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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:尉伟 大小:E3cwP9Z768714KB 下载:kkWXZLHA66603次
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日期:2020-08-05 11:18:21
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "I wish it may prove so," answered Telemachus. "If it does, I willshow you so much good will and give you so many presents that allwho meet you will congratulate you."
2.  "I know, Eurynome," replied Penelope, "that you mean well, but donot try and persuade me to wash and to anoint myself, for heavenrobbed me of all my beauty on the day my husband sailed; nevertheless,tell Autonoe and Hippodamia that I want them. They must be with mewhen I am in the cloister; I am not going among the men alone; itwould not be proper for me to do so."
3.  "Eumaeus, what a noble hound that is over yonder on the manure heap:his build is splendid; is he as fine a fellow as he looks, or is heonly one of those dogs that come begging about a table, and are keptmerely for show?"
4.  "Happy Ulysses, son of Laertes," replied the ghost of Agamemnon,"you are indeed blessed in the possession of a wife endowed withsuch rare excellence of understanding, and so faithful to her weddedlord as Penelope the daughter of Icarius. The fame, therefore, ofher virtue shall never die, and the immortals shall compose a songthat shall be welcome to all mankind in honour of the constancy ofPenelope. How far otherwise was the wickedness of the daughter ofTyndareus who killed her lawful husband; her song shall be hatefulamong men, for she has brought disgrace on all womankind even on thegood ones."
5.  Thus did they converse. Meanwhile the suitors were hatching a plotto murder Telemachus: but a bird flew near them on their left hand- aneagle with a dove in its talons. On this Amphinomus said, "My friends,this plot of ours to murder Telemachus will not succeed; let us goto dinner instead."
6.  "Thence we sailed onward with sorrow in our hearts, but glad to haveescaped death though we had lost our comrades, nor did we leave tillwe had thrice invoked each one of the poor fellows who had perished bythe hands of the Cicons. Then Jove raised the North wind against ustill it blew a hurricane, so that land and sky were hidden in thickclouds, and night sprang forth out of the heavens. We let the shipsrun before the gale, but the force of the wind tore our sails totatters, so we took them down for fear of shipwreck, and rowed ourhardest towards the land. There we lay two days and two nightssuffering much alike from toil and distress of mind, but on themorning of the third day we again raised our masts, set sail, and tookour places, letting the wind and steersmen direct our ship. I shouldhave got home at that time unharmed had not the North wind and thecurrents been against me as I was doubling Cape Malea, and set meoff my course hard by the island of Cythera.

计划指导

1.  Now the night came on stormy and very dark, for there was no moon.It poured without ceasing, and the wind blew strong from the West,which is a wet quarter, so Ulysses thought he would see whetherEumaeus, in the excellent care he took of him, would take off hisown cloak and give it him, or make one of his men give him one."Listen to me," said he, "Eumaeus and the rest of you; when I havesaid a prayer I will tell you something. It is the wine that makesme talk in this way; wine will make even a wise man fall to singing;it will make him chuckle and dance and say many a word that he hadbetter leave unspoken; still, as I have begun, I will go on. Wouldthat I were still young and strong as when we got up an ambuscadebefore Troy. Menelaus and Ulysses were the leaders, but I was incommand also, for the other two would have it so. When we had comeup to the wall of the city we crouched down beneath our armour and laythere under cover of the reeds and thick brush-wood that grew aboutthe swamp. It came on to freeze with a North wind blowing; the snowfell small and fine like hoar frost, and our shields were coated thickwith rime. The others had all got cloaks and shirts, and sleptcomfortably enough with their shields about their shoulders, but I hadcarelessly left my cloak behind me, not thinking that I should betoo cold, and had gone off in nothing but my shirt and shield. Whenthe night was two-thirds through and the stars had shifted their theirplaces, I nudged Ulysses who was close to me with my elbow, and heat once gave me his ear.
2.  "Very well," replied Telemachus, "go home when you have had yourdinner, and in the morning come here with the victims we are tosacrifice for the day. Leave the rest to heaven and me."
3.  His father shed tears and answered, "Sir, you have indeed come tothe country that you have named, but it is fallen into the hands ofwicked people. All this wealth of presents has been given to nopurpose. If you could have found your friend here alive in Ithaca,he would have entertained you hospitably and would have requiredyour presents amply when you left him- as would have been only rightconsidering what you have already given him. But tell me, and tellme true, how many years is it since you entertained this guest- myunhappy son, as ever was? Alas! He has perished far from his owncountry; the fishes of the sea have eaten him, or he has fallen a preyto the birds and wild beasts of some continent. Neither his mother,nor I his father, who were his parents, could throw our arms about himand wrap him in his shroud, nor could his excellent and richly doweredwife Penelope bewail her husband as was natural upon his death bed,and close his eyes according to the offices due to the departed. Butnow, tell me truly for I want to know. Who and whence are you- tell meof your town and parents? Where is the ship lying that has brought youand your men to Ithaca? Or were you a passenger on some other man'sship, and those who brought you here have gone on their way and leftyou?"
4.  Telemachus answered, "I can expect nothing of the kind; it wouldbe far too much to hope for. I dare not let myself think of it. Eventhough the gods themselves willed it no such good fortune could befallme."
5.  Then Ulysses answered, "Madam, wife of Ulysses, do not disfigureyourself further by grieving thus bitterly for your loss, though I canhardly blame you for doing so. A woman who has loved her husband andborne him children, would naturally be grieved at losing him, eventhough he were a worse man than Ulysses, who they say was like agod. Still, cease your tears and listen to what I can tell I will hidenothing from you, and can say with perfect truth that I have latelyheard of Ulysses as being alive and on his way home; he is among theThesprotians, and is bringing back much valuable treasure that hehas begged from one and another of them; but his ship and all his crewwere lost as they were leaving the Thrinacian island, for Jove and thesun-god were angry with him because his men had slaughtered thesun-god's cattle, and they were all drowned to a man. But Ulyssesstuck to the keel of the ship and was drifted on to the land of thePhaecians, who are near of kin to the immortals, and who treated himas though he had been a god, giving him many presents, and wishingto escort him home safe and sound. In fact Ulysses would have beenhere long ago, had he not thought better to go from land to landgathering wealth; for there is no man living who is so wily as heis; there is no one can compare with him. Pheidon king of theThesprotians told me all this, and he swore to me- makingdrink-offerings in his house as he did so- that the ship was by thewater side and the crew found who would take Ulysses to his owncountry. He sent me off first, for there happened to be aThesprotian ship sailing for the wheat-growing island of Dulichium,but he showed me all treasure Ulysses had got together, and he hadenough lying in the house of king Pheidon to keep his family for tengenerations; but the king said Ulysses had gone to Dodona that hemight learn Jove's mind from the high oak tree, and know whether afterso long an absence he should return to Ithaca openly or in secret.So you may know he is safe and will be here shortly; he is close athand and cannot remain away from home much longer; nevertheless I willconfirm my words with an oath, and call Jove who is the first andmightiest of all gods to witness, as also that hearth of Ulysses towhich I have now come, that all I have spoken shall surely come topass. Ulysses will return in this self same year; with the end of thismoon and the beginning of the next he will be here."
6.  THEN Mercury of Cyllene summoned the ghosts of the suitors, and inhis hand he held the fair golden wand with which he seals men's eyesin sleep or wakes them just as he pleases; with this he roused theghosts and led them, while they followed whining and gibberingbehind him. As bats fly squealing in the hollow of some great cave,when one of them has fallen out of the cluster in which they hang,even so did the ghosts whine and squeal as Mercury the healer ofsorrow led them down into the dark abode of death. When they hadpassed the waters of Oceanus and the rock Leucas, they came to thegates of the sun and the land of dreams, whereon they reached themeadow of asphodel where dwell the souls and shadows of them thatcan labour no more.

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1.  "Stranger," said he, "how suddenly you have changed from what youwere a moment or two ago. You are dressed differently and yourcolour is not the same. Are you some one or other of the gods thatlive in heaven? If so, be propitious to me till I can make you duesacrifice and offerings of wrought gold. Have mercy upon me."
2.  Medon caught these words of Telemachus, for he was crouching under aseat beneath which he had hidden by covering himself up with a freshlyflayed heifer's hide, so he threw off the hide, went up to Telemachus,and laid hold of his knees.
3.  "Nine days and nine nights did we sail, and on the tenth day ournative land showed on the horizon. We got so close in that we couldsee the stubble fires burning, and I, being then dead beat, fellinto a light sleep, for I had never let the rudder out of my ownhands, that we might get home the faster. On this the men fell totalking among themselves, and said I was bringing back gold and silverin the sack that Aeolus had given me. 'Bless my heart,' would one turnto his neighbour, saying, 'how this man gets honoured and makesfriends to whatever city or country he may go. See what fine prizes heis taking home from Troy, while we, who have travelled just as faras he has, come back with hands as empty as we set out with- and nowAeolus has given him ever so much more. Quick- let us see what itall is, and how much gold and silver there is in the sack he gavehim.'
4.  When the pair had thus laid their plans they parted, and the goddesswent straight to Lacedaemon to fetch Telemachus.
5.   "On this he lifted up his hands to the firmament of heaven andprayed, saying, 'Hear me, great Neptune; if I am indeed your owntrue-begotten son, grant that Ulysses may never reach his homealive; or if he must get back to his friends at last, let him do solate and in sore plight after losing all his men [let him reach hishome in another man's ship and find trouble in his house.']
6.  Thus did they converse. Meanwhile Eurynome and the nurse tooktorches and made the bed ready with soft coverlets; as soon as theyhad laid them, the nurse went back into the house to go to her rest,leaving the bed chamber woman Eurynome to show Ulysses and Penelope tobed by torch light. When she had conducted them to their room she wentback, and they then came joyfully to the rites of their own old bed.Telemachus, Philoetius, and the swineherd now left off dancing, andmade the women leave off also. They then laid themselves down to sleepin the cloisters.

应用

1.  Ulysses hailed this as of good omen, and Antinous set a great goat'spaunch before him filled with blood and fat. Amphinomus took twoloaves out of the bread-basket and brought them to him, pledging himas he did so in a golden goblet of wine. "Good luck to you," hesaid, "father stranger, you are very badly off at present, but Ihope you will have better times by and by."
2.  "Hush," answered Ulysses, "hold your peace and ask no questions, forthis is the manner of the gods. Get you to your bed, and leave me hereto talk with your mother and the maids. Your mother in her griefwill ask me all sorts of questions."
3.  Nurse Euryclea saw him long before any one else did. She was puttingthe fleeces on to the seats, and she burst out crying as she ran up tohim; all the other maids came up too, and covered his head andshoulders with their kisses. Penelope came out of her room lookinglike Diana or Venus, and wept as she flung her arms about her son. Shekissed his forehead and both his beautiful eyes, "Light of my eyes,"she cried as she spoke fondly to him, "so you are come home again; Imade sure I was never going to see you any more. To think of yourhaving gone off to Pylos without saying anything about it or obtainingmy consent. But come, tell me what you saw."
4、  "Menelaus, son of Atreus, and you my good friends, sons ofhonourable men (which is as Jove wills, for he is the giver both ofgood and evil, and can do what he chooses), feast here as you will,and listen while I tell you a tale in season. I cannot indeed nameevery single one of the exploits of Ulysses, but I can say what he didwhen he was before Troy, and you Achaeans were in all sorts ofdifficulties. He covered himself with wounds and bruises, dressedhimself all in rags, and entered the enemy's city looking like amenial or a beggar. and quite different from what he did when he wasamong his own people. In this disguise he entered the city of Troy,and no one said anything to him. I alone recognized him and began toquestion him, but he was too cunning for me. When, however, I hadwashed and anointed him and had given him clothes, and after I hadsworn a solemn oath not to betray him to the Trojans till he had gotsafely back to his own camp and to the ships, he told me all thatthe Achaeans meant to do. He killed many Trojans and got muchinformation before he reached the Argive camp, for all which thingsthe Trojan women made lamentation, but for my own part I was glad, formy heart was beginning to oam after my home, and I was unhappy aboutwrong that Venus had done me in taking me over there, away from mycountry, my girl, and my lawful wedded husband, who is indeed by nomeans deficient either in person or understanding."
5、  "My mother answered, 'Your wife still remains in your house, but sheis in great distress of mind and spends her whole time in tears bothnight and day. No one as yet has got possession of your fine property,and Telemachus still holds your lands undisturbed. He has to entertainlargely, as of course he must, considering his position as amagistrate, and how every one invites him; your father remains athis old place in the country and never goes near the town. He has nocomfortable bed nor bedding; in the winter he sleeps on the floor infront of the fire with the men and goes about all in rags, but insummer, when the warm weather comes on again, he lies out in thevineyard on a bed of vine leaves thrown anyhow upon the ground. Hegrieves continually about your never having come home, and suffersmore and more as he grows older. As for my own end it was in thiswise: heaven did not take me swiftly and painlessly in my own house,nor was I attacked by any illness such as those that generally wearpeople out and kill them, but my longing to know what you were doingand the force of my affection for you- this it was that was thedeath of me.'

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  • 张永恒 08-04

      "I will tell you then truth," replied her son. "We went to Pylos andsaw Nestor, who took me to his house and treated me as hospitably asthough I were a son of his own who had just returned after a longabsence; so also did his sons; but he said he had not heard a wordfrom any human being about Ulysses, whether he was alive or dead. Hesent me, therefore, with a chariot and horses to Menelaus. There I sawHelen, for whose sake so many, both Argives and Trojans, were inheaven's wisdom doomed to suffer. Menelaus asked me what it was thathad brought me to Lacedaemon, and I told him the whole truth,whereon he said, 'So, then, these cowards would usurp a brave man'sbed? A hind might as well lay her new-born young in the lair of alion, and then go off to feed in the forest or in some grassy dell.The lion, when he comes back to his lair, will make short work withthe pair of them, and so will Ulysses with these suitors. By fatherJove, Minerva, and Apollo, if Ulysses is still the man that he waswhen he wrestled with Philomeleides in Lesbos, and threw him soheavily that all the Greeks cheered him- if he is still such, and wereto come near these suitors, they would have a short shrift and a sorrywedding. As regards your question, however, I will not prevaricate nordeceive you, but what the old man of the sea told me, so much will Itell you in full. He said he could see Ulysses on an islandsorrowing bitterly in the house of the nymph Calypso, who waskeeping him prisoner, and he could not reach his home, for he had noships nor sailors to take him over the sea.' This was what Menelaustold me, and when I had heard his story I came away; the gods thengave me a fair wind and soon brought me safe home again."

  • 塞班 08-04

      On this they rose and went to the water side. The crew then drew theship on shore; their servants took their armour from them, and theywent up in a body to the place of assembly, but they would not let anyone old or young sit along with them, and Antinous, son ofEupeithes, spoke first.

  • 王星威 08-04

       "King Alcinous, you said your people were the nimblest dancers inthe world, and indeed they have proved themselves to be so. I wasastonished as I saw them."

  • 刘总 08-04

      "It was day-break by the time she had done speaking, so shedressed me in my shirt and cloak. As for herself she threw a beautifullight gossamer fabric over her shoulders, fastening it with a goldengirdle round her waist, and she covered her head with a mantle. Then Iwent about among the men everywhere all over the house, and spokekindly to each of them man by man: 'You must not lie sleeping here anylonger,' said I to them, 'we must be going, for Circe has told meall about it.' And this they did as I bade them.

  • 张怡宁 08-03

    {  There, then, they left him in very cruel bondage, and having puton their armour they closed the door behind them and went back to taketheir places by the side of Ulysses; whereon the four men stood in thecloister, fierce and full of fury; nevertheless, those who were in thebody of the court were still both brave and many. Then Jove's daughterMinerva came up to them, having assumed the voice and form ofMentor. Ulysses was glad when he saw her and said, "Mentor, lend meyour help, and forget not your old comrade, nor the many good turns hehas done you. Besides, you are my age-mate."

  • 毛福梅 08-02

      "We waited the whole morning and made the best of it, watching theseals come up in hundreds to bask upon the sea shore, till at noon theold man of the sea came up too, and when he had found his fat seals hewent over them and counted them. We were among the first he counted,and he never suspected any guile, but laid himself down to sleep assoon as he had done counting. Then we rushed upon him with a shout andseized him; on which he began at once with his old tricks, and changedhimself first into a lion with a great mane; then all of a sudden hebecame a dragon, a leopard, a wild boar; the next moment he wasrunning water, and then again directly he was a tree, but we stuckto him and never lost hold, till at last the cunning old creaturebecame distressed, and said, Which of the gods was it, Son ofAtreus, that hatched this plot with you for snaring me and seizingme against my will? What do you want?'}

  • 阿巴拉契亚山 08-02

      And Ulysses answered, "Nurse, you ought not to speak in that way;I am well able to form my own opinion about one and all of them;hold your tongue and leave everything to heaven."

  • 布莱恩-克兰斯顿 08-02

      Minerva answered, "Stranger, you must be very simple, or must havecome from somewhere a long way off, not to know what country thisis. It is a very celebrated place, and everybody knows it East andWest. It is rugged and not a good driving country, but it is by nomeans a bid island for what there is of it. It grows any quantity ofcorn and also wine, for it is watered both by rain and dew; itbreeds cattle also and goats; all kinds of timber grow here, and thereare watering places where the water never runs dry; so, sir, thename of Ithaca is known even as far as Troy, which I understand tobe a long way off from this Achaean country."

  • 胡祖波 08-01

       Then it vanished through the thong-hole of the door and wasdissipated into thin air; but Penelope rose from her sleep refreshedand comforted, so vivid had been her dream.

  • 雷定明 07-30

    {  And Minerva answered, "I will tell you truly and particularly allabout it. I am Mentes, son of Anchialus, and I am King of theTaphians. I have come here with my ship and crew, on a voyage to menof a foreign tongue being bound for Temesa with a cargo of iron, and Ishall bring back copper. As for my ship, it lies over yonder off theopen country away from the town, in the harbour Rheithron under thewooded mountain Neritum. Our fathers were friends before us, as oldLaertes will tell you, if you will go and ask him. They say,however, that he never comes to town now, and lives by himself inthe country, faring hardly, with an old woman to look after him andget his dinner for him, when he comes in tired from pottering abouthis vineyard. They told me your father was at home again, and that waswhy I came, but it seems the gods are still keeping him back, for heis not dead yet not on the mainland. It is more likely he is on somesea-girt island in mid ocean, or a prisoner among savages who aredetaining him against his will I am no prophet, and know very littleabout omens, but I speak as it is borne in upon me from heaven, andassure you that he will not be away much longer; for he is a man ofsuch resource that even though he were in chains of iron he would findsome means of getting home again. But tell me, and tell me true, canUlysses really have such a fine looking fellow for a son? You areindeed wonderfully like him about the head and eyes, for we were closefriends before he set sail for Troy where the flower of all theArgives went also. Since that time we have never either of us seen theother."

  • 韦永成 07-30

      With these words he took Theoclymenus to his own house. When theygot there they laid their cloaks on the benches and seats, went intothe baths, and washed themselves. When the maids had washed andanointed them, and had given them cloaks and shirts, they took theirseats at table. A maid servant then brought them water in abeautiful golden ewer, and poured it into a silver basin for them towash their hands; and she drew a clean table beside them. An upperservant brought them bread and offered them many good things of whatthere was in the house. Opposite them sat Penelope, reclining on acouch by one of the bearing-posts of the cloister, and spinning.Then they laid their hands on the good things that were before them,and as soon as they had had enough to eat and drink Penelope said:

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