wise, then you did, or have done:because it plainely appeareth, that you have no feeling of thedivine providence, and much lesse knowledge in the effects offriendship. I say, that your foresight, councell and deliberation,gave Sophronia to Gisippus, a yong Gentleman, and a Philosopher:Gisippus likewise hath given her to a yong Gentleman, and aPhilosopher, as himselfe is. Your discretion gave her to anAthenian; the gift of Gisippus, is to a Romaine. Yours, to a Noble andhonest man; that of Gisippus, to one more Noble by race, and nolesse honest then himselfe. Your judgement hath bestowed her on a richyoung man: Gisippus hath given her to one farre richer. Yourwisedome gave her to one who not onely loved her not, but also onethat had no desire to know her: Gisippus gave her unto him, who, aboveall felicitie else, yea, more than his owne life, both entirelyloved and desired her.
5.  But he intending to punish her notorious trechery towards him,when she left him as an open scorne to the World, wounded withdisgrace, and quite out of credit with all his friends: she having (ona day) solemnly invited him, to suppe and lodge in her house allnight; he went, both with sad and melancholly lookes, seeming asovercome with extreamity of sorrow. Biancafiore mervayling at thisstrange alteration in him, sweetly kissing and embracing him: wouldneeds know the reason of his passionate affliction, and hepermitting her to urge the question oftentimes together, withoutreturning any direct answere; to quit her in her kind, and withcoine of her owne stampe, after a few dissembled sighes, he began inthis manner.
6.  Gerbino espying his gracious Mistresse on the Ships decke, and sheappearing to be farre more beautifull then Fame had made relation ofher: being much more enflamed now, then formerly he had bin, replyedthus when they shewed the Glove. We have (quoth he) no Faulcon herenow, to be humbled at the sight of your Glove: and therefore, if youwill not deliver the Lady, prepare your selves for fight, for wemust have her whether you will or no. Hereupon, they began to let flie(on both sides) their Darts and arrowes, with stones sent in violentsort from their slings, thus continuing the fight a long while, tovery great harme on either side. At the length, Gerbino perceiving,that small benefit would redound to him, if he did not undertakesome other kinde of course: he tooke a small Pinnace, whichpurposely he brought with him from Sardignia, and setting it on aflaming fire, conveyed it (by the Gallies help) close to the ship. TheSarazines much amazed thereat, and evidently perceiving, that eitherthey must yeeld or dye; brought their Kings daughter to the prow ofthe ship, most greevously weeping and wringing her hands. Then callingGerbino, to let him behold their resolution, there they slew hirbefore his face, and afterward, throwing her body into the Sea, saide:Take her, there we give her to thee, according to our bounden duty,and as thy perjury hath justly deserved.

计划指导

1.  Upon this his private frequentation with the Abbot, at last heobserved, that Ferando had a very beautifull woman to his Wife, withwhom he grew so deeply in love, as he had no other meditationseither by day or night, but how to become acceptable in her favour.Neverthelesse, he concealed his amorous passions privately tohimselfe, and could plainely perceive, that although Ferando (in allthings else) was meerely a simple fellow, and more like an Idiot, thenof any sensible apprehension: yet was he wise enough in loving hisWife, keeping her carfully out of all company, as one (indeede) veryjealous, least any should kisse her, but onely himselfe, which drovethe Abbot into despaire, for ever attaining the issue of his desire.Yet being subtill, crafty, and cautelous, he wrought so on theflexible nature of Ferando, that hee brought his wife with himdivers dayes to the Monasterie; where they walked in the goodlyGarden, discoursing on the beatitudes of eternall life, as also themost holy deedes of men and women, long since departed out of thislife, in mervailous civill and modest manner. Yet all these were buttraines to a further intention, for the Abbot must needes be herghostly Father, and she come to be confessed by him; which the fooleFerando tooke as an especiall favour, and therefore he gave hisconsent the sooner.
2.  Afterward, Thorello (by very much importunitie) wonne them to staywith him all the rest of the day; wherefore, when they had restedthemselves awhile, being attyred in their newly given robes; they rodeon Horsebacke thorow the Citty. When supper time came, they supt inmost honourable and worthy company, beeing afterwards Lodged in mostfaire and sumptuous Chambers, and being risen in the morning, inexchange of their horses (over-wearied with Travaile) they found threeother very richly furnished, and their men also in like mannerprovided. Which when Saladine had perceyved, he tooke his Baschaesaside, and spake in this manner.
3.  A goodly chaire being brought him, in very humble maner hedemanded of her, what had become of her in so long a time, becauseit was verily beleeved throughout all Egypt, that she was drowned inthe Sea. I would it had bin so, answered the Lady, rather then toleade such a life as I have done; and I thinke my Father himselfewould wish it so, if ever he should come to the knowledge thereof.With these words the teares rained downe her faire cheekes:wherefore Antigonus thus spake unto hir. Madam, discomfort not yourselfe before you have occasion; but (if you be so pleased) relate yourpassed accidents to me, and what the course of your life hath bene:perhaps, I shall give you such friendly advice as may stand youinsted, and no way be injurious to you.
4.  SUBJECT: BUT EVERY ONE REMAINETH AT LIBERTY, TO
5.  When he had visited many Christian Provinces, and was ridingthorow Lombardle, to passe the mountaines; it fortuned, in hisjourneying from Millaine to Pavia, and the day being very farre spent,so that night hastened speedily on him: he met with a Gentleman, namedSignior Thorella d'Istria, but dwelling at Pavia, who with his men,Hawkes and Hounds, went to a house of his, seated in a singular place,and on the River of Ticinum. Signior Thorello seeing such men makingtowardes him, presently imagined, that they were someGentle-strangers, and such hee desired to respect with honor.
6.  So long she held on in this mourning manner, that, what by thecontinuall watering of the Basile, and putrifaction of the head, soburied in the pot of earth; it grew very flourishing, and mostodorifferous to such as scented it, that as no other Basile couldpossibly yeeld so sweete a savour. The neighbours noting thisbehaviour in her, observing the long continuance thereof, how much herbright beauty was defaced, and the eyes sunke into her head byincessant weeping, made many kinde and friendly motions, to understandthe reason of her so violent oppressions; but could not by anymeanes prevaile with her, or win any discovery by her Nurse, sofaithfull was she in secrecie to her. Her brethren also waxed wearieof this carriage in her; and having very often reproved her for it,without any other alteration in her: at length, they closely stoleaway the potte of Basile from her, for which she made infinitewofull lamentations, earnestly entreating to have it restoredagaine, avouching that she could not live without it.

推荐功能

1.  The Novell of Madame Eliza being finished, and some-what commendedby the King, in regard of the Tragicall conclusion; Philomena wasenjoyned to proceede next with her discourse. She being overcomewith much compassion, for the hard Fortunes of Noble Gerbino, andhis beautifull Princesse, after an extreame and vehement sighe, thusshe spake. My Tale (worthy Ladies) extendeth not to persons of so highbirth or quality, as they were of whom Madame Eliza gave you relation:yet (peradventure) it may prove to be no lesse pittifull. And now Iremember my selfe, Messina so lately spoken of, is the place wherethis accident also happened.
2.  Then calling for the glasse of water, which she had readily preparedthe day before, and powring it upon the heart lying in the Cup,couragiously advancing it to her mouth, she dranke it up every drop;which being done, she lay downe upon her bed, holding her Lovers heartfast in her hand, and laying it so neere to her owne as she could. Nowalthough her women knew not what water it was, yet when they had seeneher to quaffe it off in that manner, they sent word to the King, whomuch suspecting what had happened, went in all haste to hisDaughters Chamber, entring at the very instant, when she was laideupon her bed; beholding her in such passionate pangs, with tearesstreaming downe his reverend beard, he used many kinde words tocomfort her: when boldly thus she spake unto him. Father (quoth she)well may you spare these teares, because they are unfitting for you,and not any way desired by me; who but your selfe, hath seene anyman to mourne for his owne wilfull offence. Neverthelesse, if butthe least jot of that love do yet abide in you, whereof you havemade such liberall profession to me; let me obtaine this my verylast request, to wit, that seeing I might not privately enjoy thebenefit of Guiscardoes love, and while he lived, let yet (in death)one publike grave containe both our bodies, that death may affoord us,what you so cruelly in life denied us.
3.  John and she being gone to bed together, and the Maide likewise,it was not long after, before Frederigo came, and knocking once softlyat the doore, which was very neere to their lodging Chamber, Johnheard the noise, and so did his wife. But to the end, that Johnmight not have the least scruple of suspition, she seemed to be fastasleepe; and Frederigo pausing a while, according to the orderdirected, knockt againe the second time. John wondering thereat verymuch, jogd his wife a litle, and saide to her: Tessa, hearest thounothing? Methinkes one knocketh at our doore. Monna Tessa, who wasbetter acquainted with the knocke, then plaine honest meaning Johnwas, dissembling as if shee awaked out of a drowsie dreame, saide:Alas Husband, dost thou know what this is? In the name of ourblessed Ladie, be not affraid, this is but the Spirit which haunts ourCountrey houses, whereof I have often told thee, and it hath manytimes much dismayed me, living heere alone without thy comfort. Nay,such hath bin my feare, that in divers nights past, so soone as Iheard the knockes: I was feigne to hide my selfe in the beddeover-head and eares (as we usually say) never daring to be so bold, asto looke out, untill it was broad open day. Arise good wife (quothJohn) and if it be such a Spirit of the Countrey, as thou talkestof, never be affraid; for before we went to bed, I said the Telucis,the Intemerata, with many other good prayers beside. Moreover, Imade the signe of the Crosse at every corner of our bed, in the nameof the Father, Son, and holy Ghost, so that no doubt at all needs tobe made, of any power it can have to hurt or touch us.
4.  Soone after, Calandrino started up, and perceiving by their loudespeaking, that they talked of nothing which required secretCounsell: he went into their company (the onely thing which Masodesired) and holding on still the former Argument; Calandrino wouldneeds request to know, in what place these precious stones were tobe found, which had such excellent vertues in them? Maso made answere,that the most of them were to be had in Berlinzona, neere to theCity of Bascha, which was in the Territory of a Countrey, calledBengodi, where the Vines were bound about with Sawcidges, a Goosewas sold for a penny, and the Goslings freely given in to boote. Therewas also an high mountaine wholly made of Parmezane, grated Cheese,whereon dwelt people, who did nothing else but make Mocharones andRavivolies, boyling them with broth of Capons, and afterward hurledthem all about, to whosoever can or will catch them. Neere to thismountaine runneth a faire River, the whole streame being pure whiteBastard, none such was ever sold for any money, and without one dropof water in it.
5.   No sooner did Constance behold him, but she was ready to dye withconceite of joy, and being unable to containe her passion: sodainelyshe threw her armes about his necke, and in meere compassion of hermany misfortunes, as also the instant solace of her soule (not beingable to utter one word) the teares trickled abundantly downe hercheekes. Martuccio also seeing his faire friend, was overcome withexceeding admiration, and stood awhile, as not knowing what to say;till venting forth a vehement sighe, thus he spake. My deerest loveConstance! Art thou yet living? It is a tedious long while since Iheard thou wast lost, and never any tydings knowne of thee in thineowne Fathers house. With which words, the teares standing in his eyes,most lovingly he embraced her, Constance recounted to him all herfortunes, and what kindnesse she had receyved from the SarazineLady, since her first houre of comming to her. And after much otherdiscourse passing betweene them, Martuccio departed from her, andreturning to the King his master, tolde him all the history of hisfortunes, and those beside of his Love Constance, being purposelyminded (with his gracious liking) to marry her according to theChristian Law.
6.  In this manner lived and died Master Chappelet du Prat, who beforehe became a Saint, was as you have heard: and I will not deny it to beimpossible, but that he may bee at rest among other blessed bodies.For although he lived lewdly and wickedly, yet such might be hiscontrition in the latest extreamity, that (questionlesse) he mightfinde mercie. But, because such things remaine unknowne to us, andspeaking by outward appearance, vulgar judgement will censureotherwise of him, and thinke him to be rather in perdition, then in soblessed a place as Paradice. But referring that to the Omnipotentsappointment, whose clemencie hath alwayes beene so great to us, thathe regards not our errors, but the integrity of our Faith, making(by meanes of our continuall Mediator) of an open enemy, a convertedsonne and servant. And as I began in his name, so will I conclude,desiring that it may evermore be had in due reverence, and referrewe our selves thereto in all our necessities, with this setledassurance, that he is alwayes ready to heare us. And so he ceased.

应用

1.  After their conference was ended, Massetto began to beate hisbraines how he might compasse to dwell among them, and knowing that hecould wel enough performe all the labours whereof Lurco had mademention, he cared not for any losse he should sustaine thereby, butonely stood in doubt of his entertainment, because he was too yong andsprightly. Having pondered on many imaginations, he said tohimselfe. The place is farre enough distant hence, and none therecan take knowledge of mee; if I have wit sufficient, cleanely tomake them beleeve that I am dumbe, then (questionles) I shal bereceived. And resolving to prosecute this determination, he tooke aSpade on his shoulder, and without revealing to any body whether heewent, in the disguise of a poore labouring Countryman, he travelled tothe Monastery.
2.  LOVE IS: YET A MAGNANIMOUS AND TRULY GENEROUS HEART, IT CAN
3.  Let me tell you holy Sir, that such behaviours doe many times laybad imputations upon very honest women, yet without any offence inthem. It hath often run in my mind, to let him have knowledgethereof my min by my brethren: but afterward I considered, that men(many times) deliver messages in such sort, as draw on very ungentleanswers, whereon grow words, and words beget actions. In which regard,because no harme or scandall should ensue, I thought it best to besilent; determining, to acquaint you rather therewith, then to anyother, as wel because you seem to be his friend, as also in regardof your office, which priviledgeth you to correct such abuses, notonely in friends, but also in strangers. Enow other women there are,(more is the pitty) who perhaps are better disposed to such suitesthen I am, and can both like and allow of such courting, otherwisethen I can doe; as being willing to embrace such offers, and (happily)loath to yeeld deniall. Wherefore, most humbly I entreate you goodFather (even for our blessed Ladies sake) that you would give him afriendly reprehension, and advise him to use such unmanly meanes nomore heereafter. With which words, she hung downe her bead in herbosome, cunningly dissembling, as if shee wept, wiping her eyes withher Handkerchife, when not a teare fel from them, but indeed weredry enough.
4、  Lovely Companions, although that Madam Pampinea, more in her ownecourtesie, then any matter of merit remaining in me, hath made me yourQueene: I am not determined, to alter the forme of our intendedlife, nor to be guided by mine owne judgement, but to associate thesame with your assistance. And because you may know what I intend todo, and so (consequently) adde or diminish at your pleasure; in veryfew words, you shall plainly understand my meaning. If you have wellconsidered on the course, which this day hath bene kept by MadamPampinea, me thinkes it hath bene very pleasing and commendable; inwhich regard, untill by over-tedious continuation, or otheroccasions of irkesome offence, it shall seeme injurious, I am of theminde, not to alter it. Holding on the order then as we have begunto doe, we will depart from hence to recreate our selves a while,and when the Sun groweth towards setting, we will sup in the fresh andopen ayre; afterward, with Canzonets and other pastimes, we willout-weare the houres till bed time. To morrow morning, in the freshand gentle breath thereof, we will rise and walke to such places, asevery one shall finde fittest for them, even as already this day wehave done; untill due time shall summon us hither againe, tocontinue our discoursive Tales, wherein (me thinkes) consisteth bothpleasure and profit, especially by discreete observation.
5、  Upon the hearing of this noise, her Mistris came sodainely intothe Chamber, where being affrighted at so strange an accident, andsuspecting that Ruggiero was dead indeed: she pinched him strongly,and burnt his finger with a candle, yet all was as fruitelesse asbefore. Then sitting downe, she began to consider advisedly with herselfe, how much her honour and reputation would be endangeredhereby, both with her Husband, and in vulgar opinion when thisshould come to publike notice. For (quoth she to her Maide) it isnot thy fond love to this unruly fellow that can sway the censure ofthe monster multitude, in beleeving his accesse hither onely tothee: but my good name, and honest repute, as yet untoucht with thevery least taxation, will be rackt on the tenter of infamousjudgement, and (though never so cleare) branded with generallcondemnation. It is wisedome therefore, that we should make no noisebut (in silence) consider with our selves, how to cleare the houseof this dead body, by some such helpfull and witty device, as whenit shall be found in the morning, his being here may passe withoutsuspition, and the worlds rash opinion no way touch US.

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网友评论(EVgdZI2A19480))

  • 陈女才 08-09

      THE SIXT DAY, THE FOURTH NOVELL

  • 刘晓辉 08-09

      The Novell recited by Pamphilus, was highly pleasing to the company,and much commended by the Ladies: and after it had beene diligentlyobserved among them, the Queene commanded Madam Neiphila (who wasseated neerest to Pamphilus) that, in relating another of hers, sheshould follow on in the pastime thus begun. She being no lessegracious in countenance, then merrily disposed; made answere, thatshee would obey her charge, and began in this manner.

  • 胡劲松 08-09

       THE FOURTH DAY, THE SIXTH NOVELL

  • 何某某 08-09

      If in my friend,

  • 李如胜 08-08

    {  Madame Dianora, hearing her husbands words, wept exceedingly, andavouched, that shee had not deserved any such especiall grace ofhim, and therefore she would rather dye, then doe it. Neverthelesse,it was the wil of her Husband to have it so, and therefore (againsther wil) she gave consent. The next morning, by the breake of day,Dianora arose, and attiring her selfe in her very meanest garments,with two servingmen before her, and a waiting Woman following, shewent to the lodging of Signior Ansaldo, who hearing that Madam Dianorawas come to visite him, greatly mervailed, and being risen, hecalled the Magitian to him, saying. Come go with me, and see whateffect will follow upon thine Art. And being come into her presence,without any base or inordinate appetite, he did her humblereverence, embracing her honestly, and taking her into a goodlyChamber, where a faire fire was readilie prepared, causing her tosit downe by him, he sayde unto her as followeth.

  • 李婷 08-07

      The Monke, though his delight with the Damosell was extraordinary,yet feare and suspition followed upon it; for, in the very height ofall his wantonnesse, he heard a soft treading about the doore. Andprying thorow a small crevice in the same dore, perceived apparantly,that the Abbot himselfe stood listening there, and could not beignorant but that the Maide was with him in the Chamber. As afterpleasure ensueth paine, for the veniall Monke knew well enough (thoughwanton heate would not let him heede it before) that most greevouspunishment must bee inflicted on him, which made him sad beyond allmeasure: Neverthelesse, without disclosing his dismay to the yongMaiden, he began to consider with himselfe on many meanes, wherebyto find out one that might best fit his turne. And suddenlyconceited an apt stratagem, which sorted to such effect as he wouldhave it: whereupon, seeming satisfied for that season, he tolde theDamosell, that (being carefull of her credit) as hee had brought herin unseene of any, so he would free her from thence againe, desiringher to tarrie there (without making any noyse at all) untill such timeas he returned to her.}

  • 王世仁 08-07

      Lisana, feeling the touch of his hand, whom she loved above allthings else in the world, although a bashfull blush mounted up intoher cheekes: yet her heart was seazed with such a rapture of pleasure,that she thought her selfe translated into Paradise, and, so well asshe could, thus she replyed. Great King, by opposing my feeblestrength, against a burden of over-ponderous weight, it became theoccasion of this grievous sickenesse: but I hope that the violencethereof is (almost) already kild, onely by this soveraigne mercy inyou, and doubtlesse it will cause my speedy deliverance. The Kingdid best understand this so well palliated answere of Lisana, which ashe did much commend, in regard of her high adventuring; so he didagaine as greatly condemne Fortune, for not making her more happy inher birth.

  • 龚兵义 08-07

      But leave we this, and returne wee backe to vertuous FryarReynard, who falling again& to his former appetites; became an oftenvisitant of his Gossip Agnesia, and now hee had learned such ablushlesse kinde of boldnesse; that he durst be more instant withher (concerning his privie sute) then ever formerly he had bin, yeaeven to solicite the enjoying of his immodest desires. The goodGentlewoman, seeing her selfe so importunately pursued, and FriarReynard appearing now (perhappes) of sweeter and more delicatecomplexion, the at his entrance into Religion: at a set time of hissecret communing with her; she answered him in as apt tearmes, as theyuse to do, who are not greatly sqeamish, in granting mattersdemanded of them.

  • 小川和久 08-06

       Her Chamber being on the streete side, and somewhat juttying overit, she observed the disposition of her Husband, that every night itwas long before he fell asleepe: but beeing once falne into it, nonoyse whatsoever, could easily wake him. This his solemne and soundsleeping, emboldned her so farre, as to meete with Roberto at thestreete doore, which (while her Husband slept) softly she would opento him, and therein private converse with him.

  • 焦军东 08-04

    {  When the Pilgrim had finished his speeches, the Gentlewoman whohad listned to them very attentively (because all the edged reasonsappeared to be plainly true) became verily perswaded, that all theseafictions had falne on her and her father, for the ingratefull offenceby her committed, and therefore thus is replied. Worthy man, and thefriend to goodnesse, I know undoubtedly, that the words which you havespoken are true, and also I understand by your demonstration, whatmanner of people some of those religious persons are, whomheretofore I have reputed to be Saints, but find them now to be farotherwise. And to speake truly, I perceive the fault to be great andgreevous, wherein I have offended against Theobaldo, and would (if Icould) willingly make amends, even in such manner as you have advised.But how is it possible to be done? Theobaldo being dead, can be [no]more recalled to this life; and therefore, I know not what promise Ishould make, in a matter which is not to bee performed. Whereto thePilgrime without any longer pausing, thus answered.

  • 李彩云 08-04

      "The Lord be praised!" said she; "for now I see that I am moreblessed than thou in that I have not this Devil."

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