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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:饶伟辉 大小:XpJ2R8GC66200KB 下载:9FBKKBtP31434次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:m8d0eeqd84965条
日期:2020-08-09 17:32:35
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林靖东

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "We agreed to do as she had said, and feasted through the livelongday to the going down of the sun, but when the sun had set and it cameon dark, the men laid themselves down to sleep by the stern cablesof the ship. Then Circe took me by the hand and bade me be seated awayfrom the others, while she reclined by my side and asked me allabout our adventures.
2.  Then turning to Antinous he said, "Antinous, you take as much careof my interests as though I were your son. Why should you want tosee this stranger turned out of the house? Heaven forbid; take'something and give it him yourself; I do not grudge it; I bid you takeit. Never mind my mother, nor any of the other servants in thehouse; but I know you will not do what I say, for you are more fond ofeating things yourself than of giving them to other people."
3.  Thus they spoke, for they thought that he had killed Antinous bymistake, and did not perceive that death was hanging over the headof every one of them. But Ulysses glared at them and said:
4.  "He then took the cup and drank. He was so delighted with thetaste of the wine that he begged me for another bowl full. 'Be sokind,' he said, 'as to give me some more, and tell me your name atonce. I want to make you a present that you will be glad to have. Wehave wine even in this country, for our soil grows grapes and thesun ripens them, but this drinks like nectar and ambrosia all in one.'
5.  The suitors were surprised and angry at what had happened, so theywent outside the great wall that ran round the outer court, and held acouncil near the main entrance. Eurymachus, son of Polybus, was thefirst to speak.
6.  "I know, Eurynome," replied Penelope, "that you mean well, but donot try and persuade me to wash and to anoint myself, for heavenrobbed me of all my beauty on the day my husband sailed; nevertheless,tell Autonoe and Hippodamia that I want them. They must be with mewhen I am in the cloister; I am not going among the men alone; itwould not be proper for me to do so."

计划指导

1.  Eumaeus was frightened at the outcry they all raised, so he putthe bow down then and there, but Telemachus shouted out at him fromthe other side of the cloisters, and threatened him saying, "FatherEumaeus, bring the bow on in spite of them, or young as I am I willpelt you with stones back to the country, for I am the better man ofthe two. I wish I was as much stronger than all the other suitors inthe house as I am than you, I would soon send some of them off sickand sorry, for they mean mischief."
2.  On this Ulysses began to move off, and said, "Your looks, my finesir, are better than your breeding; if you were in your own houseyou would not spare a poor man so much as a pinch of salt, forthough you are in another man's, and surrounded with abundance, youcannot find it in you to give him even a piece of bread."
3.  Then Telemachus went out of the court to the place where theAchaeans were meeting in assembly; he had his spear in his hand, andhe was not alone, for his two dogs went with him. But Eurycleacalled the maids and said, "Come, wake up; set about sweeping thecloisters and sprinkling them with water to lay the dust; put thecovers on the seats; wipe down the tables, some of you, with a wetsponge; clean out the mixing-jugs and the cups, and for water from thefountain at once; the suitors will be here directly; they will be hereearly, for it is a feast day."
4.  With these words she flew away like a bird into the air, but she hadgiven Telemachus courage, and had made him think more than everabout his father. He felt the change, wondered at it, and knew thatthe stranger had been a god, so he went straight to where thesuitors were sitting.
5.  "Goddess," replied Ulysses, "do not be angry with me about this. Iam quite aware that my wife Penelope is nothing like so tall or sobeautiful as yourself. She is only a woman, whereas you are animmortal. Nevertheless, I want to get home, and can think of nothingelse. If some god wrecks me when I am on the sea, I will bear it andmake the best of it. I have had infinite trouble both by land andsea already, so let this go with the rest."
6.  Telemachus went and knocked at the door of the women's room. "Makehaste," said he, "you old woman who have been set over all the otherwomen in the house. Come outside; my father wishes to speak to you."

推荐功能

1.  With these words he picked up the sword that Agelaus had droppedwhen he was being killed, and which was lying upon the ground. Then hestruck Leiodes on the back of his neck, so that his head fellrolling in the dust while he was yet speaking.
2.  He began with his victory over the Cicons, and how he thence reachedthe fertile land of the Lotus-eaters. He told her all about theCyclops and how he had punished him for having so ruthlessly eaten hisbrave comrades; how he then went on to Aeolus, who received himhospitably and furthered him on his way, but even so he was not toreach home, for to his great grief a hurricane carried him out tosea again; how he went on to the Laestrygonian city Telepylos, wherethe people destroyed all his ships with their crews, save himselfand his own ship only. Then he told of cunning Circe and her craft,and how he sailed to the chill house of Hades, to consult the ghost ofthe Theban prophet Teiresias, and how he saw his old comrades in arms,and his mother who bore him and brought him up when he was a child;how he then heard the wondrous singing of the Sirens, and went on tothe wandering rocks and terrible Charybdis and to Scylla, whom noman had ever yet passed in safety; how his men then ate the cattleof the sun-god, and how Jove therefore struck the ship with histhunderbolts, so that all his men perished together, himself alonebeing left alive; how at last he reached the Ogygian island and thenymph Calypso, who kept him there in a cave, and fed him, and wantedhim to marry her, in which case she intended making him immortal sothat he should never grow old, but she could not persuade him to lether do so; and how after much suffering he had found his way to thePhaeacians, who had treated him as though he had been a god, andsent him back in a ship to his own country after having given himgold, bronze, and raiment in great abundance. This was the lastthing about which he told her, for here a deep sleep took hold uponhim and eased the burden of his sorrows.
3.  "They all swore as I bade them, and when they had completed theiroath we made the ship fast in a harbour that was near a stream offresh water, and the men went ashore and cooked their suppers. As soonas they had had enough to eat and drink, they began talking abouttheir poor comrades whom Scylla had snatched up and eaten; this setthem weeping and they went on crying till they fell off into a soundsleep.
4.  When he was in this plight, Ino daughter of Cadmus, also calledLeucothea, saw him. She had formerly been a mere mortal, but hadbeen since raised to the rank of a marine goddess. Seeing in whatgreat distress Ulysses now was, she had compassion upon him, and,rising like a sea-gull from the waves, took her seat upon the raft.
5.   "The cruel wretch vouchsafed me not one word of answer, but with asudden clutch he gripped up two of my men at once and dashed them downupon the ground as though they had been puppies. Their brains wereshed upon the ground, and the earth was wet with their blood. Thenhe tore them limb from limb and supped upon them. He gobbled them uplike a lion in the wilderness, flesh, bones, marrow, and entrails,without leaving anything uneaten. As for us, we wept and lifted up ourhands to heaven on seeing such a horrid sight, for we did not knowwhat else to do; but when the Cyclops had filled his huge paunch,and had washed down his meal of human flesh with a drink of neat milk,he stretched himself full length upon the ground among his sheep,and went to sleep. I was at first inclined to seize my sword, draw it,and drive it into his vitals, but I reflected that if I did weshould all certainly be lost, for we should never be able to shift thestone which the monster had put in front of the door. So we stayedsobbing and sighing where we were till morning came.
6.  On this he gave his orders to the servants, who got the waggonout, harnessed the mules, and put them to, while the girl broughtthe clothes down from the linen room and placed them on the waggon.Her mother prepared her a basket of provisions with all sorts ofgood things, and a goat skin full of wine; the girl now got into thewaggon, and her mother gave her also a golden cruse of oil, that sheand her women might anoint themselves. Then she took the whip andreins and lashed the mules on, whereon they set off, and their hoofsclattered on the road. They pulled without flagging, and carried notonly Nausicaa and her wash of clothes, but the maids also who werewith her.

应用

1.  "I spoke comfortingly to them and said, 'We must draw our ship on tothe land, and hide the ship's gear with all our property in some cave;then come with me all of you as fast as you can to Circe's house,where you will find your comrades eating and drinking in the midstof great abundance.'
2.  "May Jove so grant it," replied Telemachus; "if it should prove tobe so, I will make vows to you as though you were a god, even when Iam at home."
3.  "'This,' I answered, 'must be as it may please heaven, but tell meand tell me and tell me true, I see my poor mother's ghost close byus; she is sitting by the blood without saying a word, and though I amher own son she does not remember me and speak to me; tell me, Sir,how I can make her know me.'
4、  On this the gods gathered to the house of Vulcan. Earth-encirclingNeptune came, and Mercury the bringer of luck, and King Apollo, butthe goddesses stayed at home all of them for shame. Then the givers ofall good things stood in the doorway, and the blessed gods roared withinextinguishable laughter, as they saw how cunning Vulcan had been,whereon one would turn towards his neighbour saying:
5、  "On this he lifted up his hands to the firmament of heaven andprayed, saying, 'Hear me, great Neptune; if I am indeed your owntrue-begotten son, grant that Ulysses may never reach his homealive; or if he must get back to his friends at last, let him do solate and in sore plight after losing all his men [let him reach hishome in another man's ship and find trouble in his house.']

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  • 黄飞掌 08-08

      When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, Menelausrose and dressed himself. He bound his sandals on to his comelyfeet, girded his sword about his shoulders, and left his roomlooking like an immortal god. Then, taking a seat near Telemachus hesaid:

  • 李万堂 08-08

      On this the goatherd Melanthius went by back passages to the storeroom of Ulysses, house. There he chose twelve shields, with as manyhelmets and spears, and brought them back as fast as he could togive them to the suitors. Ulysses' heart began to fail him when he sawthe suitors putting on their armour and brandishing their spears. Hesaw the greatness of the danger, and said to Telemachus, "Some oneof the women inside is helping the suitors against us, or it may beMelanthius."

  • 何鸿燊 08-08

       Pontonous mixed the wine and handed it to every one in turn; theothers each from his own seat made a drink-offering to the blessedgods that live in heaven, but Ulysses rose and placed the double cupin the hands of queen Arete.

  • 卢钟灿 08-08

      Eumaeus answered, "Old man, no traveller who comes here with newswill get Ulysses' wife and son to believe his story. Nevertheless,tramps in want of a lodging keep coming with their mouths full oflies, and not a word of truth; every one who finds his way to Ithacagoes to my mistress and tells her falsehoods, whereon she takes themin, makes much of them, and asks them all manner of questions,crying all the time as women will when they have lost theirhusbands. And you too, old man, for a shirt and a cloak woulddoubtless make up a very pretty story. But the wolves and birds ofprey have long since torn Ulysses to pieces, or the fishes of thesea have eaten him, and his bones are lying buried deep in sand uponsome foreign shore; he is dead and gone, and a bad business it isfor all his friends- for me especially; go where I may I shall neverfind so good a master, not even if I were to go home to my motherand father where I was bred and born. I do not so much care,however, about my parents now, though I should dearly like to see themagain in my own country; it is the loss of Ulysses that grieves memost; I cannot speak of him without reverence though he is here nolonger, for he was very fond of me, and took such care of me thatwhereever he may be I shall always honour his memory."

  • 王国维 08-07

    {  Thus did they converse, but King Apollo said to Mercury,"Messenger Mercury, giver of good things, you would not care howstrong the chains were, would you, if you could sleep with Venus?"

  • 方义宏 08-06

      "Vixen," replied Ulysses, scowling at her, "I will go and tellTelemachus what you have been saying, and he will have you torn limbfrom limb."}

  • 尼旺姆 08-06

      "Those whom you have named," answered Telemachus, "are a couple ofgood allies, for though they dwell high up among the clouds theyhave power over both gods and men."

  • 谢荣琼 08-06

      Then Minerva left Scheria and went away over the sea. She went toMarathon and to the spacious streets of Athens, where she enteredthe abode of Erechtheus; but Ulysses went on to the house of Alcinous,and he pondered much as he paused a while before reaching thethreshold of bronze, for the splendour of the palace was like thatof the sun or moon. The walls on either side were of bronze from endto end, and the cornice was of blue enamel. The doors were gold, andhung on pillars of silver that rose from a floor of bronze, whilethe lintel was silver and the hook of the door was of gold.

  • 尼亚孜 08-05

       With these words he led the way, and the others followed after. Aservant hung Demodocus's lyre on its peg for him, led him out of thecloister, and set him on the same way as that along which all thechief men of the Phaeacians were going to see the sports; a crowd ofseveral thousands of people followed them, and there were manyexcellent competitors for all the prizes. Acroneos, Ocyalus, Elatreus,Nauteus, Prymneus, Anchialus, Eretmeus, Ponteus, Proreus, Thoon,Anabesineus, and Amphialus son of Polyneus son of Tecton. There wasalso Euryalus son of Naubolus, who was like Mars himself, and wasthe best looking man among the Phaecians except Laodamas. Three sonsof Alcinous, Laodamas, Halios, and Clytoneus, competed also.

  • 郭冠英 08-03

    {  The maids looked at one another and laughed, while pretty Melanthobegan to gibe at him contemptuously. She was daughter to Dolius, buthad been brought up by Penelope, who used to give her toys to playwith, and looked after her when she was a child; but in spite of allthis she showed no consideration for the sorrows of her mistress,and used to misconduct herself with Eurymachus, with whom she was inlove.

  • 甘纳斯 08-03

      Calypso knew him at once- for the gods all know each other, nomatter how far they live from one another- but Ulysses was not within;he was on the sea-shore as usual, looking out upon the barren oceanwith tears in his eyes, groaning and breaking his heart for sorrow.Calypso gave Mercury a seat and said: "Why have you come to see me,Mercury- honoured, and ever welcome- for you do not visit me often?Say what you want; I will do it for be you at once if I can, and if itcan be done at all; but come inside, and let me set refreshment beforeyou.

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