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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:乔治·罗德里格斯 大小:ZnuWPEv990565KB 下载:ZcOZJrP496032次
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日期:2020-08-05 07:52:37
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Now trust me Sir, (said Calandrino) that is an excellent Countrey todwell in: but I pray you tell me Sir, what do they with the Caponsafter they have boyld them? The Baschanes (quoth Maso) eate themall. Have you Sir, said Calandrino, at any time beene in thatCountrey? How? answered Maso, doe you demaund if have beene there? Yesman, above a thousand times, at the least. How farre Sir, I pray you(quoth Calandrino) is that worthy Countrey, from this our City? Introth, replyed Maso, the miles are hardly to be numbred, for themost part of them, we travell when we are nightly in our beddes, andif a man dreame right; he may be there upon a sudden.
2.  Ferando looking leane and pale, as one, that in so long time haddenot seene the light of heaven, and endured such strict disciplinetwice every day: stood in a gastly amazement by the Tombesside, as notdaring to adventure any further, or knowing perfectly, whether hewas (as yet) truly alive, or no. But when he saw the Monkes andAbbot comming, with their lighted Torches, and singing in a solemnemanner of Procession, he humbled himselfe at the Abbots feete, saying.Holy Father, by your zealous prayers (as hath bin miraculouslyrevealed to me) and the prayers of blessed S. Bennet; as also of myhonest, deare, and loving Wife, I have bin delivered from the painesof Purgatory, and brought againe to live in this world; for whichunspeakable grace and favour, most humbly I thanke the well-pleasedFates, S. Bennet, your Father-hood, and my kinde Wife, and willremember all your loves to me for ever. Blessed be the Fates, answeredthe Abbot, for working so great a wonder heere in our Monastery. Gothen my good Son, seeing the Fates have bin so gracious to thee; Go (Isay) home to thine owne house, and comfort thy kind wife, who eversince thy departure out of this life, hath lived in continuallmourning, love, cherish, and make much of her, never afflicting herhenceforth with causlesse jealousie. No I warrant you good Father,replyed Ferando; I have bin well whipt in Purgatory for such folly,and therefore I might be called a starke foole, if I should that wayoffend any more, either my loving wife, or any other.
3.  With these, and the like crosse entercourses, he often mockthimselfe, falling into the contrary, and then to this againe, and fromthe contrary, into another kind of alteration, wasting and consuminghimselfe, not only this day and the night following, but many moreafterward, til he lost both his feeding and sleepe, so that throughdebility of body, he was constrained to keepe his bed. Gisippus, whohad divers dayes noted his melancholly disposition, and now hisfalling into extreamitie of sicknesse, was very sorry to behold it:and with all meanes and inventions he could devise to use, hee bothquestioned the cause of this straunge alteration, and essayed everieway, how hee might best comfort him, never ceassing to demaunde areason, why he should become thus sad and sickely. But Titus afterinfinite importuning (which still he answered) with idle and frivolousexcuses, farre from the truth indeede, and (to the no meane afflictionof his friend) when he was able to use no more contradictions; atlength, in sighes and teares, thus he replyed.
4.  This Song gave occasion to the whole Company, to imagine, thatsome new and pleasing apprehension of Love, constrained MadamePhilomena to sing in this manner. And because (by the discoursethereof) it plainely appeared, that shee had felt more then sheesaw, shee was so much the more happy, and the like was wished by allthe rest. Wherefore, after the Song was ended; the Queeneremembring, that the next day following was Friday, turning herselfe graciously to them all, thus she spake.
5.  One in the company constantly avouched, that of all the Women bythem so generally observed, there was not any comparable to the Wifeof Egano de Galluzzi, dwelling in Bologna, and her name Madam Beatrix,reputed to be the onely faire woman of the world. Many of the restmaintained as much, having bin at Bologna, and likewise seene her.Lodovico hearing the woman to be so highly commended, and never (asyet) feeling any thought of amorous inclination; became sodainelytoucht with an earnest desire of seeing her, and his minde couldentertaine no other matter, but onely of travailing thither to seeher, yea, and to continue there, if occasion so served. The reason forhis journey urged to his Father, was to visit Jerusalem, and theholy Sepulcher, which with much difficulty, at length he obtainedhis leave.
6.  By this time, Nello being come againe unto them, they all returnedhome with Calandrino unto his owne house, whereinto he entering veryfaintly, hee saide to his Wife: Woman, make my Bed presently ready,for I feele my selfe to be growne extreamely sicke, and see thatthou layest cloathes enow upon me. Being thus laide in his Bedde, theyleft him for that night, and returned to visite him againe the verienext morning, by which time, he had made a reservation of his Water,and sent it by a young Damosell unto Maister Doctor, who dwelt then inthe olde market place, at the signe of the Muske Mellone. Then saideBruno unto his Companions; Abide you heere to keepe him company, and Iwill walke along to the Physitian, to understand what he will say: andif neede be, I can procure him to come hither with me. Calandrino verykindely accepted his offer, saying withall. Well Bruno, thou shewstthy selfe a friend in the time of necessity, I pray thee know ofhim, how the case stands with me, for I feele a very strangealteration within mee, far beyond all compasse of my conceite.

计划指导

1.  Faire Ladies, the paltry Judge of the Marquisate, whereofyesterday I made relation to you; hindred mee then of anotherNovell, concerning silly Calandrino, wherewith I purpose now toacquaint you. And because whatsoever hath already bin spoken of him,tended to no other end but matter of meriment, hee and hiscompanions duly considered; the Novel which I shal now report, keepethwithin the selfesame compasse, and aimeth also at your contentment,according to the scope of imposed variety.
2.  Rob me of that, which mine owne soule commends.
3.  Lesca, The good turnes and favours thou hast received from me,should make thee faithfull and obedient to me: and therefore set alocke uppon thy lippes, for revealing to any one whatsoever, suchmatters as now I shall impart to thee; except it be to him that Icommand thee. Thou perceivest Lesca, how youthfull I am, apt to allsprightly recreations, rich, and abounding in all that a woman canwish to have, in regard of Fortunes common and ordinary favours: yet Ihave one especiall cause of complaint: namely, the inequality of myMariage, my Husband being over-ancient for me; in which regard, myyouth finds it selfe too highly wronged, being defeated of thoseduties and delights, which Women (farre inferiour to me) arecontinuallie cloyed withall, and I am utterly deprived of. I amsubject to the same desires they are, and deserve to taste the benefitof them, in as ample manner, as they do or can.
4.  Much merriment was among the Ladies, hearing this Tale ofMartellinos misfortunes, so familiarly reported by Madam Neiphila, andof the men, it was best respected by Philostratus, who sitting neerestunto Neiphila, the Queene commanded his Tale to be the next, whenpresently he began to speake thus.
5.  Not long since (worthy Ladies) there dwelt in our owne nativeCity, a Friar Minor, an Inquisitor after matters of Faith; who,although he laboured greatly to seeme a sanctified man, and an earnestaffecter of Christian Religion, (as all of them appeare to be inoutward shew;) yet he was a much better Inquisitor after them that hadtheir purses plenteously stored with money, then of such as wereslenderly grounded in Faith. By which diligent continued care inhim, he found out a man, more rich in purse, then understanding; andyet not so defective in matters of faith, as misguided by his ownesimple speaking, and (perhaps) when his braine was well warmed withwine, words fell more foolishly from him, then in better judgementthey could have done.
6.  Ricciardo surnamed the Magnifico, gave a Horse to SigniorFrancesco Vergillisi, on condition that he might speake to his wife inhis presence; which he did, and she not returning him any answer, madeanswer to himselfe on her behalfe, and according to his answer, so theeffect followed.

推荐功能

1.  This Master Chappelet, was of so good and commendable life; that,being a Notarie, he held it in high disdaine, that any of hisContractes (although he made but few) should be found withoutfalshoode. And looke how many soever hee dealt withall, he would beurged and required thereto, offering them his paines and travailefor nothing, but to bee requited otherwise then by money; whichprooved to bee his much larger recompencing, and returned to him thefarre greater benefit. Hee tooke the onely pleasure of the world, tobeare false witnesse, if hee were thereto entreated, and(oftentimes) when hee was not requested at all. Likewise because inthose times, great trust and beleefe was given to an oath, he makingno care or conscience to be perjured: greatly advantaged himselfe byLaw suites, in regard that many matters relyed upon his oath, anddelivering the truth according to his knowledge.
2.  By a fountaines side:
3.  Grant it (great love) mine anguish to beguile.
4.  I am sure Andrea, that you greatly marvell at me, in gracing youwith this solemne and kinde entertainment, and why I should so melt myselfe in sighes and teares, at a man that hath no knowledge of mee, orperhaps, sildome or never heard any speeches of mee: but you shallinstantly receive from mee matter to augment your greater marvaile,meeting heere with your owne Sister, beyond all hope or expectation ineyther of us both. But seeing that Heaven hath beene so gracious tome, to let mee see one of my Brethren before I dye (though gladly Iwould have seene them all) which is some addition of comfort to me,and that which (happily) thou hast never heard before, in plaine andtruest manner, I will reveale unto thee.
5.   Adam Philomena having concluded her discourse, and the rareacknowledgement, which Titus made of his esteemed friend Gisippus,extolled justly as it deserved by all the Company: the King, reservingthe last office to Dioneus (as it was at the first granted him)began to speake thus. Without all question to the contrary (worthyLadies) nothing can be more truely said, then what Madame Philomena,hath delivered, concerning Amity, and her complaint in theconclusion of her Novell, is not without great reason, to see it soslenderly reverenced and respected (now a dayes) among all men. But ifwe had met here in duty onely for correcting the abuses of iniquity,and the malevolent courses of this preposterous age; I could proceedfurther in this just cause of complaint. But because our end aimeth atmatters of other nature, it commeth to my memory to tel you of aHistory, which (perhaps) may seeme somewhat long, but altogetherpleasant, concerning a magnificent act of great Saladine: to theend, that by observing those things which you shall heare in myNovell, if we cannot (by reason of our manifold imperfections)intirely compasse the amity of any one; yet (at least) we may takedelight, in stretching our kindnesse (in good deeds) so farre as weare able, in hope one day after, some worthy reward will ensuethereon, as thereto justly appertaining.
6.  In the meane while, Gulfardo having determined what he would do,watched a convenient time, when he went unto Gasparuolo, and sayde:Sir, I have some businesse of maine importance, and shall neede to usebut two hundred Crownes onely: I desire you to lend me so manyCrownes, upon such profite as you were wont to take of mee, at othertimes when I have made use of you, and I shall not faile you at myday.

应用

1.  The servant departing from her with the child, and reporting theMarquesse what his Lady had said; he wondered at her incomparableconstancy. Then he sent it by the same servant to Bologna, to anhonourable Lady his kinsewoman, requesting her (without revealingwhose child it was) to see it both nobly and carefully educated.
2.  I know no Lady living,
3.  Not without much laughter and good liking, was the Tale of MadameAemillia listened unto, and both the prayers commended to be sound andsoveraigne: but it being ended, the King commaunded Philostratus, thathee should follow next in order, whereupon thus he began.
4、  COURTESIE, OF A TRUE AND CONSTANT LOVER: AS ALSO THE
5、  It was noysed abroad by common report, that the King of Francewas in a very dangerous condition, by reason of a strange swellingon his stomacke, which failing of apt and convenient curing, becamea Fistula, afflicting him daily with extraordinary paine andanguish, no Chirurgeon or Physitian being found, that could ministerany hope of healing, but rather encreased the greefe, and drove itto more vehement extreamitie, compelling the King, as dispairingutterly of all helpe, to give over any further counsell or advice.Heereof faire Juliet was wondrously joyfull, as hoping that thisaccident would prove the meanes, not onely of her journey to Paris,but if the disease were no more then she imagined; she could easilycure it, and thereby compasse Count Bertrand to be her husband.Hereupon, quickning up her wits, with remembrance of those rules ofArt, which (by long practise and experience) she had learned of herskilfull Father, she compounded certaine hearbes together, such as sheknew fitting for that kinde of infirmity, and having reduced hercompound into powder, away she rode forthwith to Paris.

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  • 祝筱筠 08-04

      A pretty while the Provoste stood musing, and at last saide. A placeMadame? where can be more privacie, then in your owne house? AlasSir (quoth she) you know that I have two Gentlemen my brethren, whocontinually are with me, and other of their friends beside: My housealso is not great, wherefore it is impossible to be there, exceptyou could be like a dumbe man, without speaking one word, or makingthe very least noyse; beside, to remaine in darkenesse, as if you wereblinde, and who can be able to endure all these? And yet (withoutthese) there is no adventuring, albeit they never come into myChamber: but their lodging is so close to mine, as there cannot anyword be spoken, be it never so low or in whispering manner, but theyheare it very easily. Madame said the Provoste, for one or two nights,I can make hard shift. Why Sir (quoth she) the matter onelyremaineth in you, for if you be silent and suffering, as already youhave heard, there is no feare at all of safty. Let me alone Madame,replyed the Provoste, I will be governed by your directions: but, inany case, let us begin this night. With all my heart, saide shee. Soappointing him how, and when hee should come; hee parted from her, andshee returned home to her house.

  • 陈东旭 08-04

      Catharina standing musing awhile, at last returned him this answere.Signio Ricciardo, quoth she, you see what a restraint is set on myliberty, how short I am kept from conversing with any one, that I holdthis our enterparlance now almost miraculous. But if you coulddevise any convenient meanes, to admit us more familiar freedome,without any prejudice to mine honour, or the least distaste to myParents; do but enstruct it, and I will adventure it. Ricciardo havingconsidered on many wayes and meanes, thought one to be the fittestof all; and therefore thus replyed. Catharina (quoth he) the onelyplace for our more private talking together, I conceive to be theGallery over your Fathers Garden. If you can winne your Mother tolet you lodge there, I will make meanes to climbe over the wall, andat the goodly gazing window, we may discourse so long as we please.Now trust me deare Love (answered Catharina) no place can be moreconvenient for our purpose, there shall we heare the sweete Birdssing, especially the Nightingale which I have heard singing thereall the night long; I will breake the matter to my Mother, and how Ispeede, you shall heare further from me. So, with divers partingkisses, they brake off conference, till their next meeting.

  • 田圆 08-04

       THE EIGHT DAY, THE NINTH NOVELL

  • 苏蔓愣 08-04

      quoth Egano, Yes Wife, he came, but deerely to my cost: for heeverily taking me for thee, hath beaten me most extreamly, calling mean hundred Whores and Strumpets, reputing thee to bee the wickedstWoman living. In good sadnesse Beatrix, I wondred not a little at him,that he would give thee any such vile speeches, with intent to wrongmee in mine honour. Questionlesse, because hee saw thee to bejoviall spirited, gracious and affable towardes all men; therefore heeintended to make triall of thine honest carriage. Well Sir (saydeshee) twas happy that hee tempted mee with words, and let you tastethe proofe of them by deeds: and let him thinke, that I brooke thosewords as distastably, as you do or can, his ill deeds. But seeing heis so just, faithfull, and loyall to you, you may love him the better,and respect him as you finde occasion.

  • 隋振江 08-03

    {  Now, although it seemed a most severe imposition, for Albert topasse in any of these disguises: yet his exceeding feare ofLisettaes brethren and friends, made him gladly yeelde, and to undergowhat shape the poore man pleased, which thus he ordered. Annointinghis naked body with Hony, he then covered it over with downy smallFeathers, and fastening a chaine about his necke, and a strange uglyvizard on his face, he gave him a great staffe in the one hand, andtwo huge Mastive dogs chained together in the other, which he hadborrowed in the Butchery. Afterward, he sent a man to the Rialto,who there proclaimed by the sound of Trumpet: That all such as desiredto see God Cupid, which the last nights had descended downe from theskies, and fell (by ill hap) into the Venetian gulfe, let them repaireto the publike Market place of S. Marke, and there he would appeare inhis owne likenesse.

  • 靳喜凤 08-02

      A young Gentleman being a Scholler, fell in love with a Ladie, namedHelena, she being a Widdow, and addicted in affection to anotherGentleman. One whole night in cold Winter, she caused the Schollerto expect her comming, in an extreame frost and snow. In revengewhereof, by his imagined Art and skill, he made her to stand nakedon the top of a Tower, the space of a whole day, and in the hot monethof July, to be Sunburnt and bitten with Waspes and Flies.}

  • 江玉 08-02

      The Ladie seeing her desire disappointed, and her fond expectationutterly frustrated: grew instantly forgetfull of her intemperate love,and falling into extremity of rage, converted her former gentle andloving speeches, into this harsh and ruder language. Villaine (quothshe) shall the longing comforts of my life, be abridged by thy baseand scornefull deniall? Shall my destruction be wrought by thy mostcurrish unkindenesse, and all my hoped joyes be defeated in amoment? Know Slave, that I did not so earnestly desire thy sweeteembracements before, but now as deadly I hate and despise them;which either thy death or banishment shall deerely pay for. Nosooner had she thus spoken, but tearing her haire, and renting hergarments in peeces, she ranne about like a distracted Woman, cryingout alowd; Helpe, helpe, the Count D'Angiers will forcibly dishonourmee, the lustfull Count will violate mine honour.

  • 贾松基 08-02

      To cut off future fell contending strife,

  • 毛传同 08-01

       Understand then (most faire Ladies) that in former times longsince past, our Cittie had many excellent and commendable customesin it; whereof (in these unhappy dayes of ours) we cannot say thatpoore one remaineth, such hath beene the too much encrease of Wealthand Covetousnesse, the onely supplanters of all good qualitieswhatsoever. Among which lawdable and friendly observations, therewas one well deserving note, namely, that in divers places ofFlorence, men of the best houses in every quarter, had a sociableand neighbourly assemblie together, creating their company toconsist of a certaine number, such as were able to supply theirexpences; as this day one, and to morrow another: and thus in akinde of friendly course, each dally furnished the Table, for the restof the company. Oftentimes, they did honour to divers Gentlemen andstrangers, upon their arrivall in our Citty, by inviting them intotheir assembly, and many of our worthiest Citizens beside; so thatit grew to a customary use, and one especially day in the yeareappointed, in memory of this so loving a meeting, when they would ride(triumphally as it were) on horsebacke thorow the Cittie, sometimesperforming Tilts, Tourneyes, and other Martiall exercises, but theywere reserved for Feastivall dayes.

  • 波莉亚娜·冲本 07-30

    {  With men it is not so, they are borne apt for a thousandoccasions, as well for the present purpose wee talke of, as infiniteother beside; yea, and many of them are more esteemed being aged, thenwhen they were young. But women serve onely for mens contentation, andto bring Children; and therefore are they generally beloved, whichif they faile of, either it is by unfortunate marriage, or someimperfection depending on nature, not through want of good will inthemselves. Wee have nothing in this World but what is given us, inwhich regard, wee are to make use of our time, and employ it thebetter while wee have it. For, when wee grow to bee old, our Husbands,yea, our very dearest and nearest Friends, will scarsely looke onus. Wee are then fit for nothing, but to sit by the fire in theKitchin, telling tales to the Cat, or counting the Pots and Panneson the shelves. Nay, which is worse, Rimes and Songs is made of us,even in meere contempt of our age, and commendation of such as areyoung, the daintiest morsels are fittest for them, and wee referred tofeed on the scrappes from their Trenchers, or such reversion as theycan spare us. I tell thee Daughter, thou couldst not make choyce ofa meeter woman in all the City, to whom thou mightest safely openthy minde, and knowes better to advise thee then I doe. But rememberwithall, that I am poore, and it is your part not to suffer poverty tobee unsupplyed. I will make thee partaker of all these blessedpardons, at every Altar I will say a Pater Noster, and an Ave Maria,that thou maist prosper in thy hearts desires, and be defended fromfoule sinne and shame, and so she ended her Motherly counsell.

  • 曾文溪 07-30

      Holy Father (as you know much better then any other) everie one thatdesireth to live well and vertuously, ought to shunne (so farre asin them lyeth) all occasions that may induce to the contrarie. Tothe end therefore, that I (who desire nothing more) then to livewithin the compasse of a vertuous conversation, may perfect my hopesin this behalfe: I have fled from my Fathers Court, and am come hitherin this habite as you see, to crave therein your holy and fatherlyfurtherance. I am daughter to the King of England, and havesufficiently furnished my selfe with some of his Treasures, thatyour Holinesse may bestow me in marriage; because mine unkindFather, never regarding my youth and beauty (inferior to few in mynative country) would marry me to the King of North-Wales, an aged,impotent, and sickely man. Yet let me tell your sanctity, that his ageand weakenesse hath not so much occasioned my Right, as feare ofmine owne youth and frailety; when being married to him, instead ofloyall and unstained life, lewd and dishonest desires might make me towander, by breaking the divine Lawes of wedlocke, and abusing theroyall blood of my Father.

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