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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:萧然 大小:ntzRoxD643829KB 下载:au1jJACM61550次
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日期:2020-08-07 13:05:24
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  You are to understand then, that it is no long while since, whenthere dwelt in Paris a Florentine Gentleman, who falling into decay ofhis estate, by over-bountifull expences; undertooke the degree of aMerchant, and thrived so well by his trading, that he grew to greatwealth, having one onely sonne by his wife, named Lodovico. ThisSonne, partaking somewhat in his Fathers former height of minde, andno way inclineable to deale in Merchandize, had no meaning to be aShopman, and therefore accompanied the Gentlemen of France, insundry services for the King; among whom, by his singular goodcarriage and qualites, he happened to be not meanly esteemed. Whilethus he continued in the Court, it chanced, that certaine Knights,returning from Jerusalem, having there visited the holy Sepulcher, andcomming into company where Lodovico was: much familiar discoursepassed amongst them, concerning the faire women of France, England,and other parts of the world where they had bin, and what delicatebeauties they had seene.
2.  Let me (quoth he) admit the case, that none of these surmises areintended, but her Kinsman (by and in this manner devised) must bringme into her house: I am not therefore perswaded, that he or they docovet, to have the body of Scannadio, either to carry it thither, orpresent it to her, but rather do aime at some other end. May not Iconjecture, that my close murthering is purposed, and this wayacted, as on him that (in his life time) had offended them? The Maidhath straitly charged me, that whatsoever is said or done unto me, Iam not to speake a word. What if they pul out mine eies, teare outmy teeth, cut off my hands, or do me any other mischiefe: Where am Ithen? Shall all these extremities barre me of speaking? On the otherside, if I speake, then I shall be knowne, and so much the sooner(perhaps) be abused. But admit that I sustaine no injurie at all, asbeing guilty of no transgression: yet (perchance) I shall not becarried to her house, but to some other baser place, and afterward sheshall reprove me, that I did not accomplish what shee commanded, andso all my labour is utterly lost.
3.  When night was come, they buried him in a goodly Marble tombe,erected in a faire Chappell purposely; and for many dayes afterfollowing, it was most strange to see, how the people of the Countrycame thither on heapes, with holy Candles and other offerings, withImages of waxe fastened to the Tombe, in signe of Sacred and solemneVowes, to this new created Saint. And so farre was spread the fame andrenowne of his sanctity, devotion, and integrity of life, maintainedconstantly by the Fathers of the Convent; that if any one fell sickein neede, distresse, or adversity, they would make their Vowes to noother Saint but him: naming him (as yet to this day they do) SaintChappelet, affirming upon their Oathes, that infinite miracles werethere daily performed by him, and especially on such, as came indevotion to visit his shrine.
4.  I doe accept it (Worthy Ladies) as no mean favour, that the Kinghath given me the first place, to speake of such an honourableArgument, as Bounty and Magnificence is, which precious Jewell, evenas the Sunne is the beauty, or ornament and bright glory of al heaven;so is bounty and magnificence the Crowne of all vertues. I shallthen recount to you a short Novell, sufficiently pleasing, in mineowne opinion, and I hope (so much I dare rely on your judgements) bothprofitable, and worthy to be remembred.
5.  Lesca, not a jot danted at his stearne words, presently she saide.Pyrrhus, Both in this and all other Messages my Lady shall command me,I wil speake to thee whensoever shee pleaseth, receive what discontentthou canst thereby; or make presumption of what doubts thou maistdevise. But as I found thee a senselesse fellow, dull, and notshaped to any understanding, so I leave thee: And in that anger partedfrom him, carrying backe the same answer to her Lady. She no soonerheard it, but instantly shee wished her selfe to be dead; and withinsome few dayes after, she conferred againe with her Chamber-woman,saying. Lesca, thou knowest well enough, that the Oxe falleth not atthe first blow of the Axel neither is the victory won, upon a sillyand shallow adventure: Wherefore, I thinke it convenient, that oncemore thou shouldst make another tryall of him, who (in prejudice tome) standeth so strictly on his loyalty, and choosing such an houre asseemeth most commodious, soundly possesse him with my tormentingpassions. Bestirre thy Wittes, and tippe thy tongue with a Womanseloquence, to effect what I so earnestly desire: because, bylanguishing in this lovesicke affliction, it will bee the danger of mydeath, and some severe detriment to him, to be the occasion of sogreat a losse.
6.  What Lawes, what threatnings, what feares, could cause the yongarmes of Gisippus to abstaine embraces, betaking himselfe tosolitary walkes, and obscure places, when in his owne bedde, hemight have enjoyed so matchlesse a beauty (who perhaps desired it somuch as himselfe) but onely the gracious title of Amity? Whatgreatnesse, what merits or precedence, could cause Gisippus not tocare, for the losse of his kindred, those of Sophronia, yea, ofSophronia her selfe, not respecting the dishonest murmurings of baseminded people, their vile and contemptible language, scornes andmockeries, and all to content and satisfie a friend, but onelyDivine Amity?

计划指导

1.  After some indifferent respite of time, it chanced that the youngDamosel (who was named Iphigenia) awaked before any of the otherwith her, and lifted up her head, with her eyes wide open, she sawChynon standing before her, leaning still on his staffe; whereatmarvailing not a little, she saide unto him: Chynon, whither wanderestthou, or what dost thou seeke for in this wood? Chynon, who notonely by his countenance but likewise his folly, Nobility of birth,and wealthy possessions of his father, was generally knowne throughoutthe Countrey, made no answere at all to the demand of Iphigenia: butso soone as he beheld her eyes open, he began to observe them with aconstant regard, and being perswaded in his soule, that from themflowed such an unutterable singularity, as he had never felt tillthen. Which the young Gentlewoman well noting, she began to waxfearefull, least these stedfast lookes of his, should incite hisrusticity to some attempt, which might redound to her dishonour:wherefore awaking her women and servants, and they all being risen,she saide. Farewell Chynon, I leave thee to thine owne good Fortune;whereto hee presently replyed, saying: I will go with you. Now,although the Gentlewoman refused his company, as dreading some acte ofincivility from him: yet could she not devise any way to be rid ofhim, till he had brought her to her owne dwelling, where takingleave mannerly of her, he went directly home to his Fathers house,saying: Nothing should compell him to live any longer in the muddyCountry. And albeit his Father was much offended hereat, and all therest of his kindred and friends: (yet not knowing how to helpe it)they suffered him to continue there still, expecting the cause of thishis so sodaine alteration, from the course of life, which contentedhim so highly before.
2.  Rossiglione leaving his Lady, went into the Kitchin, where callingfor the Cooke, he delivered him the heart, saying: Take this heartof a wilde Boare, which it was my good happe to kill this day, anddresse it in the daintiest manner thou canst devise to do; which beingso done, when I am set at the Table, send it to me in a silver dish,with sauce beseeming so dainty a morsell. The Cooke tooke the heart,beleeving it to be no otherwise, then as his Lord had saide: and usinghis utmost skill in dressing it, did divide it into artificiallsmall slices, and made it most pleasing to be tasted. When supper timewas come, Rossiglione sate downe at the table with his Lady: but hehad little or no appetite at all to eate, the wicked deed which he haddone so perplexed his soule, and made him to sit very strangelymusing. At length, the Cooke brought in the dainty dish, which hehimselfe setting before his wife, began to finde fault with his ownelacke of stomacke, yet provoked her with many faire speeches, totast the Cooks cunning in so rare a dish.
3.  But, as we see it oftentimes come to passe, that by how much thelower hope declineth, so much the higher love ascendeth; even sofell it out with this poore Querry; for, most irkesome was it tohim, to endure the heavy waight of his continuall oppressions, nothaving any hope at all of the very least mitigation. And being utterlyunable to relinquish his love divers times he resolved on somedesperate conclusion, which might yet give the world an evidenttestimony, that he dyed for the love he bare to the Queene. And uponthis determination, hee grounded the successe of his future fortune,to dye in compassing some part of his desire, without eitherspeaking to the Queene, or sending any missive of his love; for tospeake or write, were meerely in vaine, and drew on a worserconsequence then death, which he could bestow on himselfe more easily,and when he listed.
4.  Late in the dead time of the night, the Abbot himselfe entred intothe darke dungeon, and in an hollow counterfeited voyce, called toFerando, saying. Comfort thy selfe Ferando, for the Fates are nowpleased, that thou shalt bee released out of Purgatory, and sent tolive in the world againe. Thou didst leave thy wife newly conceivedwith childe, and this very morning she is delivered of a goodly Sonne,whom thou shalt cause to be named Bennet: because, by the incessantprayers of the holy Abbot, thine owne loving Wife, and for sweet SaintBennets sake, this grace and favour is afforded thee. Ferandohearing this, was exceeding joyfull, and returned this answere: Forever honored be the Fates, the holy Lord Abbot, blessed SaintBennet, and my most dearely beloved Wife, whom I will faithfullylove for ever, and never more offend her by any jealous in me.
5.  At the length, the invited guests being all gone, the Lady retyredthen to her chamber, attended on by none but Bajazeth himselfe, and asfamiliarly as if he had bene one of her women, shee no waycontradicting his bold intrusion, so farre had wine over-gone hersences, and prevailed against all modest bashfulnesse. These wantonembracings, strange to her that had never tasted them before, yetpleasing beyond measure, by reason of his treacherous advantage;afterward drew on many more of the ike carowsing meetings, withoutso much as thought of her passed miseries, or those more honourableand chaste respects, that ever ought to attend on Ladies.
6.  Ricciardo Manardy, was found by Messer Lizio da Valbonna, as he satefast asleepe at his Daughters Chamber window, having his hand fastin hers, and she sleeping in the same manner. Whereupon, they arejoyned together in marriage, and their long loyall love mutuallyrecompenced.

推荐功能

1.  In the meane while, Gulfardo having determined what he would do,watched a convenient time, when he went unto Gasparuolo, and sayde:Sir, I have some businesse of maine importance, and shall neede to usebut two hundred Crownes onely: I desire you to lend me so manyCrownes, upon such profite as you were wont to take of mee, at othertimes when I have made use of you, and I shall not faile you at myday.
2.  At his departing from him, hee went directly to the Signoria, andprevailed so far that he spake privately with a Knight, who was thenone of the States chiefest Lords, to whom he saide. Sir, a man oughtto bestow his best paines and diligence, that the truth of thingsshould be apparantly knowne, especially, such men as hold the placeand office as you doe: to the end, that those persons which havecommitted no foule offence, should not bee punished, but onely theguilty and haynous transgressors. And because it will be no meanehonor to you, to lay the blame where it worthily deserveth, I amcome hither purposely, to informe you in a case of most weightyimportance. It is not unknowne to you, with what rigour the State hathproceeded against Aldobrandino Palermini, and you think verily he isthe man that hath slaine Theobaldo Elisei, whereupon your Law hathcondemned him to die. I dare assure you Sir, that a very unjust coursehath beene taken in this case, because Aldobrandino is falslyaccused as you your selfe will confesse before midnight, when they aredelivered into your power, that were the murderers of the man.
3.  ADDICTED TO CREDULITIE, AND WILL GIVE CREDIT TO EVERY
4.  Now Bruno plainly perceiving (within a short while of this new begunacquaintance) that the Physitian was a Loggerhead, and meerely nobetter then a Gregorian Animall: he beganne to have much goodpastime with him, by telling him strange and incredible Tales, such asnone but a Coxcombe would give credit too; yet they delighted DoctorDunce extraordinarily, and Brunoes familiarity was so highlypleasing to him, that he was a daily guest at dinner and supper withhim, and hee was not meanly proud of enjoying his company. One day, asthey sate in familiar conference together, he told Bruno that hewondred not a little at him and Buffalmaco, they being both so poorepeople, yet lived far more jovially then Lords, and thereforedesired to understand, by what secret meanes they compassed suchmirthful maintenance. Bruno, hearing the Doctors demaund, andperceiving that it savoured more of the foole, then any the very leasttaste of wisedome: smiled unto himselfe, and determined to returne himsuch an answere, as might be fitting for his folly, whereupon, thus hereplied.
5.   Peronella hid a yong man her friend and Lover, under a great brewingFat, upon the sodaine returning home of her Husband; who told her,that hee had solde the saide Fat and brought him that bought it, tocary it away. Peronella replyed, that shee had formerly solde itunto another, who was now underneath it, to see whether it werewhole and sound, or no. Whereupon, he being come forth from underit; she caused her Husband to make it neate and cleane, and so thelast buyer carried it away.
6.  This strange and uncouth sight, bred in him no meane admiration,as also kinde compassion to the unfortunate woman; out of whichcompassion, sprung an earnest desire, to deliver her (if he could)from a death so full of anguish and horror: but seeing himselfe tobe without Armes, he ran and pluckt up the plant of a Tree, whichhandling as if it had bene a staffe, he opposed himselfe against theDogges and the Knight, who seeing him comming, cryed out in thismanner to him. Anastasio, put not thy selfe in any opposition, butreferre to my Hounds and me, to punish this wicked woman as she hathjustly deserved. And in speaking these words, the Hounds tooke fasthold on her body, so staying her, untill the Knight was come neerer toher, and alighted from his horse: when Anastasio (after some otherangry speeches) spake thus unto him: I cannot tell what or who thouart, albeit thou takest such knowledge of me, yet I must say, thatit is meere cowardize in a Knight, being armed as thou art, to offerto kill a naked woman, and make thy dogges thus to seize on her, as ifshe were a savage beast; therefore beleeve me, I will defend her sofarre as I am able.

应用

1.  Andrea de Piero, travelling from Perouse to Naples to buy Horses,was (in the space of one night) surprised by three admirableaccidents, out of all which he fortunately escaped, and with a richRing, returned home to his owne house.
2.  Already had the bright Sunne renewed the day every where with hissplendant beames, and the Birds sate merrily singing on the bloomingbranches, yeelding testimony thereof to the eares of all hearers; whenthe seven Ladies, and the three Gentlemen (after they were risen)entered the Gardens, and there spent some time in walking, as alsomaking of Nose-gayes and Chaplets of Flowers. And even as they haddone the day before, so did they now follow the same course; for,after they had dined, in a coole and pleasing aire they fell todancing, and then went to sleepe a while, from which being awaked,they tooke their places (according as it pleased the Queene toappoint) in the same faire Meadow about her. And she, being a goodlycreature, and highly pleasing to behold, having put on her Crowne ofLawrell, and giving a gracious countenance to the whole company;commanded Madam Neiphila that her Tale should begin this daiesdelight. Whereupon she, without returning any excuse or deniall, beganin this manner.
3.  It came to passe at this time concerning my Tale, that the Womanbeing somewhat crazie and sickly, by her Husbands unkinde usage,whereof you heard so lately; Calandrino went alone to the killing ofhis Boare, which comming to the hearing of Bruno and Buffalmaco andthat the Woman could by no meanes be there: to passe away the time alittle in merriment, they went to a friendlie Companion of theirs,an honest joviall Priest, dwelling not farre off from CalandrinoesCountrey house.
4、  The woman understanding, what good and honest welcome, Gossip Johnafforded her husband, when he came to Barletta, was often very willingto goe lodge with an honest neighbour of hers, called Carapresa diGludice Leo, because the two Gossips might both lie together in onebed; wherewith divers times she acquainted her Husband, but by nomeanes he would admit it.
5、  Poore soule, why live I then?

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  • 吴南翔 08-06

      SUNG IN THE HEARING OF KING PIERO, ON THE

  • 摩尔玛 08-06

      An honest man, named Fresco da Celatico, had a good fulsom wenchto his Neece, who for her folly and squemishnes, was generallycalled Cesta, or nice Francesca. And althogh she had staturesufficient, yet none of the handsomest, and a good hard favourdcountenance, nothing nere such Angelical beauties as we have seen; yetshe was endued with such height of minde, and so proud an opinion ofher selfe, that it appeared as a custome bred in hir, or rather a giftbestowed on hir by nature (thogh none of the best) to blame anddespise both men and women, yea whosoever she lookt on; without anyconsideration of her self, she being as unsightly, ill shaped, andugly faced, as a worse was very hardly to be found.

  • 兰博 08-06

       Now, for their securer meeting, to stand cleare from all matter ofscandal or detection, they concluded in this order between themselves.Lazaro, for so was Peronellaes Husband named, being an earely riserevery morning, either to seeke for worke, or to effect it beingundertaken: this amorous friend being therewith acquainted, andstanding in some such convenient place, where hee could see Lazaroesdeparture from his house, and yet himselfe no way discerned; pooreLazaro was no sooner gone, but presently he enters the house, whichstood in a verie solitarie street, called the Avorio. Many morningshad they thus met together, to their no meane delight andcontentation, till one especial morning among the rest, when Lazarowas gone forth to worke, and Striguario (so was the amorous youngman named) visiting Peronella in the house: upon a verie urgentoccasion, Lazaro returned backe againe, quite contrary to his formerwont, keeping foorth all day, and never comming home till night.

  • 班苓 08-06

      When the Abbot heard this, hee was ten times worse affrighted thenbefore, because (by publique fame) hee had beene so many monethsdead and buried; but receiving (by true arguments) better assurance ofhim, and hearing him still call him by his name: blessing himselfewith the signe of the Crosse, hee went somewhat neerer to the bed,when Thorello said. My loving Uncle, and religious holy Father, wherofare you afraid? I am your loving Nephew, newly returned from beyondthe Seas. The Abbot, seeing his beard to be grown long, and hishabit after the Arabian fashion, did yet collect some resemblance ofhis former countenance; and being better perswaded of him, tooke himby the hand, saying:

  • 孙红军 08-05

    {  Thorello arising out of the bedde, gave gracious salutations tothe Abbot and his Monkes, intreating earnestly of them all, that noword might be spoken of his returne, untill he had compleated animportant businesse. Afterward, having safely secured the bedde, andall the rich Jewells, he fully acquainted the Abbot with all hispassed fortunes, whereof he was immeasurably joyfull, and havingsatisfied him, concerning the new elected husband, Thorello saidunto the Abbot. Unckle, before any rumour of my returne, I wouldgladly see my wives behavior at this new briding feast, and althoughmen of religion are seldome seene at such joviall meetings: yet (formy sake) doe you so order the matter, that I (as an Arabianstranger) may be a guest under your protection; wherto the Abbotvery gladly condescended.

  • 魏葳 08-04

      But he well considering what she was, the greatnes of his injury, asalso how, and for whom: he forgot all wanton allurements of Love,scorning to entertaine a thought of compassion, continuing constant inhis resolution, to let her suffer, as he himselfe had done. So, Helenabeing mounted up on the Turret, and turning her face towards theNorth; she repeated those idle frivolous words (composed in the natureof a charme) which shee had received from the Scholler. Afterward,by soft and stealing steps, hee went into the old Tower, and tookeaway the Ladder, whereby she ascended to the Tarras, staying andlistening, how shee proceeded in her amorous exorcisme.}

  • 马文 08-04

      Having brought with him thither three goodly rich garments, whichhad beene given him by sundrie Lords, for his more sightlyappearance at this great meeting; the importunate Host being greedieof payment, first he delivered him one of them, and yet not halfethe score being wiped off, the second must needes follow; andbeside, except he meant to leave his lodging, hee must live upon thethird so long as it would last, till hee saw what end his hopeswould sort too. It fortuned, during the time of living thus upon hislast refuge, that hee met with Maister Can one day at dinner, where hepresented himselfe before him, with a discontented countenance:which Maister Can well observing, more to distaste him, then takedelight in any thing that could come from him, he sayd. Bergamino, howcheerest thou? Thou art very melancholly, I prythee tell us why?Bergamino suddenly, without any premeditation, yet seeming as if hehad long considered thereon, reported this Tale.

  • 黄小青 08-04

      OF HIMSELFE, AND HIS TRUE HONOUR

  • 林啸 08-03

       On the day following, which was towards the ending of the monethof May, Catharina began to complaine to her Mother that the season wasover-hot and tedious, to be still lodged in her Mothers Chamber,because it was an hinderance to her sleeping; and wanting rest, itwould be an empairing of her health. Why Daughter (quoth the Mother)the weather (as yet) is not so hot, but (in my minde) you may verywell endure it. Alas Mother, saide she, aged people, as you and myFather are, do not feele the heates of youthfull blood, by reason ofyour farre colder complexion, which is not to be measured by youngeryeeres. I know that well Daughter, replyed the Mother; but is it in mypower, to make the weather warme or coole, as thou perhaps wouldsthave it? Seasons are to be suffered, according to their severallqualities; and though the last night might seeme hot, this nextensuing may be cooler, and then thy rest will be the better. NoMother, quoth Catharina, that cannot be; for as Summer proceedethon, so the heate encreaseth, and no expectation can be of temperateweather, untill it groweth to Winter againe. Why Daughter, saide theMother, what wouldest thou have me to do? Mother (quoth she) if itmight stand with my Fathers good liking and yours, I would be sparedfrom the Garden Gallery, which is a great deale more coole lodged.There shall I heare the sweete Nightingale sing, as every night sheuseth to do, and many other pretty Birdes beside, which I cannot dolodging in your Chamber.

  • 袁水河 08-01

    {  The servant departing from her with the child, and reporting theMarquesse what his Lady had said; he wondered at her incomparableconstancy. Then he sent it by the same servant to Bologna, to anhonourable Lady his kinsewoman, requesting her (without revealingwhose child it was) to see it both nobly and carefully educated.

  • 克里斯托弗 08-01

      Now trust me Sir, (said Calandrino) that is an excellent Countrey todwell in: but I pray you tell me Sir, what do they with the Caponsafter they have boyld them? The Baschanes (quoth Maso) eate themall. Have you Sir, said Calandrino, at any time beene in thatCountrey? How? answered Maso, doe you demaund if have beene there? Yesman, above a thousand times, at the least. How farre Sir, I pray you(quoth Calandrino) is that worthy Countrey, from this our City? Introth, replyed Maso, the miles are hardly to be numbred, for themost part of them, we travell when we are nightly in our beddes, andif a man dreame right; he may be there upon a sudden.

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