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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:陈艳艳 大小:QnUiLRuJ10870KB 下载:m5e1Ao6F30258次
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日期:2020-08-05 10:31:36
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蔡赴朝

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Angelina making little or no account of such a losse, entreated themfor charities sake, to conduct her to that Castle, which accordinglythey did, and arrived there betweene seven and eight of the clock. TheCastle belonged to one of the Orsini, being called, Liello di Campo diFiore, and by great good fortune, his wife was then there, she being avery vertuous and religious Lady. No sooner did she looke uponAngelina, but she knew her immediately, and entertaining her verywillingly, requested, to know the reason of her thus arriving there:which she at large related, and moved the Lady (who likewise knewPedro perfectly well) to much compassion, because he was a kinsman anddeare friend to her Husband; and understanding how the Theeves hadsurprized him, she feared, that he was slaine among them, whereuponshe spake thus to Angelina. Seeing you know not what is become of mykinsman Pedro, you shall remaine here with me, untill such time, as(if we heare no other tidings of him) you may with safety be sentbacke to Rome.
2.  My teares do, etc.
3.  Ruggiero having this benefite of the Maides kinde love to him,made it an hopefull mounting Ladder, whereby to derive some goodliking from the Mistresse, presuming rather on his outward comelyparts, then any other honest qualitie that might commend him. TheMistresse knowing what choise her Maide had made, and unable by anyperswasions to remoove her, tooke knowledge of Ruggieroes privateresorting to her house, and in meere love to her Maide (who had verymany especiall deservings in her) oftentimes she would (in kindemanner) rebuke him, and advise him to a more settled course of life;which counsell, that it might take the better effect; she gracedwith liberall gifts: one while with Golde, others with Silver, andoften with garments, for his comelier accesse thither; which bounty,he (like a lewde mistaker) interpreted as assurances of heraffection to him, and that he was more gracefull in her eye, thenany man else could be.
4.  DOTH YET NEVERTHELESSE RENOWNE A MAN, AND BRING HIM TO FARRE
5.  The precious Stones and jewels found by Landolpho, maketh mee toremember (said Madam Fiammetta, who was next to deliver her discourse)a Tale, containing no lesse perils, then that reported by MadamLauretta: but somewhat different from it, because the one happenedin sundry yeeres, and this other had no longer time, then the compasseof one poore night, as instantly I will relate unto you.
6.  Three pleasant Companions, plaide a merry pranke with a Judge(belonging to the Marquesate of Ancona) at Florence, at such time ashe sate on the Bench, and hearing criminall causes.

计划指导

1.  Indeede you say true Unckle, I am come home verie earely, because,since the day of my birth, I never saw a City so pestered withunhandsome people, both men and women, and worse this high Holyday,then ever I did observe before. I walked thorow some store ofstreetes, and I could not see one proper man: and as for the women,they are the most mishapen and ugly creatures, that, if God had mademe such an one, I should be sory that ever I was borne. And being nolonger able to endure such unpleasing sights; you wil not thinke(Unckle) in what an anger I am come home. Fresco, to whome thesestinking qualities of his Neece seemed so unsufferable, that hee couldnot (with patience) endure them any longer, thus short and quickelyanswered. Francesca, if all people of our Citie (both men and women)be so odious in thy eyes, and offensive to thy nose, as thou hastoften reported to me: bee advised then by my counsell. Stay stil athome, and look upon none but thy selfe onely, and then thou shalt besure that they cannot displease thee. But shee, being as empty ofwit as a pith-lesse Cane, and yet thought her judgement to exceedSalomons, could not understand the lest part of hir Unkles meaning,but stood as senselesse as a sheepe. Onely she replyed, that she wouldresort to some other parts of the country, which if shee found asweakly furnished of handsome people, as heere shee did, shee wouldconceive better of her selfe, then ever she had done before.
2.  It is a commendable thing (faire Ladies) to hit a But that neverstirreth out of his place: but it is a matter much more admirable,to see a thing suddainely appearing, and sildome or never frequentedbefore, to bee as suddenly hit by an ordinary Archer. The viciousand polluted lives of Priests, yeeldeth matter of it selfe in manythings, deserving speech and reprehension, as a true But of wickednes,and well worthy to be sharply shot at. And therefore, though thathonest meaning man did wisely, in touching Master Inquisitor to thequicke, with the hypocriticall charity of Monkes and Friars, in givingsuch things to the poore, as were more meete for Swine, or to be worsethrowne away, yet I hold him more to be commended, who (by occasion ofa former tale, and which I purpose to relate) pleasantly reproovedMaster Can de la Scala, a Magnifico and mighty Lord, for a suddenand unaccustomed covetousnesse appearing in him, figuring by othermen, that which hee intended to say of him, in manner following.
3.  When the Clowne had set his Lady safe on a faire green banke, hereturned to see what the waiting woman ayled, and finding her leg tobe quite broken: he caried her also to the same banke, and thereseated her by her Lady: who perceiving what a mischance had hapned,and she (from whom she expected her onely best helpe) to bee now infar greater necessity her selfe: shee lamented exceedingly,complaining on Fortunes cruel malice toward her, in thus heaping onemisery upon another, and never ceasing to torment her, especiallynow in the conclusion of all, and when shee thought all futureperils to be past.
4.  Mistresse shallow-braine, being swolne big with this wind, like anempty bladder; conceived no small pride in hearing these words,constantly crediting them to be true, and therefore thus answered. DidI not tel you Father Albert, that my beauty was celestiall? But Isweare by my beauty, notwithstanding your idle passed arrogancy, Iam heartily sorry for your so severe correction; which that it mayno more be inflicted on you, I do freely pardon you; yet with thisproviso, that you tell me what the God else saide unto you; wheretoFryar Albert thus replyed. Madam, seeing you have so graciouslyvouchsafed to pardon me, I will thankfully tell you all: but youmust be very carefull and respective, that whatsoever I shallreveale unto you, must so closely be concealed, as no livingcreature in the World may know it; for you are the onely happy Ladynow living, and that happinesse relleth on your silence andsecrecie: with solemne vowes and protestations she sealed up hermany promises, and then the Fryar thus proceeded.
5.  Madam, this idle fellow would maintaine to me, that SigniorSicophanto marrying with Madama della Grazza, had the victory of hervirginity the very first night; and I avouched the contrary, becauseshee had been a mother twise before, in very faire adventuring ofher fortune. And he dared to affirme beside, that yong Maides are sosimple, as to loose the flourishing Aprill of their time, in meerefeare of their parents, and great prejudice of their friends.
6.  It came to passe, that in so great a concourse of people, asresorted thither from all parts; three of our Citizens went toTrevers, one of them being named Stechio, the second Martellino, andthe third Marquiso, all being men of such condition, as frequentedPrinces Courts, to give them delight by pleasant and counterfettedqualities. None of these men having ever beene at Trevers before,seeing how the people crowded thorow the streetes, wondered greatlythereat: but when they knew the reason why the throngs ranne on heapesin such sort together, they grew as desirous to see the Shrine, as anyof the rest. Having ordered all affaires at their lodging, Marquisosaide; It is fit for us to see this Saint, but I know not how we shallattaine thereto, because (as I have heard) the place is guarded byGermaine Souldiers, and other warlike men, commanded thither by theGovernour of this City, least any outrage should be there committed:And beside, the Church is so full of people, as we shall nevercompasse to get neere. Martellino being also as forward in desire tosee it, presently replied. All this difficulty cannot dismay me, but Iwill go to the very body of the Saint it selfe. But how? quothMarquiso. I will tell thee, answered Martellino. I purpose to go inthe disguise of an impotent lame person, supported on the one sideby thy selfe, and on the other by Stechio, as if I were not able towalke of my selfe: And you two thus sustaining me, desiring to comeneere the Saint to cure me; every one will make way, and freely giveyou leave to go on.

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1.  For none would heare or pittie my complaints;
2.  He delighted (beyond measure) and addicted his best studies, tocause enmities and scandals betweene kindred and friends, or any otherpersons, agreeing well together; and the more mischiefe he couldprocure in this kind, so much the more pleasure and delight tooke hetherein. If he were called to kill any one, or to do any othervillanous deede, he never would make deniall, but go to it verywillingly; and divers times it was well knowen, that many were cruellybeaten, ye slaine by his hands. Hee was a most horrible blasphemerof God and his Saints, upon the very least occasion, as being moreaddicted to choller, then any other man could be. Never would hefrequent the Church, but basely contemned it, with the Sacramentsand religious rites therein administred, accounting them for vileand unprofitable things: but very voluntarily would visit Tavernes,and other places of dishonest accesse, which were continually pleasingunto him, to satisfie his lust and inordinate lubricitie. Hee wouldsteale both in publike and private, even with such a conscience, as ifit were given to him by nature so to do. He was a great glutton anda drunkarde, even he was not able to take any more: being also acontinuall gamester, and carrier of false Dice, to cheate with themthe very best Friends he had.
3.  Now was Arriguccio ten times more mad in his minde, then before,saying. Divell, and no woman, did wee not this night goe both togetherto bed? Did not I cut this thred from thy great toe, tyed it tomine, and found the craftie compact betweene thee and thy Minnion? Didnot I follow and fight with him in the streets? Came I not backeagaine, and beate thee as a Strumpet should be? And are not thesethe locks of haire, which I my selfe did cut from thy bead?
4.  After some other questions, how this intention of theirs might beesafely brought to full effect: the sprightly Nun that had wit at will,thus answered. You see Sister (quoth she) it is now the houre ofmidday, when all the rest of our sisterhood are quiet in theirChambers, because we are then allowed to sleep, for our earlier risingto morning Mattins. Here are none in the Garden now but our selves,and while I awake him, bee you the watch, and afterward follow meein my fortune, for I will valiantly leade you the way. Massettoimmitating a Dogges sleepe, heard all this conspiracie intendedagainst him, and longed as earnestly till shee came to awake him.Which being done, he seeming very simple and sottish, and she chearinghim with flattering behaviour: into the close Arbour they went,which the Sunnes bright eye could not pierce into, and there I leaveit to the Nunnes owne approbation, whether Massetto was a manrationall, or no. Ill deeds require longer time to contrive, then act;and both the Nuns having bene with Massetto at this new forme ofconfession, were enjoyned (by him) such an easie and silent penance,as brought them the oftner to shrift, and made him to proove a veryperfect Confessour.
5.   The Marquesse of Montferrat was a worthy and valiant Knight, whobeing Captaine Generall for the Church, the necessary service requiredhis company on the Seas, in a goodly Army of the Christians againstthe Turkes. Upon a day, in the Court of King Philip, sirnamed theone eyed King (who likewise made preparation in France, for a royallassistance to that expedition) as many speeches were delivered,concerning the valour and manhoode of this Marquesse: it fortuned,that a Knight was then present, who knew him very familiarly, and hegave an addition to the former commendation, that the whole worldcontained not a more equall couple in marriage, then the Marquesse andhis Lady. For, as among all knights, the Marquesse could hardly beparaleld for Armes and Honour; even so his wife, in comparison ofall other Ladies, was scarcely matchable for beauty and vertue.Which words were so weighty in the apprehension of King Philip, thatsodainly (having as yet never seen her) he began to affect her veryearnestly, concluding to embarke himselfe at Gennes or Genoua, thereto set forward on the intended voyage, and journying thither byland, hee would shape some honest excuse to see the Lady Marquesse,whose Lord being then from home, opinion perswaded him over fondly,that he should easily obtaine the issue of his amorous desire.
6.  She being thus happily bestowne, he minded to tarry no longer inLondon; but, in his wonted begging manner, travailing thorough theCountry with his sonne Perotto, at length he came into Wales: butnot without much weary paine and travell, being never used before,to journey so far on foot. There dwelt another Lord, in office ofMarshalship to the King of England, whose power extended over thoseparts: a man of very great authority, keeping a most noble andbountifull house, which they termed the President of Wales hisCourt; whereto the Count and his Son oftentimes resorted, as findingthere good releefe and comfort. On a day, one of the Presidentssons, accompanied with divers other Gentlemens children, wereperforming certaine youthfull sports, and pastimes, as running,leaping, and such like, wherein Perotto presumed to make one amongthem, excelling all the rest in such commendable manner, as none ofthem came any thing nere him. Divers times the President had takennotice thereof, and was so well pleased with the Lads behaviour,that he enquired of whence he was? Answere was made, that he was apoore mans Son, that every day came for an almes to his gate.

应用

1.  I see, I heare, and feele a kinde of blisse,
2.  And joy, in thy captivitie:
3.  Master Can de la Scala, as fame ranne abroad of him in all places,was (beyond the infinite favours of Fortune towards him) one of themost notable and magnificent Lords that ever lived in Italy, since thedaies of Fredericke the second, Emperor. He determining to procure avery solemne assembly at Verona, and many people being met therefrom divers places, especially Gentlemen of all degrees; suddenly(upon what occasion I know not) his minde altred, and hee would notgoe forward with his intention. Most of them he partly recompencedwhich were come thither, and they dismissed to depart at theirpleasure, one onely man remained unrespected, or in any kinde sortsent away, whose name was Bergamino, a man very pleasantly disposed,and so wittily readie in speaking and answering, as none couldeasily credit it, but such as heard him; and although his recompenceseemed over-long delayed, yet hee made no doubt of a beneficiallending.
4、  When Ferandoes senses were recovered againe, and he found himselfeto be in such a darkesome place; not knowing where he was, hebeganne to crie and make a noyse. When presently the Monke ofBologna (according as the Abbot had tutored him) stept into thedungeon, carrying a little waxe candle in the one hand, and a smartingwhip in the other, going to Ferando, he stript off his cloathes, andbegan to lash him very soundly. Ferando roaring and crying, couldsay nothing else, but where am I? The Monke (with a dreadfull voyce)replyed: Thou art in Purgatory. How? saide Ferando; what? Am I dead?Thou art dead (quoth the Monke) and began to lash him lustilyagaine. Poore Ferando, crying out for his Wife and little Sonne,demanded a number of idle questions, whereto the Monke still fittedhim with as fantasticke answers. Within a while after, he set bothfoode and wine before him, which when Ferando saw, he saide; How isthis? Doe dead men eate and drinke? Yes, replyed the Monke, and thisfoode which here thou seest, thy Wife brought hither to the Churchthis morning, to have Masses devoutly sung for thy soule, and as toother, so must it be set before thee, for such is the command of thePatrone of this place.
5、  According as his intention aymed, so he longed to put it inexecution, and having imparted his mind to an honest loyall friend,named Adriano, who was acquainted with the course of his love:hyring two horses, and having Portmantues behind them, filled withmatters of no moment, they departed from Florence, as if they had somegreat journey to ride. Having spent the day time where themselves bestpleased, darke night being entred, they arrived on the plaine ofMugnone, where, as if they were come from the parts of Romanio, theyrode directly to this poore Inne, and knocking at the doore, thehonest Hoste (being familiar and friendly to all commers) opened thedoore, when Panuccio spake in this manner to him. Good man, we mustrequest one nights lodging with you, for we thought to have reached sofarre as Florence, but dark night preventing us, you see at what alate houre wee are come hither. Signior Panuccio, answered thehoste, it is not unknowne to you, how unfiting my poore house is,for entertaining such guests as you are: Neverthelesse, seeing you areovertaken by so unseasonable an houre, and no other place is neere foryour receite; I will gladly lodge you so well as I can.

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网友评论(Aw9b3CpV67348))

  • 特斯拉 08-04

      Had lesse heart-greeving,

  • 金建琳 08-04

      Sending presently abroad, and buying all the Hennes that the Countryaffoorded, shee commaunded her Cookes, that onely of them (without anyother provision beside) they should prepare all the services that theycould devise. On the morrow, the King came according to his promise,and was most honourably welcomed by the Lady, who seemed in his eye(far beyond the Knights speeches of her) the fairest creature thatever he had seene before; whereat he mervailed not a little, extollingher perfections to be peerelesse, which much the more enflamed hisaffections, and (almost) made his desires impatient. The King beeingwithdrawne into such Chambers, as orderly were prepared for him, andas beseemed so great a Prince: the houre of dinner drawing on, theKing and the Lady Marquesse were seated at one Table, and hisattendants placed at other tables, answerable to their degrees ofhonour.

  • 威尔莫茨 08-04

       Recovering the further side of the River, he espied a light, and thedoore of an house open, wherein dwelt a poore man, whom he earnestlyintreated, to save both his life and reputation, telling him many liesand tales by what meanes he was thus disguised, and throwne bynight-walking Villaines into the water. The poore man, being movedto compassionate his distressed estate, laid him in his owne bed,ministring such other comforts to him, as the time and his poverty didpermit; and day drawing on, he went about his businesse, advisinghim to take his rest, and it should not be long till he returned.So, locking the doore, and leaving the counterfet God in bed, awaygoes the poore man to his daily labor. The Brethren to Lisetta,perceiving God Cupid to be fied and gone, and she in melanchollysadnesse sitting by them: they tooke up the Reliques he had leftbehind him, I meane the Friars hood and Cowle, which shewing totheir sister, and sharpely reproving her unwomanly behaviour: theyleft her in no meane discomfort, returning home to their ownehouses, with their conquered spolle of the forlorne Friar.

  • 李大娘 08-04

      Within some few dayes after, the Potestate pursuing his formermotion of mariage, and the father mooving it to his daughter, shewould not by any meanes listen thereto. And he being desirous togive her contentment, delivered her and her Chamber-maid into aReligious Abbey, very famous for devotion and sanctity, whereafterwards they ended their lives.

  • 杨绍林 08-03

    {  Adriano, is it day, that thou dost waken me? It may be day ornight replyed Adriano, for both (in these fits) are alike to thee.Arise man for shame, and come to thine lodging. Then faining to bemuch troubled and sleepie, he arose from the hoast, and went toAdrianoes bed.

  • 牛犁 08-02

      Signiour Thorello, with a number of his honourable Friends (to thenumber of an hundred Horsse) accompanied them a great distance fromthe Citie, and although it greeved Saladine exceedingly, to leavethe company of Thorello, so dearely he was affected to him: butnecessity (which controlleth the power of all lawes whatsoever) mustneeds divide them: yet requesting his returne agayne that way, ifpossibly it might be granted; which Saladine promised but did notperforme. Well Gentlemen (quoth Thorello at parting) I know not whatyou are, neither (against your will) do I desire it: but whether yoube Marchants or no remember me in your kindnesse, and so to theheavenly powers I commend you. Saladine, having taken his leave of allthem that were with Thorello, returned him this answer. Sir, it mayone day hereafter so happen, as we shal let you see some of ourMarchandises, for the better confirmation of your beleefe, and ourprofession.}

  • 尹汤云 08-02

      Opinion hath made it famous for long time, that the Seacoast ofRhegium to Gaieta, is the onely delactable part of all Italy, wherein,somewhat neere to Salerno, is a shore looking upon the Sea, whichthe inhabitants there dwelling, doe call the coast of Malfy, full ofsmall Townes, Gardens, Springs, and wealthy men, trading in as manykindes of Merchandizes, as any other people that I know. Among whichTownes, there is one, named Ravello, wherein (as yet to this day thereare rich people) there was (not long since) a very wealthy man,named Landolpho Ruffolo, who being not contented with his riches,but coveting to multiply them double and trebble, fell in danger, toloose both himselfe and wealth together. This man (as otherMerchants are wont to doe) after hee had considered on his affaires,bought him a very goodly Ship, lading it with divers sorts ofMerchandizes, all belonging to himselfe onely, and making his voyageto the Isle of Cyprus. Where he found, over and beside theMerchandizes he had brought thither, many Ships more there arrived,and all laden with the same commodities, in regard whereof, it wasneedefull for him, not onely to make a good Mart of his goods; butalso was further constrained (if hee meant to vent his commodities) tosell them away (almost) for nothing, endangering his utter destructionand overthrow. Whereupon, grieving exceedingly at so great a losse,not knowing what to doe, and seeing, that from very aboundantwealth, hee was likely to fall into as low poverty: he resolved todie, or to recompence his losses upon others, because he would notreturne home poore, having departed thence so rich.

  • 许开踟 08-02

      It appeareth to me, that thou art verie desirous to come downehither on the ground; the best counsell that I can give thee, is toleape downe headlong, that by breaking thy necke (if thy fortune be sofaire) thy life and lothsome qualities ending together, I may sitand smile at thy deserved destruction. I have no other comfort to givethee, but only to boast my happinesse, in teaching thee the way toascend that Tower, and in thy descending downe (even by what means thywit can best devise) make a mockery of me, and say thou hast learnedmore, then all my Schollership could instruct thee.

  • 刘丽发 08-01

       THE NINTH DAY, THE EIGHT NOVELL

  • 李泽民 07-30

    {  Lovely Companions, although that Madam Pampinea, more in her ownecourtesie, then any matter of merit remaining in me, hath made me yourQueene: I am not determined, to alter the forme of our intendedlife, nor to be guided by mine owne judgement, but to associate thesame with your assistance. And because you may know what I intend todo, and so (consequently) adde or diminish at your pleasure; in veryfew words, you shall plainly understand my meaning. If you have wellconsidered on the course, which this day hath bene kept by MadamPampinea, me thinkes it hath bene very pleasing and commendable; inwhich regard, untill by over-tedious continuation, or otheroccasions of irkesome offence, it shall seeme injurious, I am of theminde, not to alter it. Holding on the order then as we have begunto doe, we will depart from hence to recreate our selves a while,and when the Sun groweth towards setting, we will sup in the fresh andopen ayre; afterward, with Canzonets and other pastimes, we willout-weare the houres till bed time. To morrow morning, in the freshand gentle breath thereof, we will rise and walke to such places, asevery one shall finde fittest for them, even as already this day wehave done; untill due time shall summon us hither againe, tocontinue our discoursive Tales, wherein (me thinkes) consisteth bothpleasure and profit, especially by discreete observation.

  • 史明德 07-30

      What say you now Ladies? Shal wee make any account of the womanwel-neere dead, and the kindnesse growne cold in Signiour Gentile,by losse of his former hopes, comparing them with the liberality ofSignior Ansaldo, affecting more fervently, then ever the other did?And being (beyond hope) possessed of the booty, which (above allthings else in the world) he most desired to have, to part with itmeerly in fond compassion? I protest (in my judgement) the one is noway comparable to the other; that of Geitile, with this last ofSignior Ansaldo.

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